show episodes
 
A pop culture time machine! Each episode covers that very week from 30 years ago, 20 years ago and 10 years ago, which means each show is loaded with forgotten movies, timeless TV episodes and songs best left to the past. We'll examine TV, movies, music and video games from the 80s, 90s and 2000s. Come remember with us!
 
Join Dave and Elise every week for a buggy-ride of cinematic exploration. A bilingual Montreal native and a Prairies hayseed gravitate to Toronto for the film culture, meet on OK Cupid, and spur on each other's movie-love, culminating in this podcast. Expect in-depth discussion of their old favourites (mostly studio-era Hollywood) and their latest frontiers (courtesy of the TIFF Cinematheque and various Toronto rep houses and festivals). The podcast will be comprised of several potentially n ...
 
We love videogames….and comics…..and movies…..and…..well I guess we just love fiction and we have a lot to say about it. Everything means something. Our passion for these mediums leads us to pull about the intricacies of their stories, and mechanics. We provide analysis, editorials and reviews of our favorite works of pop culture. Okay…. Good. Now that we got all that pretentious, grown-up, business fluff out of the way, a lot of the modern art we love is weird, strange and well, dumb. The i ...
 
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show series
 
Roger looks like a Budda for a few moments.No preambleDinner party behaviourPersonal introductions by the podcasters.'The best dinner party I ever heard of":PARTY FOR TIME-TRAVELLERSWhy do people not come to your business?Did the information reach the people for whom it was relevant?Going backwards in search of something valuable.Going forward into…
 
Oct. 23-29: Kirstie Alley sexes men to death, James Gandolfini is a fake dad, Nora Ephron’s luck runs out, Stephen King’s got a rat problem, RDJ heads to TV, Don Johnson gets steamy, Susan Sarandon is the older woman, monsters destroy Mexico, and Chris Farley is the world’s sexiest dancer. All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, your week…
 
MGM, 1934, and our most mismatched pair of films yet: Sidney Franklin's tale of overheated Victorian repression, The Barretts of Wimpole Street, and Lubitsch's lavish, Hollywood-transposed Austro-Hungarian operetta, The Merry Widow. We discuss Laughton vs. Gielgud, Lubitsch vs. Mamoulian, innuendo in the Year of the Code, and more. Time Codes: 0h 0…
 
Oct. 16-22: Tom Selleck goes down under, Damon Wayans does blackface, Haley Joel Osment pays it forward, Matt Damon visits the afterlife, Brendan Fraser sells his soul, too much Limp Bizkit, Timothy Olyphant is extremely attractive to men and women. All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, your weekly look back on the week that was 30, 20,…
 
On this Acteurist Oeuvre-view Setsuko Hara episode: a tight, noirish family melodrama by Ozu, Tokyo Twilight (1957), paired with a loose, sprawling family melodrama by Naruse, Daughters, Wives and a Mother (1960). The first gives us the bitterest Hara we've seen since The Idiot, while the second challenges her persona in subtler ways. Vacuum cleane…
 
Oct. 9-15: Joan Allen should be vice president, Winona Ryder looks for her mom, Memphis Belle fights Nazis, Tim Meadows gets a movie, The Simpsons return, Andrew Garfield is a clone, Ryan Reynolds is buried, Bruce Willis is a retired hit-man, and Bronies begin. All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, your weekly look back on the week that…
 
A new year, 1934, and our first studio, Paramount, shows its ability with satire and sympathy for the underdog. It's the Year of the Code, but that doesn't seem to have much applicability to our two films, Cecil B. DeMille's feminist jungle adventure comedy Four Frightened People and Mitchell Leisen's occasionally noirish revenge drama, Behold My W…
 
How will others choose to fill the holes in your communication?"Gaps between your words allow others to understand better", Paul says.Roger fills the anxious space by imagining himself the victim of bureaucratic injustice and serving 30 years in a maximum security prison.NCT (annual roadworthy test) for Roger's car.Babies, kittens, puppies & butter…
 
Oct. 2-8: Steven Seagal whips his hair, we learn a new zip code in Beverly Hills, Bjork makes a musical, CSI debuts, Secretariat doesn’t star Bojack Horseman, Kandi arrives, Henry Miller is NC-17, Abed goes on a background adventure, Colin Farrell goes to ‘Nam, and the Gilmore Girls bond over piles of dialogue. All that and more this week on Thirty…
 
In this Setsuko Hara Acteurist Oeuvre-view, two films by Mikio Naruse, The Sound of the Mountain (1954) and Sudden Rain (1956). We discuss the ways that the casting of Setsuko Hara in the first film seems to respond to Ozu's "Noriko trilogy" (especially Tokyo Story, although it was released only two months later), and the overt feminism of the subt…
 
We just KNOW you are going to LOVE what is in the podcast because we LOVED putting it in there. That meant finding a gorgeous SUN-DRENCHED recording location with podcast hosts who LOVE what they do making FABBY DELICIOUS YUMMY speech for your ears from carefully nurtured thoughts that form spontaneously in their minds, which they ship to YOU over …
 
Sept. 25-Oct. 1: Dolph Lundgren fights space pushers, Christopher Walken in king of New York, the next-to-last picture show, don’t rent to Michael Keaton, America fails to learn from the Civil War, Denzel remembers the titans, two explorations of Facebook, and should you let in the vampire remake? All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, y…
 
Universal, 1933: Two little-known James Whale Pre-Codes that adopt divergent attitudes toward adulterous wives. First, treated as farce, in By Candlelight: Paul Lukas plays a butler who gets himself in trouble by masquerading as his playboy boss in order to have more refined erotic adventures. Then, treated as tragedy, in The Kiss Before the Mirror…
 
Sept. 18-24: Burt Reynolds comes to TV, Kate Hudson rocks out, we meet TV’s Frank, Chris Elliot gets a life, Penelope Cruz gets on top, Steve Guttenberg becomes Lobo, Zach Snyder likes owls, Steve Buscemi is a bootlegger, Donald Glover isn’t Spider-Man, and Joe Pesci is a wise guy. All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, your weekly look …
 
This week we've got a big one for you: the five films that Frank Capra and Barbara Stanwyck made together. Starting with LADIES OF LEISURE (1930), we interpret the Stanwyck character as the Capra stand-in, which leads to some interesting results. MEET JOHN DOE (1941) becomes LADIES OF LEISURE inverted (Stanwyck as artist, Cooper as model—but Stanwy…
 
A hot topic. (The hottest of all time?) How can humans save their mothership?Human beings are social animals. They are joined in a great collective endeavour. Together they are destroying the world so that they can't live on it any longer. It is a huge success so far.Can they be stopped? (Do they want to be stopped?)Paul discovers the answer among …
 
Sept. 11-17: Sean Penn is a gangster, Clint Eastwood hunts elephants, Capt. Planet uses the power of heart, a new generation of Looney Tunes, Huey Lewis is a karaoke hustler, Cribs goes behind the scenes, Ben Affleck goes to town, and we learn that In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important grou…
 
RKO 1933: We look at a movie starring one of the hottest female stars of the day, Constance Bennett, George Cukor's Our Betters, and a movie starring an up-and-coming (and down, and up, and down again) RKO star, Katharine Hepburn, Lowell Sherman's Morning Glory. Elise deems both Hepburn's frantically vulnerable performance and Cukor's unsentimental…
 
Sept. 4-10: Nurse Betty is not for everybody, Ryan Philippe is a kidnapper, Disney and Fox launch their afternoon animation blocks, Resident Evil has an afterlife, Joaquin Phoenix is still here, Britney and Madonna slay the VMAs, Michael Rooker and Keanu Reeves are serial killers, and George Michael wants freedom. All that and more this week on Thi…
 
Roger is wrong! (Gasp!)Paul schools Roger about the business of education, and advocates tearing up school copy books.Teenagers revolt, parents are disengaged—but schools do what they should? (Find out.)Companies are delighted with the fodder the school systems are producing for the corporate meat grinders? (Find out.)Are tax payers happy? (Don't l…
 
A strange back-to-school episode for a strange back-to-school year: we look at Amy Heckerling's LOSER (2000) and Whit Stillman's DAMSELS IN DISTRESS (2011), two comedies with very different, but equally dark, visions of class and university life in America, neither of which fared well with audiences or critics at the time. Dave defends the former a…
 
Aug. 28-Sept. 3: Anjelica Huston traumatizes children, Charlie and Emilio are garbage, the better Ferris Bueller TV show, Donal Logue is a stud, Stephen Dorff is a cinema terrorist, George Clooney mopes around Italy, Machete don’t text, LL Cool J will knock you out, and Brad Pitt wants a new caravan for his mom. All that and more this week on Thirt…
 
This episode of our Acteurist Oeuvre-view of Setsuko Hara (with English subs) features our first Naruse, REPAST (1951), and the movie generally considered “Ozu's masterpiece” (as if there were only one), TOKYO STORY (1953). We debate whether REPAST is housewife propaganda or the STARSHIP TROOPERS of domestic reunion dramas, and ask whether a cat ca…
 
Aug. 21-27: Christian Slater hits pirate radio, Liam Neeson gets a new face, the first winner of Survivor, Jane’s Addiction goes to the market, Ferris Bueller goes to TV, Vincent D’Onofrio is from the future, two hidden horror gems, Richard Dreyfuss is an old gangster, Akira Kurosawa has a dream, we lose a blues legend, Spike Lee returns to New Orl…
 
It starts badly. 81 people gather under a cloud of suspicion. Did they play golf? One person resigned their ministerial post out of embarrassment. (Maybe their round was dreadful?)Next, Paul and Roger talk about the appeal of using opposites to confuse people and attract their attention.Roger feels a like a packet of cat treats wants to take him on…
 
Fox, 1933: we watch a couple of movies that complicate Ethan Mordden's characterization of Fox as “The Rube,” Henry King's State Fair and William (billed as Wilhelm) Dieterle's The Devil's in Love (both beautifully shot by Hal Mohr). The first is a sophisticated movie about simple people that doesn't make fun of them or take unsophistication as its…
 
Aug. 14-20: Nicolas Cage teams with David Lynch, George C. Scott and Jennifer Lopez go into the minds of killers, The Boondocks are dick ridin’ Obama, a sperm-based rom com, Chris Rock needs to be on HBO Max, and debuts of fancy British cakes and animated kids’ favorites. All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, your weekly look back on th…
 
Our August Special Subject is one of Dave's favourite film books, Elizabeth Kendall's The Runaway Bride: Hollywood Romantic Comedy of the 1930s. We discuss Kendall's vision of romantic comedy from this era (it's powered by an auteur/acteur synergy between erstwhile “gag man” directors and a new type of female star) and consider how each of the film…
 
Should you mind your own business?Did Soundcloud tell us to mind our own business?Who are the most effective English-speaking communicators? (Not Paul, nor Roger.)What makes communication memorable?What was the best way to deliver orders on an 19th century battlefield?These, and many more, questions are barely answered in this episode of Business J…
 
Aug. 7-13: Mel Gibson and RDJ take to the air, Kiefer Sutherland has a good day to die, Julia Roberts eats and prays, it wasn’t Shaggy, Keanu Reeves hits the gridiron while Natasha Lyonne is a cheerleader, Scott Pilgrim defeats the seven evil ex’s — through great casting, and Dee-Lite produces the perfect song. All that and more this week on Thirty…
 
Prepare for Pre-Code shenanigans galore! In our Warner Bros. 1933 Studios Year-By-Year episode, the socialist studio shows us capitalism at its nastiest and sexiest. In Baby Face and Employees' Entrance, Barbara Stanwyck and Warren William, respectively, “crush” and “smash” in the name of surviving and triumphing in the capitalist system, and make …
 
July 31-Aug. 6: Prelude to the Gulf War, Denzel and Spike are mo better, Young Guns go out in a blaze of glory, dancing on a bar is unsanitary, Kathy Griffin leaves the D list, the middle man behind Middle Men, Eric Bana hulks out for the first time, and Geezers! In! Spaaaace! All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, your weekly look back …
 
This time on our oeuvre-view of Setsuko Hara's (English-subtitled) career, Kurosawa's The Idiot/Hakuchi, based on Dostoevsky, is paired with Ozu's Early Summer for maximum tonal dissonance. Our heroine proves her range again—even with her Noriko roles. Join us for a discussion of sexual psychosis and tragic caritas in The Idiot and the perverse obs…
 
July 24-30: Marlon Brando parodies himself, Harrison Ford is presumed innocent, E! hits the air, Baby Blues, cats and dogs living together, Zac Efron has a dead brother, Annette Bening and Julianne Moore are good moms, the Klumps take over, Steve Buscemi goes to prison, Swamp Thing is made on the cheap, TV's favorite high-functioning sociopath, and…
 
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