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Singularity.FM is the 1st and best singularity podcast - the place where we interview the future! Singularity.FM is a series of podcast interviews with the best scientists, writers, entrepreneurs, philosophers and artists, debating the technological singularity. The podcast is a conversation about exponential tech, accelerating change, artificial intelligence and ethics: Because technology is not enough!
 
Translation is the process of turning basic scientific research into therapies that cure disease, new sources of energy that heal the planet, and other things that move the world forward. The Translation podcast takes a deep dive into scientific advancements with a huge potential to improve society. We talk directly with the people advancing the science with their own hands and minds, and focus on how we can translate the science from the bench to the benefit of all. Initially centered on bi ...
 
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ReWriting the Human Story: How Our Story Determines Our Future an alternative thought experiment by Nikola Danaylov Chapter 3: The Power of Story We suffer not from the events in our lives but from our stories about them. Epictetus The most powerful stories are stories about things that don’t exist. Because our fictive language gave birth […]…
 
First, Moderna and Pfizer are poised to make billions of dollars from their Covid-19 vaccines this year, and we discuss what that massive infusion of cash portends for both companies. Next, Thomas Bollyky of the Council on Foreign Relations joins us to explain what the U.S.'s support for waiving Covid-19 vaccine patents means — and doesn’t mean — f…
 
First, STAT Washington correspondent Rachel Cohrs joins us to explain why President Biden's endorsement for drug pricing reform rang hollow to many advocates. Next, virologist Angela Rasmussen calls in to discuss the controversy around a Russian-produced vaccine for Covid-19. Finally, STAT's Kate Sheridan joins us to talk about how a shortage of ch…
 
ReWriting the Human Story: How Our Story Determines Our Future an alternative thought experiment by Nikola Danaylov Chapter 1: The Definition of Story We started our thought experiment with Kenneth Burke’s definition of story as “equipment for living.” Burke offers a great start but it is Jeff DeChambeau who really brings all the essential elements…
 
First, Northwestern University epidemiologist Mercedes Carnethon joins us to weigh on the nation's latest Covid-19 debate: Is it OK to go maskless outdoors? Then, STAT Washington correspondent Nicholas Florko calls in to talk about why the Biden administration is waiting so long to nominate an FDA commissioner and how that indecision could have rea…
 
It is harder and harder to make sense of life. Everything is changing, all the time, at a faster and faster pace. Our civilization is struggling to keep up with exponential technology and disruptive change. Our age-old institutions, politics, economics, ethics, religion and laws, even our environment, are so fundamentally challenged, that we risk c…
 
How do you describe a one-in-a-million risk? What's heparin-induced thrombocytopenia? And why's it so hard to find drugs for Covid-19?We cover all that and more this week on “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. First, Science Magazine reporter Kai Kupferschmidt joins us to discuss the U.S. decision to press pause on the Johnson & Johnson vac…
 
What's next for AstraZeneca? Are there any right answers when it comes to compassionate use? And how does it feel to give someone a Covid-19 vaccine?We cover all that and more this week on “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. First, we discuss the latest in a long series of issues for AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine and the implications for t…
 
First, STAT’s Mario Aguilar joins us to discuss a fascinating experiment in Nevada, where one city is giving its residents free access to a therapy app — and getting a mixed reception. Then, New York University antitrust expert Eleanor Fox calls in to discuss the case of Illumina, the genome sequencing giant whose grand plans keeping running afoul …
 
We're devoting this week's episode to the week of whiplash news about AstraZeneca's Covid-19 vaccine, subject of a baffling international incident with consequences still unfolding. First, we explain the series of late-night announcements that made global headlines. Then, our STAT colleague Helen Branswell joins us to discuss the implications for A…
 
First we unpack the crisis of confidence facing AstraZeneca's Covid-19 vaccine in Europe with Alison Buttenheim, a University Pennsylvania professor who studies vaccine acceptance. Then, we explain the latest data on an Alzheimer's disease treatment from Eli Lilly and why it has polarized experts in the field. Finally, we make a modest proposal to …
 
We're joined by Natasha Loder, the health policy editor at The Economist — and a London resident — to get her home-country perspective on the U.K.'s Covid vaccine development efforts. Next, we'll talk with STAT national technology correspondent Casey Ross about his yearslong investigation into the demise of Watson Health, IBM's AI health care initi…
 
We discuss Merck's decision to help Johnson & Johnson manufacture vaccine doses and whether it'll be a turning point for the drug industry or a relic of Covid-19 history. Then, as we near the one-year anniversary of the pandemic, STAT's Andrew Joseph joins us to explain what experts think is in store in the months and years to come. Finally, Ashish…
 
First, pediatric cancer advocate Nancy Goodman joins us to discuss why she believes Covid-19 vaccine trials need to be sped up for teens and children. Then, Wall Street Journal reporter Greg Zuckerman calls in to explain the unlikely story behind Novavax, a former biotech penny stock now on the verge of making history. Finally, we embark on a light…
 
Whether it's Multiple Sclerosis, Type 1 Diabetes, Lupus, or Crohn's Disease, autoimmunity is a rapidly growing problem that traditional pharmaceuticals have failed to completely cure. While these diseases have very different symptoms, they all have the same root cause -- the body’s immune system is attacking its own healthy organs. Lurking within o…
 
We discuss all that and more this week on “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. First, we break down a significant setback for Bluebird Bio’s gene therapy program with some help from Akshay Sharma, a bone marrow transplant expert at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Then, STAT's Kate Sheridan joins us to discuss her deep dive into Flagsh…
 
Engineered T cells that hunt and kill blood cancers have recently obtained three landmark FDA approvals, forever changing the way we treat this disease. Even with its massive clinical success, these cells come with life-threatening neurotoxicities. But is neurotoxicity a set feature of using T cell therapies or is our engineering accidentally targe…
 
When will we have enough vaccine doses? How many effective Covid-19 drugs are just waiting to be found? And what do Redditors think about biotech?We discuss all that and more this week on “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. First, we check in with our colleague Helen Branswell for her view on the current state of the Covid-19 pandemic and t…
 
Small molecules are a pillar of human health, making up a majority of the drugs we have in our healthcare arsenal. Many of these drugs are obtained by utilizing synthetic chemistry to modify the composition of some small molecule found in nature. Derivatives of tropane alkaloids, for example, alleviate neuromuscular disorders and are derived from a…
 
We discuss all that and more this week on “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. First, we recap a busy week of news, featuring 23andMe's move to go public through a blank-check company, Merck CEO Ken Frazier's retirement after three decades at the drug maker, and how the future of Biogen’s Alzheimer’s disease drug got a little more complicate…
 
Bacteria are rapidly evolving ways to resist antibiotics, causing minor infections to become life-threatening events. Compounding the problem, new antibiotics have been incredibly challenging to develop and pharma is economically disincentivized to invest in finding them. James Martin and his colleagues Joseph Sheehan and Benjamin Bratton took on t…
 
First, we discuss the implications of Johnson & Johnson’s any-day-now data on a one-shot vaccine for Covid-19. Then, Kevin Davies, executive editor of the CRISPR Journal, joins us to talk about the strange boom in genome editing stocks and the future of the revolutionary technology. Finally, we talk to Megan Ranney, an emergency room physician and …
 
Dr. Gus Hosein is a 20+year-veteran of Privacy International. So to say that he knows a lot about privacy will be an understatement. But his knowledge is not merely academic. Gus and his scrappy team of privacy crusaders have fought the long and hard war while putting everything on the line, over and over again. […]…
 
Hundreds of iterations of immune cells that are engineered to kill cancer have already been designed. Corina reached outside of this box to use the same synthetic biology principles to engineer T cells to attack senescent cells, a cell type that contributes to diseases of aging. Corina walks us through how her engineered T cells know the difference…
 
We're spending this entire episode remembering Sharon Begley, our revered and beloved colleague who died last week from complications of lung cancer. First, STAT's Eric Boodman joins us to discuss Sharon's path-breaking career and what he learned from reporting out her obituary. Then, a trio of STAT editors call in to talk about what it was like to…
 
Though admittedly posthumanist, Francesca Ferrando‘s Philosophical Posthumanism is the best book on transhumanism that I have read so far. I believe that it is a must-read for transhumanists and non-transhumanists alike. In fact, one can argue that Ferrando’s book ranks right up there with the very best not only on the transhuman, but also on […]…
 
We're devoting this episode to the news coming out of the just-concluded J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference, the drug industry's largest annual meeting. First, we'll dissect Eli Lilly's surprising data on a new Alzheimer's disease treatment and dig into its implications for the field. Then, we discuss whether there's a bubble inflating in the genome…
 
Kim Stanley Robinson has an asteroid named after him. The reason for that is simple: Stan, as he’s often known among people who know him, is one of the best known contemporary authors of classic [hard] science fiction. He has written 20 books that have been translated into 25 languages and has won pretty much […]…
 
On this year's first episode, STAT Washington correspondent Lev Facher joins us to break down the implications of a Democrat-controlled Senate. Then, our colleague Erin Brodwin calls in to talk about CES, the massive tech conference taking place next week. Finally, we chat with Bob Nelsen, a biotech venture capitalist and one of the few people who …
 
Dr. Matthew Cole is the only vegan sociologist that I know of. His unique point of view on veganism, especially its implications with respect to ethics, transhumanism, and the application of technology, has already left a mark on the way I perceive the small challenges of being vegan as an opportunity for personal discipline and […]…
 
Thomas Homer-Dixon is one of Canada’s most celebrated intellectuals. Luckily, he was also one of my Professors at the University of Toronto whose class on complexity has left an indelible mark on me. So when I heard that after a long break Homer-Dixon is publishing a new book on climate change I simply had to […]…
 
Maria Farrell is the author of some of my most favorite op-ed pieces of 2020. She is very smart, gutsy, genuine, feisty, generous, and Irish. Her writing is sharper, it penetrates deeper and she’s not afraid to go further than most others. I have already learned a lot from her and have become a total […]…
 
Glen Hiemstra has been a futurist for close to 40 years. But if you think his specialty is forecasting the future then you’d be wrong. No. Hiemstra’s focus has not been on the most probable, or even the possible future. Instead, Glen has chosen to focus consistently on what he calls “the preferred future.” This […]…
 
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