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SAGE Sociology

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SAGE Sociology

SAGE Publications Ltd.

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Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Sociology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
 
Hosts Lizzie Post and Daniel Post Senning answer audience questions about modern etiquette with advice based on consideration, respect, and honesty. Like their great-great-grandmother, Emily Post, Lizzie and Dan look for the reasons behinds the traditional rules to guide their search for the correct behavior in all kinds of contemporary situations. Test your social acumen and join the discussion about civility and decency in today's complex world.
 
Wish you could do a better job keeping up with peer-reviewed journals? Why not listen to a podcast where behavior analysts discuss a variety of fascinating topics and the research related to them? Now you can spend your extra time thinking of ways to save the world with ABA.
 
Economists say the way we work has become so stressful it’s now the fifth leading cause of death. Our mission is to find a better way. Explore the art and science of living a full and healthy life with behavioral and social science researchers who can help us better understand what drives our human experiences, and how to change. Better Life Lab is a co-production from New America and Slate.
 
If you want to understand how social scientists’ study human behaviour, how industry innovates or want to know more about how they can successfully work together and enhance each other, then you have come to the right place! Join our hosts as they engage with anthropologists, other researchers and industry specialists from all over the world. The discussions will be about their specific work in understanding people and how they apply that understanding to advance industry, scholarship and/or ...
 
From Plato to quantum physics, Walter Benjamin to experimental poetry, Frantz Fanon to the history of political radicalism, The Podcast for Social Research is a crucial part of our mission to forge new, organic paths for intellectual work in the twenty-first century: an ongoing, interdisciplinary series featuring members of the Institute, and occasional guests, conversing about a wide variety of intellectual issues, some perennial, some newly pressing. Each episode centers on a different top ...
 
Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition. Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podca ...
 
Join your host, Jonathan Singer, Ph.D., LCSW in an exploration of all things social work, including direct practice, human behavior in the social environment, research, policy, field work, social work education, and everything in between. Big names talking about bigger ideas. The purpose of the podcast is to present information in a user-friendly format. Although the intended audience is social workers, the information will be useful to anyone in a helping profession (including psychology, n ...
 
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UCSUR Radio (@PittCSUR)

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UCSUR Radio (@PittCSUR)

University Center for Social & Urban Research (UCSUR)

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UCSUR Radio is a social science podcast created by the University Center for Social & Urban Research (UCSUR) at the University of Pittsburgh. We focus on a social, economic, or health issue most relevant to our society. Discussions and presentations highlight neighborhood, community, economic, and other social research conducted by our esteemed colleagues. Presenters include local, national, and international social research experts.
 
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COMPLEXITY

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COMPLEXITY

Santa Fe Institute, Michael Garfield

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Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…
 
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China 21

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China 21

21st Century China Center, Harris Doshay

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China 21 is produced by the 21st Century China Center at UC San Diego’s School of Global Policy and Strategy. We are a leading university-based think tank that produces scholarly research and informs policy discussions on China and U.S.-China relations. This podcast features expert voices, insights and stories about China’s economy, politics, society, and the implications for international affairs. Learn more at china.ucsd.edu
 
Unabridged philosophy audiobooks including writing by Plato (Parmenides), Aristotle (Economics), Cicero (On Moral Duties) and Plotinus (Enneads). Topics discussed include ethics, justice, law, logic, metaphysics, God, happiness, love and beauty. Each book has been streamlined by merging separate LibriVox recordings into a single seamless whole with no interruptions. Painting: La Perle et la vague by Paul-Jacques-Aimé Baudry.
 
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Uncommon Sense

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Uncommon Sense

The Sociological Review

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Our world afresh, through the eyes of sociologists. Brought to you by The Sociological Review, Uncommon Sense is a space for questioning taken-for-granted ideas about society – for imagining better ways of living together and confronting our shared crises. Hosted by Rosie Hancock in Sydney and Alexis Hieu Truong in Ottawa, featuring a different guest each month, Uncommon Sense insists that sociology is for everyone – and that you definitely don’t have to be a sociologist to think like one!
 
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In Race, Culture and Media (Sage, 2021), Anamik Saha provides an account of the role that media plays in both circulating and shaping ideas about race and racism in the contemporary world. Saha argues that we need to move beyond a focus on representation to engage with how media makes race. As Anamik describes in our interview, alongside providing …
 
In today's episode of The Annex Sociology Podcast, host Daniel Morrison (Abilene Christian University) sits down with Josh Packard (Springtide Research) to discuss teens' and young adults' changing relationship with religion, their wellbeing, and alt-ac careers. Photo Credit. By MonstreDélicat - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org…
 
Author Liann Yamashita discusses her article, "'I Just Couldn’t Relate to That Asian American Narrative': How Southeast Asian Americans Reconsider Panethnicity" published in the April 2022 issue of Sociology of Race and Ethnicity.
 
Skydiving, BASE jumping, climbing the highest peaks, adventuring to remote parts of the world — pushing the boundaries of safety. For thrill-seekers, chasing the rush is what it’s all about. Where lots of us would break into a cold sweat, they experience something different: calm, focus, even moments of sublime awe. So what is it that makes thrill-…
 
The British psychologist Kimberley Wilson works in the emergent field of whole body mental health, one of the most astonishing frontiers we are on as a species. Discoveries about the gut microbiome, for example, and the gut-brain axis; the fascinating vagus nerve and the power of the neurotransmitters we hear about in piecemeal ways in discussions …
 
The British psychologist Kimberley Wilson works in the emergent field of whole body mental health, one of the most astonishing frontiers we are on as a species. Discoveries about the gut microbiome, for example, and the gut-brain axis; the fascinating vagus nerve and the power of the neurotransmitters we hear about in piecemeal ways in discussions …
 
Lots of us feel the need to believe in something in order to make sense of the world whether it takes the form of religious faith, the provability of science, or some singular strongly-held theory. But belief does not necessarily satisfy another great human need, the need to belong to a community. Joining Ed Kessler, Danny Smith and Grace Davie exp…
 
Today we are joined by Dr. Shannon Walsh, Associate Professor of Theatre History, and author of Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020). In our conversation, we discussed the origins of women’s physical culture in the United States, the role that physical culture reformers…
 
Larry C Johnson is a veteran of the CIA and the State Department’s Office of Counter Terrorism. He is the founder and managing partner of BERG Associates, which was established in 1998. Larry provided training to the US Military’s Special Operations community for 24 years. He has been vilified by the right and the left, which means he must be doing…
 
Horror Addicts Episode# 206 SEASON 17 Horror Hostess: Emerian Rich Intro Music by: Valentine Wolfe ——————— 206 | Divination | Hannah Hulbert | The Royal Ritual http://traffic.libsyn.com/horroraddicts/HorrorAddicts206.mp3 Find all articles and interviews at: http://www.horroraddicts.net 177 days till Halloween Theme: #Divination #DarkDivinations Dar…
 
Philanthropy is sometimes cited as a force for good in the 21st century. People have donated money for societal gain for hundreds of years, though, and we can learn lessons from the successes and failures of past investments. On this episode, we talk with Michael Meyer of the University of Pittsburgh about his book, Benjamin Franklin’s Last Bet: Th…
 
Postcolonial feminist scholarship on the formation of gender relations primarily uses the analytic of colonizer-colonized dyad. In her new monograph, Gender Politics at Home and Abroad: Protestant Modernity in Colonial-Era Korea (Cambridge UP, 2020), Professor Hyaeweol Choi makes an important intervention by examining colonial Korea to propose a ne…
 
In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh leg…
 
Uganda's capital, Kampala, is undergoing dramatic urban transformations as its new technocratic government seeks to clean and green the city. Waste Worlds: Inhabiting Kampala's Infrastructures of Disposability (U California Press, 2021) tracks the dynamics of development and disposability unfolding amid struggles over who and what belong in the new…
 
Immigration is one of the most fraught, and possibly most misunderstood, topics in American social discourse—yet, in most cases, the things we believe about immigration are based largely on myth, not facts. Using the tools of modern data analysis and ten years of pioneering research, Streets of Gold: America's Untold Story of Immigrant Success (Pub…
 
Algorithms that work with deep learning and big data are getting so much better at doing so many things that it makes us uncomfortable. How can a device know what our favorite songs are, or what we should write in an email? Have machines become too smart? In Artificial Communication: How Algorithms Produce Social Intelligence (MIT Press, 2022), Ele…
 
As the world confronts the largest refugee crisis since World War II, wealthy countries are being called upon to open their doors to the displaced, with the assumption that this will restore their prospects for a bright future. Refuge: How the State Shapes Human Potential (Princeton UP, 2022) follows Syrians who fled a brutal war in their homeland …
 
New code, new ethics problems, new episode! Friend of the show, Dr. Darren Sush, joins us just in time for all of these changes with a second edition of one of our favorite publications, “A Workbook of Ethical Case Scenarios in Applied Behavior Analysis.” We tackle six big cases from the book covering whole new areas of ethical behavior, as well as…
 
There’s no shortage of tunes about evil machines in the industrial soundscape, so this month, Ed and Justin explore the concept of robotics in music. Check out some songs about replicants, androids, cyborgs, and more from a very eclectic selection of artists. We’ve got steampunk, industrial, goth, and… chap-hop? Why not? Special thanks to LonelyAss…
 
In this lively interview series from the RSA, Matthew Taylor, puts a range of practitioners on the spot - from scholars to business leaders, politicians to journalists - by asking for big ideas to help build effective bridges to our new future. Is Britain really the butler to the world's kleptocrats, criminals and tax dodgers? Is this country, fame…
 
Professor Duncan Bell joins the Hayseed Scholar podcast. Duncan grew up in the Midlands in a rural area of England. He was interested in international politics from a fairly young age. Duncan chose to pursue a degree in war studies at King's College London, and considered joining the military thereafter. But the transition to London from a quieter …
 
Being unemployed in the United States is bad for you. It’s bad for your mental, physical and emotional health. Bad for your family stability. Bad for your ability to survive. It’s just bad news, period. The research shows that 83 percent of laid-off workers develop a serious stress-related condition. And as we look at the future of work, that’s a p…
 
Does the idea of a world in which facts mean nothing cause anxiety? Fear? Maybe even paranoia? Disinformation: The Nature of Facts and Lies in the Post-Truth Era (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022) cannot cure all the ills of a post-truth world, but by demonstrating how the emergence of digital technology into everyday life has knitted together a number…
 
Ratan Kumar Roy's book Television in Bangladesh: News and Audiences (Routledge, 2020) examines the role of 24/7 television news channels in Bangladesh. By using a multi-sited ethnography of television news media, it showcases the socio-political undercurrents of media practices and the everydayness of TV news in Bangladesh. It discusses a wide gamu…
 
Human fertility rates are declining fast and in twenty years or so the global population will go down fast – not just in affluent countries but in the world as a whole. While many may welcome that outcome, Professor John Aitken who has just written The Infertility Trap: Why Life Choices Impact Your Fertility and Why We Must Act Now (Cambridge UP, 2…
 
Political corruption remains … one of the most intriguing and challenging issues in social science research and public policy, perhaps because although it occurs in virtually all polities, its causes, patterns, and consequences often seem unique to each circumstance. – Cadres and Corruption by Xiaobo Lu (2000) Corruption is rampant in many authorit…
 
Diminished Faculties: A Political Phenomenology of Impairment (Duke UP, 2022) begins by calling into question a fundamental principle of orthodox phenomenology (and, for that matter, a great deal of humanities research): that of a fully self-aware unchanging subject who can provide a coherent account of its own experience, one which is commensurabl…
 
Welcome to Awesome Etiquette, where we explore modern etiquette through the lens of consideration, respect and honesty. On today’s show we take your questions on gifts at gender reveal parties, answering questions about having a baby in a same sex relationship, etiquette for editors, and graduation announcements and gifts for grads. For Awesome Eti…
 
Horror Addicts Episode# 205 SEASON 17 Horror Hostess: Emerian Rich Intro Music by: Valentine Wolfe ——————— 205 | Graveyards | Kevin Ground | Crimson Brulee http://traffic.libsyn.com/horroraddicts/HorrorAddicts205.mp3 Find all articles and interviews at: http://www.horroraddicts.net 191 days till Halloween Theme: #Graveyards #Cemeteries #LorenRhoads…
 
In this episode of the Poverty Research & Policy Podcast, we hear from Brieanna Watters and Robert Stewart about a paper they coauthored* on Native Americans and Monetary Sanctions involving the criminal legal system. They discuss how Native American experiences in relation to the legal system are often unique, how the rural nature of Indian Countr…
 
It's easy to be pessimistic about inequality. We know it has increased dramatically in many parts of the world over the past two generations. No one has done more to reveal the problem than Thomas Piketty. Now, in this surprising and powerful new work, Piketty reminds us that the grand sweep of history gives us reasons to be optimistic. Over the ce…
 
Sylvia Chan-Malik is Associate Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. She talks, teaches, and writes about the intersections of race, gender, and religion, with a focus on the history and cultures of Islam and Muslims in the United States. Her research highlights the lives, voic…
 
In Projectland: Life in a Lao Socialist Model Village (U Hawaii Press, 2021), anthropologist Holly High combines an engaging first-person narrative of her fieldwork with a political ethnography of Laos, more than forty years after the establishment of the Lao PDR and more than seven decades since socialist ideologues first “liberated” parts of upla…
 
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