show episodes
 
The novel centres, in a very ambiguous way, around the life story of the protagonist Jacob Flanders, and is presented entirely by the impressions other characters have of Jacob [except for those times when we do indeed get Jacob's perspective]. Thus, although it could be said that the book is primarily a character study and has little in the way of plot or background, the narrative is constructed as a void in place of the central character, if indeed the novel can be said to have a 'protagon ...
 
Overdue is a podcast about the books you've been meaning to read. Join Andrew and Craig each week as they tackle a new title from their backlog. Classic literature, obscure plays, goofy childen’s books: they'll read it all, one overdue book at a time.
 
Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English author, essayist, publisher, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a member of the Bloomsbury Group. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs. Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), and Orlando (1928), and the book-length essay A Room of One's Own (1929), with its famous dictum, "A w ...
 
Something True brings you incredible and bizarre true stories from the footnotes of history. A dog in the United States Cabinet? A leading rocket scientist who quit his job to make a moonchild? Virginia Woolf donning blackface to prank a navy? They're all true. They're all Something True.
 
Virginia Woolf is one of the most influential and controversial feminine figures in the literary life of the London society. Night and Day is one of her first novels published in 1919 which displays the moral and spiritual issues that people confront. The author herself was an emotionally unstable person, her episodes of mental illness and suicidal depression being recurrent and always brought into the public attention. The novel revolves around the life of the main character, Katherine Hilb ...
 
The Farmer's Bride is a collection of 28 poems by British modernist writer Charlotte Mew. The original edition was published in 1916; this edition, published in 1921, contains 11 more poems. Mew's poetry is varied in style and content, but manifests a concern with gender issues throughout. Mew's life was marked by loneliness and depression, and she eventually committed suicide. Her work earned her the admiration of her peers, including Virginia Woolf, who characterized her as "very good and ...
 
Masterpiece Theatre meets Mystery Science Theater 3000 in a podcast of highbrow readings and lowbrow commentary. Comedians Kelly Nugent and Lindsay Katai come together to read aloud classic and not-so-classic literature from the public domain and provide real-time commentary with the help of special guests. Subscribe now to experience the best and worst from the likes of Edgar Allen Poe, Virginia Woolf, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sherwood Anderson, Jack London, and many more... no one escapes ...
 
Fabled Collective is a bi-weekly podcast that explores mysteries, legends, myths, lore, ghosts, and fairy tales. Investigation of these tales of woe often reveal grim details that have been long hidden in the dark corners of history. Every story is a mix of both fact and fiction, and so are our episodes. We'll tell you a story, and then we'll tell you the truth. And to be perfectly honest, sometimes even our best fiction isn't as riveting as the facts.
 
Local Story Space is an online space for stories about creative women and their creative spaces. Based on Virginia Woolf’s idea that “a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write,” each interview is an opportunity to explore what space means, what feeds creativity and the ways that creative women make time and space for their creativity when there are often competing demands. www.localstoryspace.com
 
Aphra Behn was the first woman writer in England to make a living by her pen, and her novel Oroonoko was the first work published in English to express sympathy for African slaves. Perhaps based partly on Behn's own experiences living in Surinam, the novel tells the tragic story of a noble slave, Oroonoko, and his love Imoinda. The work was an instant success and was adapted for the stage in 1695 (and more recently by the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1999). Behn's work paved the way for wome ...
 
Victoria Mary Sackville-West, The Hon Lady Nicolson, best known as Vita Sackville-West, was an English author and poet. Her long narrative poem, The Land, won the Hawthornden Prize in 1927. She won it again, becoming the only writer to do so, in 1933 with her Collected Poems. She helped create her own gardens in Sissinghurst, Kent, which provide the backdrop to Sissinghurst Castle. She was famous for her exuberant aristocratic life, her strong marriage, and her passionate affair with novelis ...
 
"Pointed Roofs" is the first volume of "Pilgrimage," a series of thirteen autobiographical novels by Dorothy Richardson considered to have pioneered the "stream of consciousness" technique of writing. In a review of Pointed Roofs (The Egoist April 1918), May Sinclair first applied the term "stream of consciousness" in her discussion of Richardson's stylistic innovations. Richardson, however, preferred the term "interior monologue." Miriam Henderson, the central character in Pilgrimage, is ba ...
 
Novel Conversations is a podcast summarizing the world’s greatest works of classic literature: in 35 minutes you get the whole story from cover to cover. If CliffsNotes had an audio-bestfriend, it would be us! Each episode, Frank Lavallo hosts two readers, and the three of them share their reactions to the story and read their favorite passages along the way. If you're looking for a good story, you're in the right place. *This podcast is a production of the Ohio Film Tax Credit.
 
The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
Welcome to the Charleston to Charleston Literary Festival Podcast. Each episode presents a live, unscripted session that took place on Festival stages in 2018 and 2019. The lineup includes legendary editor Tina Brown, Pulitzer Prize winner David Blight, biographer Jung Chang, Shakespearean scholar Stephen Greenblatt, bestselling authors Bernard Cornwell, Madeline Miller, Margo Jefferson and Jeanette Winterson plus the matchless Joyce Carol Oates, and many more. You’ll hear about topics as di ...
 
A podcast about stories & art of making stories, an initiative by Storytel. We will share first episodes of our original series. We will also share some free short stories, author interviews and updates Follow us into the world of stories. Storytel is an audiobook streaming app to enjoy listening to your favourite stories! A perfect app when you need a break from work, sitting on the commute, or lying awake without entertainment. Breathtaking thrillers, tickling romance and welcoming feelgoo ...
 
Download a full audiobook of your choice free at http://hotaudiobook.com/free Just start a 30-day Free Trial and pick any one audiobook free from 100,000+ best sellers, new releases sci-fi, romances, mysteries, classics, and more. Sign up, select your favorite audiobook, free, with a 30-day trial, stream or download your audiobook instantly on your smartphone, tablet, laptop or desktop. It's that easy!
 
Loading …
show series
 
Even though 2020 has been plenty terrifying, we’re getting into the Halloween spirit! We’re joined by Lauren to discuss women in horror with the badass adventurers of The Descent and the teenage succubus of Jennifer’s Body! Did we overlook Megan Fox? Does adding a male character make matters better or worse? We tackle these questions, plus reminisc…
 
The Opera's alive with the sound of music! It's time to dive into the serialized story-slash-novel that spawned one of the most successful musicals of all time. (The one by Andrew Lloyd Webber, maybe you've heard of it?) It's pretty different, it seems? For more on voting in the 2020 election here in the United States, head to votesaveamerica.com. …
 
This week we choose to travel to Mother Russia to make jingoistic jokes and hang out with Rasputin, every 90s kid's favorite historical figure! Not sure what's going on with the voices in this one. For more on voting in the 2020 election here in the United States, head to votesaveamerica.com. Our theme music was composed by Nick Lerangis.…
 
On Episode 45 of Monthly Movie Dispatch we discuss 4 new 2020 features and then 1 Film Club choice from any decade. - Border- Mulan- You Cannot Kill David Arquette- Boys State- I'm Thinking of Ending Things Nick = https://letterboxd.com/moffman23Brandon = https://letterboxd.com/bebDerek = https://letterboxd.com/chickentacShaun = https://letterboxd.…
 
We covered the original queer classic, The Boys in the Band, back in June in celebration of pride. This month, Netflix released a remake starring the cast of the Tony winning revival and produced by Ryan Murphy. So this week, in celebration of its release, Max and Rob dropped in to watch the remake. Starring Zachary Quinto and Jim Parsons, the dram…
 
Welcome to Spooktober 2020! What's scarier than a story about a teenage girl who falls in with a family of vampires? 160 more pages than the original story and it's all from the sad vampire boy's perspective! Meyer's companion novel to the original Twilight reminds us what we did and didn't like about the series, as well as fleshes out a bit of the…
 
This week we answer the question on everyone's minds: why, the last man? This mid-2000s graphic novel imagines a world without men, a specific kind of apocalypse with a different flavor from The Leftovers or other "what if X suddenly disappeared from Earth forever" fiction. Our theme music was composed by Nick Lerangis.…
 
Quentin Tarantino and Paul Thomas Anderson are two of their generation's most celebrated filmmakers. But, everyone starts somewhere and The Queer Film Podcast is taking a look back at two auteur's debut films. Academy Awards and Palme d'Ors were in both men's future, but they announced themselves to the world in the 1990's with two movies about cri…
 
The story that launched H.G. Wells’s successful career and earned him his reputation as the “Father of Science Fiction.” The Time Machine sends a brave explorer to face a future burdened with our greatest hopes… and our darkest fears. The discovery of two bizarre races, the Eloi and the Morlocks, offer a dystopian warning and / or a portrait of hop…
 
Regina Marler, Sarah Milroy with Virginia Nicholson | Vanessa Bell was a pivotal figure in the 20th Century British art world. In this session, Regina Marler - editor of The Selected Letters of Vanessa Bell - and Sarah Milroy - curator of a recent Vanessa Bell exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery in London, discussed the painter with her granddaug…
 
Michael Chabon's 2007 alternate history novel is a murder mystery featuring a hard-boiled detective, though neither the detective nor the murder mystery are the most memorable parts of it. The alternate history part, along with Chabon's prose, are enough to make up for whatever other shortcomings the novel might have. Our theme music was composed b…
 
Lionel Shriver, Philip K. Howard with Geoffrey Harpham | In her latest novel, Lionel Shriver introduced us to a dark, dystopian future most of us would rather not encounter in real life. Philip K. Howard, however, has a more hopeful view of the future and its ultimate potential. Were either of them able to convince the attendees their way is the ri…
 
On Episode 44 of Monthly Movie Dispatch we discuss 4 new 2020 features and then 1 Film Club choice from any decade. - The Trouble With Harry - Relic - Never Rarely Sometimes Always - First Cow - Weathering With You Nick = https://letterboxd.com/moffman23 Brandon = https://letterboxd.com/beb Derek = https://letterboxd.com/chickentac Shaun = https://…
 
We just couldn't resist another trip to Panem! This origin story for the trilogy's primary villain, Coriolanus Snow, takes us all the way back to the 10th Annual Hunger Games. Things are a little less flashy, but no less deadly. Struggle along with us through the hunger, through the games, and through the limits of fiction told through the antagoni…
 
Rebecca Makkai with Bill Goldstein | Rebecca Makkai took Bill Goldstein and their audience on a journey back to 1980s Chicago, when the AIDS epidemic was reaching its height and an entire generation of gay men was dying. But while the topic was heady, Rebecca Makkai’s spunk and sass kept things from getting too dark, and there were even laughs to b…
 
Last episode, we discussed the life of Virginia Woolf, a feminist writer of the 20th century. In this episode, we’ll delve into A Room of One’s Own, a powerful lecture she delivered to group of young women from the Cambridge colleges of Newnham and Girton in 1928, compiled and published in 1929. In this summary and analysis of Virginia Woolf’s A Ro…
 
This week we're finally covering two of queer cinema's most famous road trips; To Wong Foo and Priscilla Queen of the Desert! (We know these aren't the full titles of these films, but brevity is everything when you have a character count.) One film beautifully showcases the Australian outback, features Oscar winning costume designs and three charac…
 
Bart van Es and Belinda Gergel | In what would prove to be perhaps the most poignant moment of the 2019 Charleston to Charleston Literary Festival, Bart van Es read aloud the letter written by a mother to her daughter, moments before the mother was deported to a Nazi concentration camp. As he recounted the journey he took to find out the history of…
 
Joyce Carol Oates with Geoffrey Harpham | Joyce Carol Oates took the stage before a sold-out crowd at the historic Dock Street Theatre, and a hush fell over the audience. Of course it did. That is the only response to seeing one of the world’s most prolific and lauded authors in a rare talk about books, writing, and, of course, boxing. We never kne…
 
We’re back! After a month off, we’re joined by activist Len DeWilde, who brings with him the transgender German rom-com you didn’t know existed, Romeos, and we pair it with Pedro Almodóvar’s The Skin I Live In. One is a harmless coming out story, the other is about an evil scientist and a sadistic quest for revenge. We play Almodovar drinking games…
 
David W. Blight with Judge Richard Gergel | “The only power, the only real weapon, Douglass ever had were his words.” So says David W. Blight, historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Prophet of Freedom, a deep dive into the life of Frederick Douglass, one of America’s greatest orators and civil rights champions. In this revealing discussion,…
 
On Episode 43 of Monthly Movie Dispatch we discuss 1 new feature and then the 4 film choices that we made each other watch during June 2020: - Palm Springs - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Thief - The Swimmer - Yojimbo Nick = https://letterboxd.com/moffman23 Brandon = https://letterboxd.com/beb Derek = https://letterboxd.com/chickentac Shaun = h…
 
Lauren Oliver's first novel is about a teenage girl forced to relive the last day of her life over and over again. What can she change? What should she change? And how will she change? Find out the answers to those questions and more (namely, how all time loop fiction is beholden to the 1993 film Groundhog Day) in this week's episode. Our theme mus…
 
Carl Zimmer with Melissa Hughes | Modern-day genetics study has come a long way from the simple Punnett Squares we all learned in middle school. Today we know there are layers of complicating factors that determine who we are, what we look like, and how we interact with the world. In this conversation with NY Times science writer Carl Zimmer, audie…
 
Karen Kukil with Regina Marler | Karen Kukil is an archivist at Smith College and has spent her career immersed in the private papers of Sylvia Plath and Virginia Woolf. In this conversation with Bloomsbury expert Regina Marler, Karen Kukil treated audience members to remarkable insights into the lives of two of the early 20th Centuries most fascin…
 
Everything happens for a reason in James McBride's new novel. It's September of 1969 and a doddering Brooklyn deacon just shot the neighborhood's top drug dealer. The events set in motion touch every member of the community - from its 102-year-old founder to the fire ants in the boiler room - and help them build a future as the world changes around…
 
In May 2020 a deadly tropical cyclone struck Eastern India and Bangladesh. Named ‘Amphan’ and classified as a ‘Super Cyclone’ this was almost certainly a climate change induced extreme event. This event was organised by the Climate Crisis Thinking in the Humanities and Social Sciences Network https://torch.ox.ac.uk/climate-crisis-thinking-in-the-hu…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2020 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login