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The Urban Homestead is a family operated and highly productive city farm. Through sustainable lifestyle choices, the Urban Homestead has become a successful, real-life working model for sustainable agriculture and self-reliant living in a metropolis.
 
The Food Garden Life Show is an award-winning show that celebrates food gardens, food, family, community, and a slightly slower life. Host Emma Biggs is a 15-year-old, Gen-Z gardener with driveway and rooftop gardens. Co-host Steven Biggs is a horticulturist, author, and college instructor. Monthly podcasts from their live radio show include Emma’s Tomato-Talk segment and Steven’s Biggs-on-Figs segment. Weekly podcast episodes include talks with gardeners pushing the boundaries of food garde ...
 
Doctor Prepper's C.P.R. Talk Show is the premier Internet source for information related to Prepping, Individual and Family Preparedness, Self-Reliance, Micro, Urban, Suburban, and Ex-Urban Homesteading, and Survivalist. Whether you're an apartment dweller, urbanite, suburbanite, or ex-urbanite, Doctor Prepper interviews experienced, professional, and expert guests to inform, advise, enrich, and entertain you as you prepare for the uncertain future! Given the state of the Nation's financial ...
 
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Fred Hornaday is bullish about bamboo and it’s many uses. From fuel to food to fibre, he sees it as a versatile crop with environmental benefits. He shares his passion for bamboo through his bambubatu website, which has information about bamboo, how to grow it, how to use it, and its lore. Many Uses of Bamboo Bamboo is an extremely versatile crop t…
 
Wendy Kiang-Spray’s children don’t recognize canned bamboo shoots. That says a lot about the difference between fresh bamboo and its canned cousin. Kiang-Spray, author of The Chinese Kitchen Garden, grew up eating fresh bamboo, one of the many crops her father grows in his large garden. She talks about growing, harvesting, and cooking bamboo. Grow …
 
Today on the podcast we hear how one person’s journey into food gardening evolved into a documentary film — and then we find out how to use garden covers to take vegetable gardening to another level. In My Backyard: A Documentary about Urban Growers Torontonian Jamie Day Fleck converted her entire suburban backyard into a kitchen garden. That was t…
 
Pawpaw. It’s a fruit that has a long history in Ontario. Yet it’s not well-known, nor do most people realize it grows wild in some parts of the province. Paul DeCampo, Toronto’s pawpaw ambassador, planted his first pawpaw trees in 1994. “Nobody I knew had ever heard of this fruit,” he says. Working in the food industry, he has had the opportunity t…
 
Where have all the newspaper boxes gone? If you’re in western Pennsylvania, don’t be surprised if you find a dark green newspaper box with a sign in the window that says “Doug’s Free Seed Shack.“ Pittsburgh garden expert Doug Oster, a newspaper industry veteran, is using old newspaper boxes to get seeds to as many people as possible. He wants more …
 
Old becomes new. When David Goodyear began to think about food costs, sustainability, and how he and his family ate, he sat down with older relatives to hear how people used to eat. “Everybody ate root crops because they grew it themselves,” he was told. Goodyear says there are many root crops that grow well in Newfoundland. It didn’t seem right wh…
 
Coconut. Almond. Green fig. These are some of the flavours people use to describe what they taste when Chef David Salt serves something flavoured with fig leaves. Salt cooked with fig leaves in London, England, where he had a ready source of fig leaves in a nearby churchyard. Upon relocating to Toronto, he didn’t know where to find them. And that’s…
 
Mushroom identification can be daunting for beginners, with Latin names and spore prints used to differentiate hard-to-identify mushrooms. In his new book, How to Forage for Mushrooms without Dying: An Absolute Beginners Guide to Identifying 29 Wild Edible Mushrooms, Frank Hyman focuses on edible mushrooms that are easy to identify. Easy-to-Identif…
 
In the episode Anais interviews Occidental College interns Irene and Julia. They talk about their summer farm internship experience, building a 50 ft hugel and more! Have a question? Send us an email at info@urbanhomestead.org About Urban Homestead Sprouting on a 1/10th acre plot in 1985, this homestead project pioneered the modern urban homesteadi…
 
Joseph Lofthouse had hundreds of jars of seed around his house when he began market gardening. He saved seeds from each variety…a time-consuming task. Today he has far fewer jars of seed. Today he practices landrace gardening. Lofthouse no longer focuses on keeping pure varieties, but instead uses genetically diverse lots of seed. His is the author…
 
re-uploaded this episode since there was audio issues... please, re-listen! In this episode Anais chats with new farm intern, Tristan Lahoz. Tristan shares how he went from the fashion industry to growing his own food and helping out at the homestead. About the Urban Homesteaders: With over 30 years of homestead and farming knowledge, second genera…
 
Julie Brunson didn’t garden as a child, but began to garden and grow food as an adult. When her husband was in a dark place and found solace in their garden, the garden not only fed them, it helped him to heal. That was the start of a journey into teaching kids about regenerative gardening, and also using the garden as a way to touch on a host of o…
 
What is the ideal plant for a small yard? The ideal plant for someone wanting something ornamental – yet edible too? And, just to complicate things, it has to be good for a garden where there are lots of squirrels. Claus Nader found that hot peppers were that ideal plant. Nader was gardening in a small yard that was frequented by marauding squirrel…
 
Chris Smith remembers his first okra encounter well. It was at a diner in Georgia. A native of the UK, where growing conditions are not conducive to heat-loving okra, the vegetable was foreign to him. So was the cuisine of the American south. His recollection of that first taste of okra? Slime and grease. While not enamoured by his first okra exper…
 
Jennifer Lauruol weaves together permaculture concepts, native plants, food plants, forest gardening, and educational elements in her regenerative-garden design work in Lancaster, England. Her passion is edible ornamental gardening—especially in front yards. Lauruol also uses many native plants in her designs. She finds that effective design helps …
 
Anais the host of the Urban Homestead Podcast gets interviewed by farm intern Sanjay. In this topsy-turvy, light hearted episode you'll learn a few personal and fun tidbits about this second generation homesteader. About the Urban Homesteaders: With over 30 years of homestead and farming knowledge, second generation homesteaders Anais, Justin and J…
 
Meet Neal Peterson, the Indiana Jones of pawpaws. He was so moved by the taste of pawpaw that it became his life’s work. There were improved pawpaw varieties in the early 20th century—but the fruit fell into obscurity. Peterson dug through the literature to uncover past pawpaw breeding work, and then set out to track down lost varieties for use in …
 
Today on the podcast we head to Reno, Nevada to hear about Urban Roots, an organization that uses garden education to help change the way people eat. It takes gardens to classrooms…and uses the garden as a classroom at its urban teaching farm. Fayth Ross and Elsa DeJong talk about the summer farm camp, programming for home-schooling families, and c…
 
In this rebroadcast of the radio show that aired live on July 7th, we talk about soil and no-till practices with market gardener, farm journalist, and podcaster Jesse Frost. He’s the host of The No-Till Market Garden Podcast, and he and his wife are no-till farmers at their Rough Draft Farmstead in Kentucky. Frost’s new book is The Living Soil Hand…
 
Where is the sweet spot that gardening meets the natural world…so that gardening is ecological? Our guest today explains that ecological gardening is all about balance. Matt Rees-Warren says, “Your garden is a pocket of wild; it will never be purely wild, because it’s an interaction between ourselves and nature. But it can be much more regenerative…
 
Our guest today, Chef Alan Bergo, looks at vegetables through the eyes of a forager. He’s passionate about using parts of the plant that are often overlooked. Chefs using a whole animals might use the term nose-to-tail cooking. Bergo takes this approach with his vegetables, using a root-to-flower approach. Bergo is the author of the new book, The F…
 
“I can’t hold them back sometimes,” says physiotherapist Nancy Durrant as she tells us about the garden at the long-term care home where she works. The residents she’s talking about are mainly in their 90s. And the vegetables and herbs they grow and harvest become part of the menu at this Toronto long-term care home. An avid gardener herself, Duran…
 
Today on the podcast we visit the Black Creek Community Farm in Toronto. The farm is located along the northern boundary of the City of Toronto, in a densely populated neighbourhood where Toronto meets one of its northern suburbs, within walking distance of the Jane and Finch neighbourhood. If you’re from Toronto, you’ll know Jane and Finch — at le…
 
In a broadcast that originally aired live on The Food Garden Life Radio Show, we head to California to talk with Christy Wilhelmi, a self-described garden nerd with a passion for growing fruit and vegetables, and an expert at small-space edible-garden design. In the podcast she shares tips about: Incorporating fruit plants in small-space gardens Gr…
 
Today on the podcast we head to Montreal to hear about City Farm School, an urban-agriculture apprenticeship program. Jackie Martin, a co-ordinator with City Farm School, explains that this not-for-profit program uses space provided by Concordia University. In addition to greenhouse space on the 13th floor of a downtown building, the “farm” is loca…
 
Today on the podcast we talk about “foodscaping,” gardening that combines the ornamental with the edible, also known as edible landscaping. Foodscaper Jeremy Cooper says he likes to work with plants that have multiple functions, including ornamental, herbal, medicinal, ecological, and edible. Cooper worked in a number of jobs before focusing on foo…
 
Today on the podcast we explore the idea of healing through growing. We travel to Israel, to meet Nachum Lamour-Fridman. He uses plants and growing as part of the programming at the Borgani community centre he founded for PTSD sufferers and their families. Lamour-Fridman’s dream is to create a model of a sustainability centre that can be used to he…
 
In a broadcast that originally aired live on The Food Garden Life Radio Show, we head to North Carolina to chat with beekeeper Justin Maness. Backyard Honeybees Maness began working with honey bees after finishing college, when he joined a research team studying the links of neonicotinoid pesticides and honey bee mortality. After that, he worked in…
 
In this episode Anais interviews, farm intern and soil steward, Sanjay Gupta. Sanjay shares tips on passive composting, drip irrigation installation and regenerative practices for optimizing healthy soil. About the Urban Homesteaders: With over 30 years of homestead and farming knowledge, second generation homesteaders Anais, Justin and Jordanne De…
 
Today on the podcast we meet an avid gardener who grew up in downtown Toronto, in a family that didn’t garden. And for a long time she didn’t garden either. But then one person sparked her interest in gardening, and dropped by with a bucket of llama poo to help her make and plant her very first garden. Julia Dimakos hasn’t looked back. Her kitchen …
 
Today on the podcast we hang out here in Toronto to speak with Isaac Crosby. Isaac is the Urban Agriculture Lead at Toronto’s Evergreen Brickworks. During our chat, Isaac told us that, “Part of wisdom is not keeping it to yourself.” He shares with us wisdom that has come to him through Ojibwa teachings. Isaac is from the Ojibwa of Anderdon, a small…
 
Today on the podcast we head to Ohio to find out more about potager gardens. Jennifer Bartley tells us about this traditional kitchen garden style from France, and how to create the same sort of food-producing garden with seasonality and a sense of intimacy at home. Bartley writes, “The potager is more than a kitchen garden; it is a philosophy of l…
 
In a broadcast that originally aired live on The Food Garden Life Radio Show, we chat with herbalist Bevin Cohen about using, growing, and foraging herbs. He talks about culinary, medicinal, and cosmetic uses. He also talks about his journey into the business of herbs and building his herb business. Cohen is also an author and seed saver. His new b…
 
Happy Spring! The French have a saying "Fleuris là où tu es plantée" which translates to "bloom where you are planted" and there's lots of blooms bursting forth here on the homestead. In this episode, not only will reflect on spring blooms, we'll catch up on 'homestead happenings' and 'what's growing on in the garden?' About the Urban Homesteaders:…
 
Today on the podcast we head to Quebec City to talk about civil disobedience: Civil disobedience with vegetables. Marie-Hélène Jacques from the not-for-profit organization Les Urbainculteurs – which translates into urban growers – joins us to talk about moving the needle on growing food in Quebec City. The urban agriculture scene in Quebec City is …
 
Today on the podcast we head to Montreal to hang out with Shawn Manning from Urban Seedling. He tells us how, 10 years ago, he channelled his love of growing vegetables into a business specialized in creating vegetable gardens. Along with helping people create and grow vegetable gardens, another goal was to improve food security in the city. He rea…
 
We chat with forager and a wild-food educator Mike Krebill in Iowa. Krebill shares foraging tips, his insights into teaching, his approach to outdoor education—and stories from the years he spent teaching a grade seven elective course on foraging. Krebill’s new book is A Forager’s Life: Reflections on Mother Nature and my 70+ Years of Digging, Pick…
 
We chat with forest garden designer and edible landscaper Mark Lord in south-western Germany. “A garden should be a holistic experience, feeding all of your senses, and your mind,” says Lord. He believes food gardens can be about more than just eating—that they can also be visually appealing, bio-diverse, and appeal to other senses such as smell. W…
 
We chat with author, horticulturist, and plant breeder Joseph Tychonievich. Tychonievich shares his top tips for new vegetable gardeners. As an avid food gardener, he grows many different food crops. But every so often he focuses on a particular crop and grows as many varieties as he can. He recently emerged from a cucumber phase…and as a teenager,…
 
We chat with Arlene Hazzan Green and Marc Green, co-owners of The Backyard Urban Farm Company (BUFCO) in Toronto about their mission to help people grow food at home. They are edible landscapers who help people plan, plant, and maintain food gardens. They have even ventured into wheelchair-accessible beds. From Film to Farming Hazzan Green explains…
 
Anais and Justin share what's growing on at their little homestead in the city. Farmer Justin discusses the upcoming spring planting and how unseasonably dry the weather's been this winter. Anais has been busy with growing the online presence with the launch of their non-profit website www.urbanhomesteadinstitute.org and new CSA farm box site at ww…
 
We head to San Diego, California to chat with Mim Michelove and Nan Sterman, who share a love of growing food and involvement in food activism. As unemployment in their community grew during the COVID-19 pandemic, and as the local food supply became shaky, they decided to use their connections with commercial growers, in the community, and with soc…
 
We head to Montana to chat with Tim Southwell of ABC Acres, the permaculture homestead he and his his wife Sarah created. Southwell, who grew up in suburban Houston, explains that it was while living in Kansas City and growing a front-yard vegetable garden that he was introduced to permaculture and many of the concepts that he uses today on the far…
 
We chat with Vermont garden educator and radio host Charlie Nardozzi, who discusses his journey into no-dig gardening—and why it’s good for gardeners, the soil, and the environment. He also tells us about his new book, The Complete Guide to No-Dig Gardening. Nardozzi hasn’t always been a no-dig gardener. He used to garden with a gas-guzzling tiller…
 
What inspires youth and children to garden? In today's show we speak with a 15-year-old on a mission to inspire other teens to garden, and find out about an organization helping people garden with children. We speak with 15-year-old gardener Vivien Wong in New York State, who fills her small suburban yard with fruit and vegetables. She has been doc…
 
With a reputation for unusual and wildly popular tomato varieties, tomato breeder Brad Gates focuses above all else on flavour. He didn’t start out working in tomato breeding. While working in the landscape industry, he was asked by a friend to help sell heirloom tomatoes at a farmers market. Gates loved the energy at the market—and he was fascinat…
 
What’s old is new: Cold cellars are back. Transition Guelph launches an initiative to build local food-storage capacity through cold cellar education and installations. We find out what they’re doing—and get tips to help you make a home cold cellars. We are joined by Steve Tedesco and Ian Findlay from Transition Guelph. Tedesco is a Guelph-area far…
 
Happy New Year! After a short winter "break" we are back! Thank you all for tuning in, it's our wish that these podcasts offer you hope and inspiration during these challenging times. In this episode Anais, Justin and Jordanne reflect on happenings from 2020. They also share what they look forward to accomplishing in '21. “I wish it need not have h…
 
We chat with vegetable gardening expert Niki Jabbour about using garden bed covers. She is the author of the new book, Growing Under Cover: Techniques for a More Productive, Weather-Resistant, Pest-Free Vegetable Garden. Jabbour is a Halifax-based, award-winning author, host of The Weekend Gardener radio show, and one of the experts behind the gard…
 
It’s an astringent. And it might already be growing in your yard or nearby. Today we take you beyond eating raspberry fruit to explore the herbal and medicinal properties of the plant itself—along with its relatives in the genus Rubus. Ever heard of raspberry-leaf tea? Tune in, and find out about the many uses of this plant. Raspberry Family The 20…
 
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