show episodes
 
Reflecting History is an educational history podcast that explores significant historical events and themes without losing track of the ordinary people involved. Covering a wide variety of topics, it is a narrative driven podcast that delves into the connection between history, psychology, and philosophy on a personal level.
 
The Maritime History Podcast is a chronological look at maritime history and its numerous facets. Beginning with ancient history, the podcast looks at trade, exploration, boat and ship-building, economics, and the relationship between the ocean and the development of society and culture throughout history. Learn more about the podcast at http://maritimehistorypodcast.com.
 
Ever wish you lived in a bygone era? Then get ready to have your dreams of nostalgia crushed! Join three sassy ladies as they highlight the awful parts of world history that we’ve forgotten - or tried to forget. You may be feeling down about the present, but from plagues and pox to wars and witch trials, we can assure you that everything always sucked. 'Everything Always Sucked' is a history-comedy podcast and is NSFW.
 
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show series
 
Ken Liu's amazing short story "The Paper Menagerie" is simple but poignant. It provides an opportunity to think about some of the most important things in life: love, culture, history, regret, memories, identity, and more. But maybe above all it is the story of the bond between a mother and her son. Thanks for the support! Read the story here: http…
 
Today we bring our time with the Athenian leader Themistocles to a close. The character qualities we've seen throughout his career continue to pop up even in the later stages of his life. And although the Greek world continued on in his absence, today we'll try to follow him to his death in exile and see how his supporters and his detractors begin …
 
What was life like under the Khmer Rouge? Ordinary life for millions of Cambodians was filled with fear, torment, and despair. Yet the people of Cambodia also demonstrated resilience, resistance, and an enduring human spirit to protect their families and those they cared about. This is Part II in a series on the Cambodian Genocide. It goes over ord…
 
A potent mix of communism, nationalism, racialism, imperialism, and violence resulted in the Khmer Rouge coming to power in Cambodia in 1975. Led by a man going by the name of Pol Pot, the Khmer Rouge orchestrated the deaths of 1.5 to 2 million Cambodians in a genocide that has become known to history simply as the killing fields. In only four year…
 
"Grief burns but does not consume." A grieving merchant stumbles into the shop of an Alchemist, who shows him a device that allows the user to travel 20 years forward or backward in time. The history of the device and the subsequent choice to step through by the grieving merchant say much about the philosophical nature of determinism and free will,…
 
Barbarian incursions are often cited as a primary instigator to the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west in 476 AD. But why were they happening at this time in the first place? Why not some other time? Like many parts of the story of Rome, climate change may hold some of the answers. Meanwhile, the empire was able to survive in the east, with J…
 
Shortly after the end of World War II, journalist Milton Mayer visited an ordinary town in West Germany to live with and interview former civilians of Nazi Germany. His goal was to answer some deep questions: to what extent are ordinary people complicit in the creation of authoritarian evil? In what ways did ordinary Germans accept moral responsibi…
 
Much has been made of the great Roman crisis of the 200's AD. Civil war, political strife, economic dysfunction, and the collapse of the frontier system were just a few of the major problems that threatened to collapse the empire. In the midst of the crisis, as the climate was changing and becoming less favorable, the Plague of Cyprian hit the empi…
 
In this episode, I chat with Daniel Hoyer from Seshat about looking at history through a statistical lens. We discuss the Seshat Databank and his new book, Figuring Out the Past: The 3,495 Vital Statistics that Explain World History. Let's Stay in Touch! You can join the conversation in our Facebook Group, the History Fangirl Podcast Community, or …
 
The Roman Empire during the Pax Romana was in many ways a golden age of ancient commerce, urbanization, and connectivity. But the same things that made the empire great also made the empire vulnerable to a new type of danger: the pandemic. The Antonine Plague ravaged through the empire from roughly 165 to 180, in waves of chaos and misery. The resi…
 
In this episode, I chat with Eric Halsey from the Bulgarian History Podcast about the hidden gem of Veliko Tarnovo. This once-important Bulgarian city is one of the most picturesque in Europe, and yet not many outside of Bulgaria know much about it. You can find Eric's podcast here. Let's Stay in Touch! You can join the conversation in our Facebook…
 
The fall of the Roman Empire is one of the great stories in all of history. Wars, political turmoil, barbarian invasions, moral decay, and economic decline are often some of the reasons given as the chief causes of the fall of the western empire in 476 AD. However, historian Kyle Harper would argue that climate and disease play a pivotal role in th…
 
Happy Thanksgiving everybody, here's a bonus episode I put out on the Patreon bonus feed a few months ago. Hopefully you find it useful. Bullshit is one of those concepts that is difficult to define, but that didn't stop philosopher Harry Frankfurt from attempting to get a better grasp of it. Most of us are familiar with the ways that bullshit has …
 
When we think of the historical process, we often think of archives, books, libraries, primary sources, and journals. And we should. But sometimes there is a useful element to informal history-the interactions, relationships, memories, and stories that academics often don't bother to study. They aren't scientific, but they add color. They can fill …
 
Happy Halloween, friends! Buckle up because on this episode we explore aspects of the Satanic Panic, including the origins of Satan, recovered memories, and law enforcement. Featuring special guest, Barrett Wilbert Weed. Instagram | @everythingalwayssucked Twitter | @EASpodcast Facebook | @everythingalwayssucked…
 
When deadly and traumatic historical events transpire, there is usually plenty of attention paid to these important events. But less often studied is the scars and ripples of sadness that emanate in the lives of ordinary people after events like this. The Cultural Revolution provides a poignant example of the scars and memories that ordinary people…
 
History is the study of the past. Oftentimes we tend to forget that history still existed and is worth studying during times that wouldn't be considered earth-shattering or momentous. Could the study of "ordinary history" teach us something important about the way we look at the past? Could it teach us something about ourselves specifically or huma…
 
In this episode, I had a chance to sit down with Lan Cao and Harlan Van Cao. We discussed a number of topics, including: Lan's experience and life as a refugee of the Vietnam War and how that experience reverberates in Harlan's life, immigration and assimilation, discrimination, identity and the importance of finding equilibrium and balance in life…
 
Slavery is a difficult topic to learn and teach about. Combine this with some of the big picture problems inherent in most education systems and there is bound to be misconceptions and confusion abound. This episode tackles just a few of these myths and misconceptions through the work of a few notable historians. Support the podcast: https://www.pa…
 
A team of scientists returns home from a journey to investigate the causes of a massive supernova. What they discover in the remnants of the cloudy nebula will change humanity forever. The chief astrophysicist of the mission must wrestle with questions of science, faith, and senseless evil. Arthur C. Clarke's award winning science fiction short sto…
 
Not-so-secretly a little old lady at heart, Hadley Meares loves herself a rocking chair. But when exactly did this uniquely American invention become a feature of front porches coast to coast? Well, perhaps seat yourself in a rocking chair for this episode. Subscribe to Happy History on iTunes, on Spotify, on Google Podcasts or on Stitcher. Listen …
 
What do we mean when we say that a civilization collapsed? This is an extremely common way to speak about ancient societies and governmental systems. It typically carries a negative connotation, but did these "collapses" actually represent decreases in the well being of the human beings who fell victim to them? A similar series of ponderings can ap…
 
Please enjoy the story of Faith, a British cat who was awarded a medal for courage during World War II. Subscribe to Happy History on iTunes, on Spotify, on Google Podcasts or on Stitcher. Listen to Hadley’s other podcast, Underbelly L.A. It’s not quite as sunny, but it’s a fun dive into history nonetheless. Every episode of Happy History is resear…
 
Humans have not, actually, been forever blowing bubbles, but the history of mankind putting a little soapy wonder into the air goes back further than you might guess. Subscribe to Happy History on iTunes, on Spotify, on Google Podcasts or on Stitcher. Listen to Hadley’s other podcast, Underbelly L.A. It’s not quite as sunny, but it’s a fun dive int…
 
Hey, remember parties? It might seem like ancient history when we could have carefree gatherings, but in this episode, we’re looking specifically at the parties held during a period of ancient history. Antony and Cleopatra might be famous for being lovers and political figures, but in their day they were also famous for throwing parties so over-the…
 
Hot on the heels of our previous episode about First Lady friendships, this episode focuses on female pilots: specifically the first two aviatrixes ever, Harriet Quimby and Mathilde Moisant. They were pioneers in the sky, and it’s all the better because they encouraged each other to greater and greater heights. Follow Hadley on Twitter. Subscribe t…
 
Personal identity and the self are major concepts of historical and philosophical study. But applying these concepts to others IS history. It's a major purpose of what we do. This episode discusses the famous thought experiment "the Ship of Theseus," and Greg Egan's excellent short story "Learning to Be Me." The lessons learned from these sources c…
 
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