show episodes
 
Julie Piatt is the leader of the Water Tiger online community and the founder of SriMu artisan, plant-based not-cheese @SriMu. She is the author of books including The Plant Powered Way, with her husband Rich Roll, and This Cheese is Nuts. Her podcast offers spiritual musings on living a life embodied in our true, unique blueprint.
 
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show series
 
In the fast-paced movement of today’s media, it’s easy to become entangled in narratives of extinction, loss, a lack of time, and a tremendous amount of misanthropy. However, when we pause to look within the ecosystems around us we can find examples of life pushing through the most difficult of circumstances. Our more than human kin continues in de…
 
On this episode @SriMati reaches across spiritual horizon to share truths with @serenadyerpisoni and to discuss her book The Knowing: 11 Lessons To Understand The Quiet Urges of Your Soul, written in collaboration with her sister Saje. Serena and SriMati discuss the legacy of Serena's father Wayne Dyer and marvel at our capacity to find peace withi…
 
When we hear about the Green New Deal, it is almost always in context to policy and business within the United States. The urgent push for an energy transition away from fossil fuels often obscures the reality of extractive frontiers and the supply chains that green energy necessitates. This week, we slow down and explore the structures behind “our…
 
In order to limit global temperature from exceeding a 1.5°C increase, we need to cut global emissions by 45% in the next 10 years. However, recent reports indicate that if our current global pledges were enacted, we’d only reduce our emissions by 1%. We are living through what some might define as an ongoing climate emergency, and this will only co…
 
This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with Queen Quet, originally aired in November of 2018. The Anthropocene tells the story of compounding injustice towards people and planet. It tells the story of growth for growth’s sake, living beyond boundaries sacredly assigned to us. In this episode, we are honored to be in dialogue with Queen Quet,…
 
The ubiquity of water is demonstrated in almost everything we come into contact with. It’s responsible for everyday objects like blue jeans, bread, and coffee, it rushes through pipes below our feet, is necessary for industrial violence like fracking, mapped through watersheds, exists as a healing modality, and is also a great source of pleasure - …
 
Environmental and ecological sustainability movements have often negated their complicity in white supremacy, heteronormativity, patriarchy, and capitalism, citing that their pursuits and causes are objectively positive because they are on behalf of the so-called “natural world.” This week on the podcast, we dig deeper into this topic with Guy Rita…
 
“There's no magical return. We're not all going to return to an unblemished time in history, and if we know that...what do we have to do? Who needs to have conversation with whom? Who needs to heal what relationship? Who needs to ask for what permission? Who needs to offer something back?” This week on the podcast, Prentis Hemphill offers us these …
 
This week on the podcast we begin our conversation with Dr. Michael Lujan Bevacqua by discussing Guåhan’s incredibly layered history, as well as the CHamoru history that predates any colonial narrative by thousands of years. With an understanding of how Guåhan (Guam) ended up as a “territory” of the United States, Michael shares the current efforts…
 
We begin this week with reverence for sharks as kin that have inhabited Earth’s waters for 450 million years, an existence that even predates trees. These apex predators embody a deep resilience and commitment to their place in this world, however, like many of the ocean’s inhabitants, sharks cannot handle commercial exploitation at the scale of wh…
 
This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with Pádraig Ó Tuama, originally aired in September of 2019. The Isle of Éire (Ireland) is rich with stories held by the land, both ancient and modern, laden with both fierce culture and colonial violence. Pádraig Ó Tuama perceives these complex layers of history with acute insights into the lingering i…
 
British Columbia’s government has claimed that over 20% of “their” forests still contain old-growth, but a recent independent study found only 2.7% could truly be classified as such. Despite the reality that such little of this ancient ecosystem remains, B.C. government and corporations continue to log across unceded forests. For this reason, in Au…
 
So often fungi are pitched as being at the forefront of innovation, whether being used to create vegan leather, pharmaceuticals, or being incorporated into various biotechnology products, but this fixation on innovation can obscure our ancestral relationship to fungi and the wisdom they can share with us about decomposition. This week, we slow down…
 
This year approximately 42 million people will experience food insecurity in the United States, a perverse number when put in context to the surplus of food many of us have access to. In this week’s episode, we look at the work of Virginia Free Farm with guest Amyrose Foll. By providing free produce, plants, seeds, chicken, and ducks Virginia Free …
 
If we need the Earth, does the Earth need us? This week on the podcast we dive deep into the relationship amongst ourselves and the Earth with guest Tiokasin Ghosthorse. We begin our conversation by talking about the savior mentality that can arise when we act to address the many issues that threaten Earth and kin at this moment. Recognizing the tr…
 
Through the support of ever-growing subsidies, trade deals, and taxes global corporations have ballooned, creating a highly violent, exploitative, and absurd global trade system. So absurd, that often we fixate on the hypocrisy of how it became possible that food packaged and processed on the other side of the world is somehow “cheaper” than that w…
 
Struggling to change actual conditions, many have settled for changing the perceptions of the world around us. On this week’s episode, guest Tyson Yunkaporta begins by sharing the connections between perception, the branding of our identities, and the many forms of capital that become available and valuable in a perception-obsessed society. As we w…
 
On this week’s episode, we observe the impacts of common narratives of escape and place and how those narratives underscore exploitative tourism. Bani Amor guides us through an exploration of how travel can be viewed as an extension of the colonial project and how travel media is largely a product of the patriarchal gaze. We’re invited to criticall…
 
This week’s encore episode, originally broadcast in October of 2017, invites insight into renewed relational understanding of home, sacred rage, and protecting the breathing spaces of public lands. Terry Tempest Williams guides us to explore acts of the imagination as we shift into consciousness and expand our sense of family to both human and wild…
 
Will we “undo” or “solve” climate change? Could we still create a livable world if the answer to the previous question is no? Could we create an even more just world than the one we’ve been living in so far? This week we step away from thinking about climate change at the planetary scale and reflect on how we can respond at the community level with…
 
In this episode @SriMati connects with her great friend Tracee Stanley to share wisdom from Tracee's new book Radiant Rest. They discuss the live giving energy of Yoga Nidra and explore spirituality as the ultimate activism. What does it mean to be awake? Yoga Nidra is known as the Yoga of Sleep. It is a lucid practice that requires no previous exp…
 
Mainstream media has gradually begun to recognize the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit People (MMIWG2S) epidemic across North America, but only after constant attention and pressure from Indigenous communities, advocates, and organization - still, much needs to be addressed as there continues to be serious misrepresentat…
 
Many of us have access to more choices than we ever thought imaginable, in fact, it is quite easy to find ourselves amidst an abundance of products, eating foods cultivated across the world, or selecting from a myriad of variations of the same “thing”. But this “abundance” of choice masks ecological depletion, and as we gain access to that which is…
 
When asked about implementing 5G in 2019, Brussels’ Environment Minister, Celine Fremault was quoted saying “the people of Brussels are not guinea pigs whose health I can sell at a profit. We cannot leave anything to doubt.” Comparatively here in the United States, we are bombarded with advertisements that boast about the speed, accessibility, and …
 
Humans have often turned to the night sky for both practical matters, like direction and orientation, as well as philosophical matters, like making sense of our place in the world and communicating with the ethereal. Despite this ancestral connection, many of us either know very little about the space above us and the galaxies around us, or we don’…
 
In 2018 former Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy, what we didn’t know was that beginning in 2017 the Trump administration ran a secret pilot program that began rapidly separating children from their families in El Paso, Texas. After running this pilot program, Customs and Border …
 
In this episode @SriMati talks down the line with her soul friend, the makeup artist Natasha Severino @natashaseverino_makeup about Natasha's journey onto a healing, spiritual path through the teachings of The Hopi and her subsequent service and Ally-ship. They are using Julie's platform to raise funds for the Hopi via https://gofund.me/0616867f an…
 
We are often reminded of the tremendous amount of loss that transpires every day on this Earth; loss of language, biodiversity, and ancestral knowledge. In response, it’s understandable that many of us may be hyper-fixated on preserving whatever we can and fighting to stave off the mass changes that have been set in motion. But what if we challenge…
 
“We forget that so much is given freely, that this world is meant to be enjoyed.” This week, we heed this powerful reminder by guest Ella Noah Bancroft. As our belief systems have become entwined with the dominant economic structure, we see the commodification of our wellness, intimacy, and connectivity - a phenomenon that is severely hindering our…
 
How can queerness guide us as we move through this liminal time period? How can queer ecology radically change our way of knowing? This week’s episode, initially aired in December of 2018, acknowledges that in order to expand ourselves to our fullest capacity, we must bend beyond the cultural and gender binaries that dominant society projects among…
 
In this episode @SriMati reflects on time spent as the student of gurus in order to explore how we see ourselves in relation to others. We are all seeking love, connection and meaning and we are all informed by our individual experience. So why are we so quick to cancel a person when their belief systems differ from our own? How do we manage disagr…
 
Our attention has operated as currency for the past couple of decades, but with the invasiveness of social media and technology, our ability to exit and enter the attention economy has been severely hindered. As we feel pressure to post and comment on everything for an unknown audience, do we inherently limit our capacity for complexity and vulnera…
 
As so-called powerful “industrial civilizations” continue to decline into dysfunction, unable to care for the vast majority, the call to localize, reinvest in household economies, and strengthen our capacity for self-reliance is becoming emphatic. Amongst failing institutions and the remnants of exploitative wealth, this week’s guest, David Holmgre…
 
Emboldened by the rapid development of technology, a cultural ethos of rugged individualism, globalization, and the monopolization of our media, the era of efficiency in the so-called Global North has significantly altered our communal symbiosis. For many, acts of service that would have once been fulfilled by neighbors and community have now been …
 
In the United States, land ownership is dishonorable no matter how you frame it. For example, 60% of land in the U.S. is owned privately and 30% is owned by the federal government, comparatively tribal nations own about 2.5% of their land. Meanwhile, the Gates family recently became the largest owners of American farmland, owning a total of 260,000…
 
Currently, less than 15% of terrestrial land exists in some form of protected area, the percentage of marine protected areas is significantly lower. It’s undeniable that protecting some of the last vestiges of wild places from industrial decimation is a critical and worthy cause. However, large-scale land conservation projects have also historicall…
 
Cumberland Island is one of Georgia’s most biologically diverse barrier islands, with its maritime forests, coastal beaches, and salt marshes providing a habitat for many endangered kin, in addition to being a resting point along the transatlantic migratory flyway. This wild place has been fervently loved and protected over the past couple of decad…
 
After the 15th century, only five countries in the world had not been colonized by European empires in some form or another. Today we see how the policies, strategies, and technologies intended to “address” climate change will ultimately echo colonial pursuits under the guise of sustainable development and carbon offsets. This week, we explore clim…
 
Called "the queen of canopy research," Nalini Nadkarni explores the rich, vital world found in the tops of trees. Dr. Nadkarni has spent two decades climbing the trees of Costa Rica, Papua New Guinea, the Amazon and the Pacific Northwest, exploring the world of animals and plants that live in the canopy and never come down; and how this upper layer…
 
This week on the podcast we explore what land redistribution could look like and how land can be emancipated from the commodity structure with guest Severine von Tscharner Fleming. How do we navigate the settler desire to own land? How can our understanding of the commons invite us into collective commitment to caring for the land and staving of sp…
 
In this episode @SriMati offers tips, tools and a guided meditation to help us become radiant and positive lights in these tender, challenging times. How can we show up for the people who matter most to us and how can we summon the courage to face our own mortality, understanding that doing so will vastly expand our experience of this lifetime? In …
 
Globally, our forests support almost two-thirds of Earth’s terrestrial species, they are cooperative and resilient systems where connections and relationships are inseparable. However, this interdependence also creates serious vulnerabilities when forests are subjected to land and habitat degradation, industrialized forestry practices, short-sighte…
 
In another inspirational episode @SriMati responds directly to a question from listener Tracey on creativity. How does the doyenne of plant based not-cheese manage multiple creative outlets, a brand new intentional food business and a large, active family? Recorded during Navratri, in reverence to and devotion of the goddess, Julie explores feminin…
 
This past year has forced many of us to transfer our practices into the digital realm, and while this has been done for the safety of our communities, billionaires and tech giants have no desire to see us sever ourselves from the perceived convenience technology provides us. So we must ask ourselves, to what extent does our quality of life become r…
 
What is more beautiful than a being that knows itself? In this uplifting and inspiring episode @SriMati investigates her deeply held belief that you are the one you’ve been waiting for. In this epoch dominated by patriarchal, intellectual societies we are forever trying to reach a consensus on what is right and what is wrong. Yet if we examine crea…
 
Migration has always existed, but in terms of human migration and climate change, we are poised to experience one of the greatest occurrences of global migration humanity has ever known. The number of migrants is now growing faster than our world’s population, and with this growth, we’ve seen the tremendous human rights violations and acts of depra…
 
In this special holiday episode @SriMati and activist @tyler_yarrow_ give thanks for the Tongass region of Southeast Alaska, one of the last untouched forest wildernesses on the planet. In this heart felt connection Tyler and Julie share their personal experience of the awe-inspiring beauty and near-incomprehensible vastness of this sacred region a…
 
In the mid-2000s, estimates in the United States suggested that we were losing up to 40% of honeybee colonies. The phenomenon of Colony Collapse Disorder was widely covered in the media as the next emerging threat, but then it all but disappeared. Beyond these headlines, we never heard much follow up as to how bee populations were faring. This week…
 
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