show episodes
 
Indian Genes is committed to bringing in ideas and thoughts from global leaders in their field to every listener and home, with the intention of providing free and easy access to this information to all that would want to continue their quest for continuous learning. We also are very focused on our young talent that would benefit from this exposure as they plan and move ahead in the careers and life path, hopefully inspiring them to greater heights and clarity in thought that builds both cha ...
 
Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
 
Exploring the coolest and most incredible stuff in science, from way back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth to a future where humans live in space! Fun Kids Science Weekly is hosted by Dan and is the perfect science podcast for kids and families everywhere. Each week, you'll find episodes from series like Deep Space High, Age of the Dinosaurs and Professor Hallux. There's also a special guest, top experts answering all your science questions and Dangerous Dan - something scientific that’s also ...
 
Delve into topical issues in zoology, conservation and the environment, from saving species and protecting the planet, to finding out about the animals living across the globe, including in London’s own river Thames. Learn more about the science behind the conservation work being done by ZSL and others, in this podcast from ZSL’s Institute of Zoology. Hosted by Dr Monni Böhm.
 
Foundering is a new serialized podcast from the journalists at Bloomberg Technology. Each season, Foundering brings you inside a different high-stakes drama from Silicon Valley, where its companies are wielding unprecedented capital and power.
 
This podcast is about wheither we should or shouldnt bring back extinct animals. yes and no. Yes because the term "species does not just conclued animals, but plants! The reason why we should bring back extinct plants is becuase they can help with the biggest problem we are facing on earth right now, global warming. According to livescience.com In warmer temperatures, it was revealed, plants emit more of the gases that stick to aerosol particles. These can lead to cloud formation and, as a r ...
 
Welcome to the world's #1 essential oils podcast –– where each week, we demystify the world of aromatherapy and make essential oils your no-brainer approach to just about everything. Explore how to use essential oils for better health, toxin-free living, DIY projects, skincare, weight loss, emotional and spiritual health, and more.
 
Mo Rocca has always loved obituaries. In season 1 of Mobituaries he introduces listeners to the people who have long intrigued him—from the 20th century’s greatest entertainer … to the Civil Rights pioneer who is completely forgotten … to sitcom characters gone all too soon. Even if you know the names, you’ve never understood why they matter…until now. And if you enjoy these episodes, look for more stories of great lives worth reliving when Mobituaries returns for season 2 in fall 2019.
 
This course examines the human species from a biological perspective, and is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to the field of physical (also called biological) anthropology. As one of the four major fields of anthropology, an understanding of physical anthropology is essential to anyone interested in the discipline, or anyone interested in what it means to be human. In this course, we will investigate the various approaches and methods used by physical anthropologists to exam ...
 
Welcome to Breakfast in Beauclair, a global Witcher podcast. Every episode, host Alyssa of GoodMorhen sits with a new guest to discuss Andrzej Sapkowski’s The Witcher Universe. Join our international hanza as we accompany the witcher, Geralt of Rivia, and his destiny, Cirilla of Cintra, on their journeys across The Continent. New episodes every other Thursday.
 
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show series
 
Accountability is the topic of the day in Canberra, as scandals rock the upper echelons of government-owned entities; After a long wait, the United Nations' treaty banning nuclear weapons is set to enter into force; A small band of maverick breeders are taking the extinction crisis in the United Kingdom into their own hands.…
 
Why was Thomas Jefferson embarrassed about American animals? Are there moose in New Zealand? What is the only weapon in the universe that doubles as a hearing aid? Recording of my live lecture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bnpUnkwLyU Bibliography: https://docs.google.com/document/d/14Em2fnOkQvkDtmo8C-ASwlqsFyXjnihamYsQMm1K_gk/edit?usp=sharing…
 
You’re going to be surprised how little we discuss ALF in this week’s episodes, despite covering the Alien Species Wiki. Random pages include Numlox and Phlegmak, Gnarltree, and Mothman. Matt: mastodon.cloud/@mattherron Louisa: mastodon.xyz/@Louisa Jeff: mastodon.social/@jeffjk Please rate, review, and subscribe to our podcast and follow us on Twit…
 
Halloween is a month-long thing these days and always keen to exploit a commercial holiday we are watching a horror film in mid October- it's Species! Alex is really impressed with the teamwork on display whilst Sam and Chris are unsure about some of the scientific leaps being made. Also, killer squirrels. Again. Next week weirdo '60s italian scifi…
 
Rob, TheUndeadGamr, from England returns to join Alyssa from GoodMorhen for the second half of our discussion of “Rare Species”, the sixth episode in season one of Netflix’s The Witcher. Very important bits include: “The Eyck Show”, Ciri’s storyline, the opportunity to translate philosophy and morality to the adaption, practical effects, a detailed…
 
"…when I say people had no idea, these were investors, right? These were people who thought they had a crystal ball on the future. And I was like, look, our world has to change for so many reasons. The fact that we're slaughtering animals and doing so in really horrific ways, that is not the future. And so, if that is not the future, what is? It's …
 
Episode 25. In this episode, we hear from Shakira about the importance of providing nonhuman animal care during and after rescue and liberation. Shakira calls for more work to be done in the vegan community, so that more humans feel empowered to become involved in this aspect of liberation. Nonhuman animal care is itself a form of activism. Shakira…
 
When we study life, past or present, we talk a lot about species, their evolution, their diversity, their extinction, and more. But we don’t often slow down to discuss what we really mean by that. What is a species? How and where do new species arise? It turns out this topic is much more complicated – and controversial! – than it may seem. In this …
 
This parasitic plant consists of just flashy flowers and creepy suckers With only four known species , Langsdorffia are thieves stripped down to their essentials Supreme grifters of the plant kingdom send up showy flowers ( Langsdorffia hypogaea male, left; female, right) but don't bother with even a single green leaf.…
 
In Gilded Age America, people and animals lived cheek-by-jowl in environments that were dirty and dangerous to man and animal alike. The industrial city brought suffering, but it also inspired a compassion for animals that fueled a controversial anti-cruelty movement. From the center of these debates, Henry Bergh launched a shocking campaign to gra…
 
On this month’s episode, Alex and Simona were meant to discuss non-native species in the archaeological record. What actually happened is a mix of exotic pets, headphone-wearing animals and helpful ancient Roman advice. Links https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/05/150525-ancient-egypt-zoo-pets-hierakonpolis-baboons-archaeology/ https://www…
 
Todd & Brian discuss whether the "divine" human species is in fact both bipolar and invasive, the difficulties that come from gazing into the Abyss, and moral imperatives vs. self-righteousness: how narcissistic morality becomes naked authoritarianism. Also, where solutions to the informational anarchy crisis must begin, when the ends smother the m…
 
Unfortunately fear and anxiety are very real emotions for so many people in today’s society, and they can often hold you back from doing things you want or need to do. What is so important though is making sure they don’t affect your overall health and wellbeing! This week bestselling author, award-winning journalist, and functional practitioner Jo…
 
For everyone interested in the enduring appeal of Louis Kahn, this book demonstrates that a close look at how Kahn put his buildings together will reveal a deeply felt philosophy. Louis I. Kahn is one of the most influential and poetic architects of the twentieth century, a figure whose appeal extends beyond the realm of specialists. In this book, …
 
Born around 1820, Augusta Browne was a pianist, organist, composer, music pedagogue, entrepreneur, music critic, and writer. In Augusta Browne: Composer and Woman of Letters in Nineteenth-Century America (University of Rochester Press, 2020), author Bonny Miller contextualizes the life and career of this remarkable woman who built a public career t…
 
Medical marijuana laws have spread across the U.S. to all but a handful of states. Yet, eighty years of social stigma and federal prohibition creates dilemmas for patients who participate in state programs. Michelle Newhart and William Dolphin's The Medicalization of Marijuana: Legitimacy, Stigma, and the Patient Experience (Routledge, 2018) takes …
 
Todd & Brian return discussing the direct parallels between ideological and theological religion and what Dan Carlin calls The Heat: trivial outrage manufactured to manipulate media consumers for advertising profits, and how it affects us as a society. And, does it matter if our outrage triggers are fake? Is social media contributing to a literal d…
 
In EP 13, we continue where we left off in EP 12 and Bernardo Kasturp dives deeper into consciousness and how this is central to our understanding of the world around us. He also answers questions posted on line and fascinates us with insights that are thought provoking and brilliant. THis is an episode that would be enjoyed as a continuation of EP…
 
Welcome ... to Spookulative Evolution. It’s October once again and time for Spook-E! Each episode throughout this month, we’re choosing a monster and discussing how it – or something like – might evolve biologically, pulling inspiration from critters of the real world. This month’s theme: sea monsters. This episode, we explore a monster whose name …
 
Ellen Wayland-Smith is an associate professor of writing at University of Southern California. Her book The Angel in the Marketplace: Adwoman Jean Wade Rindlaub and the Selling of America (University of Chicago Press, 2020) follows the career of adwoman Jean Wade Rindlaub who in the mid-twentieth century created the advertising campaigns selling co…
 
Architect Alfred Waugh is designing Indigenous spaces on campuses, to help establish a sense of identity for Indigenous people on Canada’s universities.As a hospital chaplain, Jeff Braff, used his knowledge as a former infectious disease epidemiologist and a Buddhist monk, with which to comfort patients.…
 
If you contracted COVID will you then be protected from further infections and illness from SARS-CoV-2 in the future? We’re starting to hear about cases of people being infected by the novel coronavirus for a second time. A handful of these cases have been published in peer reviewed journals. Nottingham University’s Professor of Virology Jonathan B…
 
Google "Czechia" and you'll find my article in Forbes. Although it has about 200,000 views, a few outliers are still resisting the name Czechia. They cling to The Czech Republic name as stubbornly as they cling to their Czech beer in a pub. In this WanderLearn episode (#112), I talk with two Czechs: Petr Pavlinek: Professor of Geography at the Univ…
 
Aboriginal health leaders have triumphed over Covid, but we are not hearing much about this success story. Professor Fiona Stanley celebrates that achievement, in a wide-ranging interview about ideas for a healthier and better society, and about her life's work.Professor Stanley is an epidemiologist and pioneering researcher who has focussed on the…
 
The breathless pace of China’s economic reform has brought about deep ruptures in socioeconomic structures and people’s inner landscape. Faced with increasing market-driven competition and profound social changes, more and more middle-class urbanites are turning to Western-style psychological counseling to grapple with their mental distress. Anxiou…
 
Why Give a Damn About Strangers? In his book The Kindness of Strangers: How a Selfish Ape Invented a New Moral Code (Basic Books, 2020), Michael E. McCullough explains. McCullough is a professor of psychology at the University of California San Diego, where he directs the Evolution and Human Behavior laboratory. Long interested in prosocial behavio…
 
Tauntauns are special creatures. Unless they're digitally created monsters that make no sense in the context of the movie plot, whatever that is. Gerry the Canon Junkie of The Bombadcast guest voices a spectacular character in this excellent episode about perhaps the deepest character story of any Sith in Star Wars history, Darth Treya.…
 
Maria Hinojosa is an award-winning journalist who, for nearly thirty years, has reported on stories and communities in America that often go ignored by the mainstream media—from tales of hope in the South Bronx to the unseen victims of the War on Terror and the first detention camps in the US. Bestselling author Julia Álvarez has called her “one of…
 
In 1618, on the eve of the Thirty Years’ War, the German alchemist and physician Michael Maier published Atalanta fugiens, an intriguing and complex musical alchemical emblem book designed to engage the ear, eye, and intellect. The book unfolds as a series of fifty emblems, each of which contains an accompanying "fugue" music scored for three voice…
 
In the decades since it was identified in 1981, HIV/AIDS has devastated African American communities. Members of those communities mobilized to fight the epidemic and its consequences from the beginning of the AIDS activist movement. They struggled not only to overcome the stigma and denial surrounding a "white gay disease" in Black America, but al…
 
It's that time of year again. We're returning to Haddonfield and picking up right where the original Halloween left off to continue our investigation into Michael Myers. By the filmmakers own admission, Halloween II is a movie that was made for financial reasons, not creative ones. John Carpenter had such a difficult time coming up with a suitable …
 
How a Croydon housewife baffled a 1930s ghost hunter - the author of The Suspicions of Mr Whicher, Kate Summerscale, talks to Matthew Sweet about her discovery of a dossier of interviews about a poltergeist "terrorising" Alma Fielding which made headlines in the 1938 Sunday Pictorial newspaper.30 artists interested in seances and spirituality are o…
 
Let’s face it - the liver is not one of the organs we tend to think about when focusing on our health. What you may not realize is that maintaining a healthy liver will have a significant impact on your overall well being! In this episode we talk with Debra Reis, a Clinical Nurse Specialist and Certified Clinical Aromatherapist, and explore her per…
 
What if outer space is not outside the human environment but, rather, defines it? This is the unusual starting point of Valerie Olson’s Into the Extreme: U.S. Environmental Systems and Politics Beyond Earth (U Minnesota Press, 2018), revealing how outer space contributes to making what counts as the scope and scale of today’s natural and social env…
 
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