show episodes
 
Catch up with any event you have missed. The public event podcast series from UCL Political Science brings together the impressive range of policy makers, leading thinkers, practitioners, and academics who speak at our events. Further information about upcoming events can be found via our website: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/political-science/political-science
 
A podcast with School of Public Policy and UCL academics alongside practitioners who will discuss the politics and policy of Covid-19. The format of the podcast will include short presentations from each speaker, with most of the time dedicated to discussion and debate. Listeners will have the option to pre-submit questions to our panel using the links on our website and each podcast will be available to listen to on all major platforms at any time following release.
 
Across the UK, local authorities are declaring a climate emergency, seeking to lead action at a local level to reduce carbon emissions, increase biodiversity, transition to net zero and ultimately improve the quality of life of their residents and the local environment. In this podcast series from UCL and the Local Government Association (LGA), researchers and policy professionals from councils across England share their reflections on working together on the Net Zero Innovation Programme - ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
It is estimated that around a fifth of people working in the UK today are disabled in some way. Many of these people report feeling that their employers do a poor job at accommodating their requirements to make their workplaces more inclusive. Yet the 2010 Equality Act was designed to protect disabled people from ‘discrimination or disadvantage’ in…
 
‘It’s the economy, stupid’. That, famously, was one of the organising principles of Bill Clinton’s campaign for the US presidency in 1992. Thirty years on, amidst a cost of living crisis, economic policy decisions still often dominate politics. Some of the debates about economic policy relate to questions of fundamental values: how much weight shou…
 
It almost goes without saying that public opinion matters in a democracy, where leaders can be scrutinised in the free press and held accountable at free and fair elections. But public attitudes matter in authoritarian contexts too – as illustrated by how careful Russia’s President Vladimir Putin is being at the moment to control the media narrativ…
 
Uniquely, this week we are discussing both a new publication and a new institution. The publication is a book called Out of the Ordinary: How Everyday Life Inspired a Nation and How It Can Again. This book examines the political thought of a group of writers and artists in mid-20th-century Britain, centred around Dylan Thomas, George Orwell, and J.…
 
Displacement of civilian populations is a feature of politics in many parts of the world. War is perhaps the most familiar driver of displacement – we have seen that, of course, on a tragic scale in Ukraine in recent months. But other factors lead people to leave their homes too, including government development policies and the effects of climate …
 
Climate change is perhaps the greatest challenge facing humans today. Yet politics appears to be failing to deliver the required response. Students of politics are therefore conducting a wealth of research to understand what’s happening and what could be done better. But is that research actually doing any good? Is it contributing to better outcome…
 
Most of the UK went to the polls last week, and the vote in Northern Ireland was perhaps particularly significant. Next year will mark 25 years since the 1998 Belfast or Good Friday Agreement, which brought peace to Northern Ireland after nearly 30 years of conflict. The power-sharing arrangements established by the Agreement have brought many succ…
 
No democracy in the world has yet achieved equal representation for women in its national parliament. So it’s important to understand what could be done to improve the situation. One long-standing idea is that some electoral systems may be better than others in enabling fairer representation. A new article co-authored by Dr Eleanor Woodhouse, Lectu…
 
Climate change is – as the article we’re discussing this week puts it – ‘the quintessential long-term problem’. Action is needed to avert massive long-term harm. But the steps that are required will generate short-term costs. Democracies are famously short-termist. Politicians who want to be re-elected don’t like imposing short-term costs on voters…
 
In this podcast, we hear about the importance of community engagement from three participants of the second cohort of the ODI Microsoft peer learning network, an initiative which aims to give data collaborations working on significant societal challenges the opportunity to share and learn from each other. Host James Maddison, Senior Consultant at t…
 
CSVW is a standard for describing and clarifying the content of CSV tables. In this talk you’ll learn how CSVW can make working with CSV easier and connect you to a web of linked-data.The humble CSV format is a popular way of publishing open data, and with good reason. It’s easy to create and edit, non-proprietary and machine-readable. It isn’t par…
 
Some states are secular, while others are based, to a greater or lesser degree, on religion. The difference matters. Secular states are more likely to respect the diverse perspectives of their citizens and protect a range of social and political rights. So what explains variation in institutional secularism? Why did some state secularize centuries …
 
In addition to celebrating her Jubilee, thought is turning to the future of the monarchy, and what changes might be expected after she is gone. Dr Bob Morris (expert on church and state at the Constitution Unit, UCL) will talk about the next Accession and Coronation; Dr Craig Prescott (constitutional lawyer at Bangor University) will explain the ne…
 
We’re looking this week at the political role of courage. The current, dreadful conflict in Ukraine provides numerous extraordinary examples of courage: of civilians who stand up to Russian tanks; of Ukraine’s president, who remains in Kyiv despite manifest personal danger; of anti-war protesters in Russia, who take to the streets though they know …
 
In order to build and retain reputation, organisations today increasingly need to demonstrate that they can be trusted to use data ethically and responsibly. If an organisation is open about how it gathers, shares and uses data – particularly personal and sensitive data – it will have a positive impact on their brand. However, this also requires a …
 
A new book out this month by our colleague Tom O’Grady begins with a remarkable quotation from a UN Special Rapporteur writing in 2018 about welfare reforms in the UK: ‘British compassion’ – the rapporteur said – ‘has been replaced by a punitive, mean-spirited and often callous approach apparently designed to impose a rigid order on the lives of th…
 
How better data ecosystems can help the UK understand national wellbeing.As part of the ODI's Data Ecosystems & Innovation programme, we have been looking at data to measure the recovery in the UK.We often see headlines in the news about how GDP is down, or inflation is up, or CO2 emissions are rising. But how are these numbers created? Where does …
 
Slides are viewable here https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1v-5z6HwGy8bq3j6EV4ZnsUt35HzEPAoZvGLOgWX3pfs/edit?usp=sharingIn this talk, Claire Fram (Director and Product Manager, Diagonal) and Gala Camacho (Director and Data Scientist, Diagonal) discuss the challenges of making use of fragmented (open) data in the built environment. City planner…
 
In this panel discussion, three leading experts—Sarah Isgur (The Dispatch), Megan McArdle (Washington Post), and Matthew Weil (Bipartisan Policy Center)—will examine the causes of distrust in American elections and investigate its broader impact on the resilience of U.S. democracy. About the speakers: Sarah Isgur is a staff writer and host of the l…
 
We talk a lot about trust – or, more often, the lack of trust – in politics. Often we’re referring to people’s trust in politicians. But social trust – our trust in the people around us – matters too. The evidence from must countries is that social trust has been falling in recent decades. But the countries of Scandinavia have bucked that trend. In…
 
The fortieth anniversary of the Malvinas/Falklands War of 1982 is coming up in just a few weeks’ time. There will no doubt be many retrospectives, which, here in the UK, will focus on the actions of the British government, and whether the UK’s response would be different if anything similar took place today. But what about Argentine perspectives on…
 
n this talk about his new book, Corruptible: Who Gets Power and How It Changes Us, UCL associate professor of global politics Brian Klaas draws on over 500 interviews with some of the world’s top leaders – from the noblest to the dirtiest – including presidents, war criminals, cult leaders, terrorists, psychopaths, and dictators to reveal the most …
 
How should we teach about politics? How – if at all – should teaching politics be different from teaching hard sciences, such as physics, or arts and humanities subjects, such as History or English, or indeed other social sciences, such as Economics or Sociology? The territory of politics is inherently contested, so should we embrace that contestat…
 
The Profit Paradox describes how a handful of companies have reaped most of the rewards of technological advancements—acquiring rivals, securing huge profits, and creating brutally unequal outcomes for workers. The consequences are immense, from unnecessarily high prices, to fewer startups that can compete, to rising inequality and stagnating wages…
 
How can you best deliver effective public services? Is it better to exert top-down control over the work of bureaucrats on the ground – through targets, monitoring, and prescribed procedures – so that slacking or corruption or inconsistency can be prevented? Or can more be achieved if you free up bureaucrats to work out their own approaches, utiliz…
 
Tensions have been mounting rapidly since Russia massed 100,000 troops on the Ukrainian border in December. What does Putin hope to achieve? How should the West respond if the Russians do invade? Can the tensions be defused by the US-Russia talks in Geneva? Four distinguished experts join us to answer these questions: General Sir Adrian Bradshaw, f…
 
How can open research help overcome the issues currently affecting the research community?In this talk, Ashley Farley (Program Officer of Knowledge and Research Services and the lead of the Open Access team at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation) discusses the issues currently plaguing the research community – such as perverse incentives, publish o…
 
It’s sometimes said that we’re living through an epidemic of taking offence. We have become hyper-sensitive, the story goes, to any slight against our sense of self-worth. And a generation of so-called ‘snowflakes’ are told they just need to relax a little. But what does it actually mean to take offence? How does feeling offended fit in alongside a…
 
Speakers Dina Ionesco is Manager in the Adaptation Division at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) secretariat, focusing on human mobility and climate change. Lena Dobrowolska and Teo Ormond-Skeaping are an artist collaboration from Poland and the UK whose work focuses on climate change. They won the 2019 Coalition fo…
 
Ethnic voting means voting on the basis of ethnic identity, rather than, say, policy preferences or how well or badly you think the incumbents have governed. Ethnic and other forms of communal voting are found in many parts of the world – think, for example, of very different voting patterns between Protestants and Catholics in Northern Ireland. Bu…
 
In this talk, Adam Mew (Developer Marketing Lead, Ordnance Survey) and Carly Morris (Head of Geovation, Ordnance Survey) share how the OS Map & Hack enabled geospatial data to be used to drive sustainable innovation across multiple industries and disciplines.OS Map & Hack was a virtual hackathon dedicated to transportation and sustainability, bring…
 
The Covid Inquiry is due to start work in the spring, chaired by Baroness (Heather) Hallett, a former Court of Appeal judge. It will be one of the most complex inquiries in legal history, and highly charged politically, with 150k deaths so far, and the pandemic far from over. This seminar brings together three speakers involved with previous high p…
 
Now, no one would claim that the subject of contracts between governments and private sector suppliers is all that sexy. But the last two years of the Covid crisis have certainly revealed its importance. In the earliest weeks of the pandemic back in 2020, governments around the world scrambled to secure enough PPE, hospital ventilators, and Covid t…
 
In this talk, Mateus Domingos will be discussing the Careful Networks project with three of the participating artists: Larisa Blazic, Ailie Rutherford and Shinji Toya.Careful Networks is a project initiated by Phoenix in partnership with BOM, Furtherfield, The Photographers’ Gallery, QUAD and Vivid Projects.The temporary P2P network is home to a se…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login