show episodes
 
It’s 1990. The Berlin Wall just fell. The Soviet Union is on the verge of collapse. And the soundtrack to the revolution is one of the best selling songs of all time, the metal ballad “Wind of Change,” by the Scorpions.Decades later, journalist Patrick Radden Keefe heard a rumor: the song wasn’t written by the Scorpions. It was written by the CIA. This is his journey to find the truth.Wind of Change is an Original Series from Pineapple Street Studios, Crooked Media and Spotify.
 
Eric Tabach and his mom, Irine, have the weirdest, overly open mother-son relationship. Join Eric, a Zillennial ex-BuzzFeed producer, comedian and actor with an IMDb and Irine, a Soviet-born, ex-CFO turned real estate mogul, at their dinner table weekly, as they discuss all things sexy, relevant, and personal from extremely opposite perspectives. Son VS mom, progressive American VS conservative soviet Russian, jobless actor VS wealthy real estate agent. All of this and more every Wednesday!
 
The History of the Cold War Podcast will cover the Cold War from the period of roughly 1945 to 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union in bi-monthly instalments on the first and fifteenth. This Podcast will examine the Cold War from a number of different perspectives including political, diplomatic, cultural, ideological etc. This series is intended to be a grand narrative of the conflict exploring it from its early origins to its final moments and its effects on the world today. Please join u ...
 
In the early 70s, Debbie Gayle was one of Britain’s most promising young ballerinas. At the age of 17, she was chosen to go to the Soviet Union and become the first Westerner to train at Russia’s finest ballet academy. It was a dream come true for her, but just a few months later, things took a near deadly turn for her. She made it out of the country thanks to a young girl named Natasha who she never saw or heard from again. In Finding Natasha, Debbie’s son Jake Warren – a journalist and pod ...
 
November 9, 2019, is the 30th anniversary of the day the Berlin Wall came crashing down, freeing East Germany from communism, and marking the beginning of the end of the Soviet Union. But when did the Cold War start? Why does it matter 30 years later? Find out in this ten-part series, transport back in time, feel what it was like to live through the end of the Cold War, and understand why that struggle was a battle for civilization itself. Bill Whittle narrates this compelling series about t ...
 
Parklife is a podcast about the people that make the parks we visit what they are. The first series visits a busy suburban park in Hanoi, Vietnam. It has been used as a dump, outlived a name change to honour Vladimir Lenin and survived a major redevelopment scam. We follow the characters that tread its leafy paths. Dancers and young lovers, gamblers and prostitutes reveal their lives in an evolving one-party state.
 
Hello and welcome to andallthat.co.uk’s new podcast series: Meet the Historians. Over the course of this first series I will be talking to a number of historians who have written about the Soviet Union and finding out a bit more about their historical methods and approaches. I will also be exploring their interpretations of key topics such as: Stalin’s wartime leadership; the effectiveness of Khrushchev’s de-Stalinisation programme; and the reasons for the breakup of the USSR. The series wil ...
 
In an alternate history of the Cold War, the Soviet Union wins the Space Race and American astronauts never land on the Moon. Told through radio news broadcasts in 1968 and 1969, The Soyuz Files takes you from the skyscrapers of Manhattan to the spires of the Kremlin. Join investigative journalist Jack Schechter as he gets swept up in the intrigue of two rocket scientists, a Soviet diplomat, and the lies that hold everything together. Presented by The West, an LA-based multimedia storytellin ...
 
It’s 1945. Hitler is defeated. America is looking to outsmart a new enemy, the Soviet Union. To advance in rocketry, aviation, and chemical weapons, America recruits scientists and engineers who fueled the war machine of another nation...Nazi Germany. Inspired by the true story behind the Emmy-eligible drama series "Hunters" from Amazon Studios, starring Al Pacino and Logan Lerman, PAPERCLIP explores how Operation Paperclip – the recruitment of Nazi Germany’s most brilliant and, in many case ...
 
"It is for LIBERTY that CHRIST has set us FREE." - Galatians 5:1 Join me, Slavic, your host from the former Soviet Union, as we reintroduce the concept of TRUE LIBERTY back to America, and the world. Because there are some fates that are worse than death. If you feel led to support this show and the mission to spread the good news of Jesus Christ and to free America and the rest of humanity from Satan's spiritual, mental, emotional, psychological and physical slavery of the New World Order, ...
 
Major areas of focus include regional security, domestic politics, economic development, trade and transit, defense technology, and energy, among others. CSIS also analyzes the political and economic relationships between the states of the former Soviet Union and other critical geopolitical actors, including the United States, the European Union, and the states of Northeast Asia, South Asia, and the Greater Middle East. This work is anchored by the Russia and Eurasia Program and supplemented ...
 
Welcome to On Cue Chris Costello. My Dad, Lou Costello, of the popular comedy team Abbott and Costello, was not only a comic, but a humanitarian who loved helping people. He was a sincere advocate when it came to helping others, and to be there for people who wanted to make a positive difference in our world. I guess you might say, his passion has been passed on to me. I invite you to come and listen, as I talk with people who are making an imprint in our world. People such as Elizabeth Beis ...
 
The Flying Saucers are Real is a book that investigates numerous encounters between USAF fighters, personnel, and other aircraft, and UFOs between 1947 and 1950. Keyhoe contended that the Air Force was actively investigating these cases of close encounter, with a policy of concealing their existence from the public until 1949. He stated that this policy was then replaced by one of cautious, progressive revelation. Keyhoe further stated that Earth had been visited by extraterrestrials for two ...
 
Henry Beam Piper’s book “Five Sci-Fi Short Stories“ is a collection of: The Answer, Temple Trouble, Flight From Tomorrow, Police Operation and Graveyard of Dreams. “The Answer” is about two nuclear scientists who have successfully made a very powerful weapon and are planning to drop it from space on un-expecting earthlings. The story is set in 1984, many years after a supposed nuclear war between the US and the Soviet Union had ended. The stories "Temple Trouble" and "Police Operation" deal ...
 
A Red Line in the Sand is the official companion podcast to journalist David Andelman's book of the same name, published by Pegasus Books.From the islands of the South China Sea to Korea's DMZ, the tribes of Arabia across Africa and throughout Europe, red lines have been setting agendas and changing history for centuries. A Red Line in the Sand will jump around the world in 12 episodes examining these boundaries that have changed history, set political agendas, spilled blood and smoothed pat ...
 
Julia Bendis was born in the Former Soviet Union and moved to the US at the age of thirteen with her parents and younger brother. The women in her family have always done three major things in their lives: feed everyone, match and help everyone around them! Both her mother and grandmother have always dabbled in matchmaking, and continue to count numerous weddings and babies as a result. Julia's first match was when she was in high school, and she hasn’t stopped since. Matchmaking has literal ...
 
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show series
 
Conflicting notions about the dynamics of race in Russia and the Soviet Union have made it difficult for both scholars and other observers of the region to understand rising racial tension in Russian and Eurasian societies. Ideologies of Race: Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union in a Global Context (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2019) is an int…
 
This week the word is Chernobyl, and the nerds start by discussing various aspects of that and other big disasters. Andy talks about getting his first shot, and the nerds speculate about life after vaccination. Keith talks about Harley Quinn, and Andy talks about Infinity Train. Keith reports on the D&D campaign he’s doing on Patreon, and on the pr…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0V6Ol8N-Dg&t=4s Guest: Nazif Shahrani is Professor of Anthropology, Central Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Indiana University. He is the author of The Kirghiz and Wakhi of Afghanistan: Adaptation to Closed Frontiers and War and the editor of Modern Afghanistan: The Impact of 40 Years of War [1]. [1] https://iup…
 
One year ago, I recorded the first ever episode of the 6 Ranch Podcast on the wild and scenic Snake River with Bruce Wassom, founder of Rogue Jet Boatworks. It seems only fitting that I chat with Bruce a year later after running jets up the Salmon through the Frank Church Wilderness. And this time we're also joined by Bruce's good friend, Pat Juhl.…
 
NOW IN 22 DIFFERENT LANGUAGES. CLICK ON THE LOWER LEFT HAND CORNER “TRANSLATE” TAB TO FIND YOURS! By Jeff J. Brown Pictured above: David William Pear has been on China Rising Radio Sinoland several times, for good reason. He is a fearless anti-imperial comrade! Well traveled and hands-on, David is seen here on the coast...…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUw2mbHoAsk&t=106s Guest: Neil Price is distinguished professor and chair of archaeology at Uppsala University, Sweden. He is the author of several books on the history of the Viking Age including his latest, Children of Ash and Elm: A History of the Vikings.By Letters and Politics
 
John Calvin was known foremost for his powerful impact on the fundamental doctrines of Protestantism, and his biblical interpretation continues to attract interest and inquiry. Calvin, the Bible, and History investigates Calvin's exegesis of the Bible through the lens of one of its most distinctive and distinguishing features: his historicizing app…
 
Between the world wars, a generation of Jewish leftist poets reached out to other embattled peoples of the earth--Palestinian Arabs, African Americans, Spanish Republicans--in Yiddish verse. Songs in Dark Times examines the richly layered meanings of this project, grounded in Jewish collective trauma but embracing a global community of the oppresse…
 
Conflicting notions about the dynamics of race in Russia and the Soviet Union have made it difficult for both scholars and other observers of the region to understand rising racial tension in Russian and Eurasian societies. Ideologies of Race: Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union in a Global Context (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2019) is an int…
 
Often referred to as “the Russian Leonardo”, religious philosopher and Orthodox parish priest Pavel Florensky was a pivotal figure in the Russian religious renaissance at the turn of the 20th century. In Visual Thought in Russian Religious Philosophy: Pavel Florensky's Theory of the Icon (Routledge 2019), art historian Clemena Antonova (Research Di…
 
The 19th century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche stands among the canon’s most-cited figures, with aphorisms dotting texts on a variety of topics, and his name evokes strong responses from almost anyone who has ever heard of him. His aphoristic and poetic writing style have made it difficult at times to understand what he meant, although the…
 
"… I am an axe; And my son a handle, soon; To be shaping again, model; And tool, craft of culture; How we go on." - Gary Snyder, Axe Handles (1983) "… wisdom comes to those who understand the student is more important than the teacher in the lineage of knowledge." - Wade Davis, New Books Network (2021) Of the three major influences on Wade Davis’ l…
 
Quiet Spiders of the Hidden Soul: Mykola (Nik) Bazhan’s Early Experimental Poetry (Academic Studies Press, 2020) presents a collection of early works by Mykola Bazhan, one of the most enigmatic figures in Ukrainian literature of the twentieth century. The volume was prepared and edited by Oksana Rosenblum, Lev Fridman, and Anzhelika Khyzhnia. The n…
 
Marko Dumancic's book Men Out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties (University of Toronto Press, 2021) charts conversations and polemics about masculinity in Soviet cinema and popular media during the liberal period - often described as "The Thaw" - between the death of Stalin in 1953 and the invasion of Czechoslovakia in 196…
 
Conflicting notions about the dynamics of race in Russia and the Soviet Union have made it difficult for both scholars and other observers of the region to understand rising racial tension in Russian and Eurasian societies. Ideologies of Race: Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union in a Global Context (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2019) is an int…
 
Some books are new, others are newly relevant – and so worth looking at from a new, contemporary perspective. Such is the case with Susan Reverby’s book Examining Tuskegee: The Infamous Syphilis Study and its Legacy (UNC Press, 2013). When the book was published in 2009, our world was reeling from a global financial crisis that exposed how subprime…
 
Conflicting notions about the dynamics of race in Russia and the Soviet Union have made it difficult for both scholars and other observers of the region to understand rising racial tension in Russian and Eurasian societies. Ideologies of Race: Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union in a Global Context (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2019) is an int…
 
From submarines to the suburbs--the remaking of Pittsburgh during the Cold War During the early Cold War, research facilities became ubiquitous features of suburbs across the United States. Pittsburgh's eastern and southern suburbs hosted a constellation of such facilities that became the world's leading center for the development of nuclear reacto…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfTUXReorBc&t=31s Guest: David Harvey [1] is a Distinguished Professor of Anthropology [2] & Geography [3] at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) [4], the Director of Research at the Center for Place, Culture and Politics [5], and the author of numerous books, his latest is [6]The Anti-Capit…
 
In Migration and Hybrid Political Regimes: Navigating the Legal Landscape in Russia (University of California Press, 2020), Dr. Rustam Urinboyev presents rich ethnographic material to reconceptualize how migrants adapt to new legal environment in hybrid political regimes that are neither democratic nor conventionally authoritarian. Focused on Uzbek…
 
In American Writers and World War I (Oxford University Press, 2020), David A. Rennie argues that authors' war writing continuously evolved in response to developments in their professional and personal lives. He examines texts by Edith Wharton, Ellen La Motte, Mary Borden, Thomas Boyd, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Laurence Stallings, and Ernest Hemingway. …
 
In Give Me Liberty: A History of America's Exceptional Idea (Basic Books, 2019), Richard Brookhiser has written a history of an idea, liberty, using an unconventional format of a review of documents from America’s past that touch upon different understandings of liberty. Brookhiser reviews thirteen documents from each era of America’s past. He star…
 
NOW IN 22 DIFFERENT LANGUAGES. CLICK ON THE LOWER LEFT HAND CORNER “TRANSLATE” TAB TO FIND YOURS! By Jeff J. Brown Right here, it takes just a second… Support my many hours of research and articles on CRRS via FundRazr! FundRazr also accepts bank cards, PayPal, with recurring or one-time contributions https://fundrazr.com/CRRS_2021_fundraiser?ref=a…
 
Wendigos are said to be terrifying humanoid cannibals from the Great Lakes region of the Midwest and Canada. In this episode we discuss the origins of the wendigo myth, wendigo psychosis, and our theories on alleged wendigo sightings. Promo at end of episode from 3 Spooked Girls! To see our sources for this episode, head to our website at spookysci…
 
My little sister, Adele Schott, is tough. She's raising kids and cows all at the same time. With her sons, 2 month old Ira and 2 year old Hank in tow, Adele and her husband have recently started a ranch of their own. Mother's Day is just around the corner, and in this episode, we cover what it was like growing up on a ranch, how to raise the next g…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4pnYYat2_8g&t=120s Guest: Jacqueline Keeler is a Dine/Ihanktonwan Dakota writer. She is the author of Standoff: [1]Standing Rock, the Bundy Movement, and the American Story of Sacred Lands and the editor of the anthology Edge of Morning: Native Voices Speak for the Bears Ears. She is the editor-in-chief of Pollen Nat…
 
For the Many: American Feminists and the Global Fight for Democratic Equality (Princeton University Press, 2021) presents an inspiring look at how US women and their global allies pushed the nation and the world toward justice and greater equality for all. Reclaiming social democracy as one of the central threads of American feminism, Dorothy Sue C…
 
We commonly ascribe beliefs and similar attitudes to groups. For instance, we say that a foreign government believes that members of the press are spies, or that a corporation denies that its product is harmful to the environment. Sometimes, it seems that in such cases, we are simply ascribing to the group the shared beliefs of its members. But the…
 
Why do we keep trying to solve poverty with technology? What makes us feel that we need to learn to code--or else? In The Promise of Access: Technology, Inequality, and the Political Economy of Hope (MIT Press, 2021), Daniel Greene argues that the problem of poverty became a problem of technology in order to manage the contradictions of a changing …
 
Cinderella stories captured the imagination of girls in the 1950s, when dreams of meeting the right man could seem like a happy ending, a solution to life's problems. But over the next fifty years women's lives were transformed, not by the magic wand of a fairy godmother, nor by marrying princes, but by education, work, birth control--and feminism.…
 
In August 1960, a Soviet colonel called Oleg Penkovsky contacted the West to offer to work as a 'soldier warrior for the free world. MI6 and the CIA ran Penkovsky jointly, in an operation that ran through the showdown over Berlin and the Cuban Missile Crisis. He provided crucial intelligence, including photographs of rocket manuals that helped Kenn…
 
In this episode of Horns of a Dilemma, Sean McFate, senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and professor of strategy at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, discusses his book The New Rules of War: How America Can Win Against Russia, China, and Other Threats. McFate argues that the lack of strategic success achieved by the U.S. militar…
 
In his new book Esoteric Islam in Modern French Thought: Massignon, Corbin, Jambet (Bloomsbury Academic Press, 2021) Ziad Elmarsafy maps the intellectual and personal genealogies of three French specialists of Islam, Louis Massignon, Henry Corbin, and Christian Jambet and the ways in which esoteric Islam, be it Sufism, Shi‘ism and/or Islamic philos…
 
The ghettos established by the Nazis in German-occupied Eastern Europe during the Second World War have mainly been seen as lawless spaces marked by brutality, tyranny, and the systematic murder of the Jewish population. Drawing on examples from the Warsaw, Lodz, and Vilna ghettos, Dance on the Razor's Edge: Crime and Punishment in the Nazi Ghettos…
 
Mary Brazelton’s new book, Mass Vaccination: Citizens’ Bodies and State Power in Modern China (Cornell UP, 2019) could hardly be more timely. During the Covid-19 pandemic, China was in the headlines of Euro-American media as the site of the first cases of the disease. China is also centerstage in Brazelton’s insightful, antiracist book—not as a sou…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iut-YvphUVE Guest: Aviva Chomsky is a professor of history and the coordinator of Latin American Studies at Salem State University. She is the author of several books, including Undocumented, They Take Our Jobs!, and most recently, Central America's Forgotten History: Revolution, Violence, and the Roots of Migration.…
 
What do you ask a novelist who has won a Pulitzer, a Guggenheim, and a MacArthur genius grant? Cocktail advice, of course. When I had the honor of chatting with Viet Thanh Nguyen about his two novels The Sympathizer and The Committed, we started by discussing what beverages would go well with his books. While the first book is a spy novel and the s…
 
Elise K. Burton’s important book, Genetic Crossroads: The Middle East and the Science of Human Heredity (Stanford University Press, 2021), documents how race and nation became fused in concept and in political practice. Over the past century, nation-building and race-making became interdependent through the sciences of heredity and their uses durin…
 
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