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Gardening and horticulture news and tips, as well as agricultural information from Amanda McNulty, the host of SCETV's "Making It Grow" and Clemson University Extension Agent. Produced by South Carolina Public Radio.Making It Grow Minutes are produced by South Carolina Public Radio, in partnership with Clemson University's Extension Service.
 
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Much of the Beidler Forest is a swamp – a flooded forest where the water level fluctuates rather dramatically, some areas may occasionally be completely dry. The water doesn’t come from streams or springs but from rainfall draining from the four hundred and thirty thousand acres watershed above Four Holes Swamp, of which Beidler is a part. Think of…
 
Our crew spent a glorious day filming at the Beidler Forest Audubon Center recently, the original portion of which was purchased from the Beidler family in the 1960’s. Francis Beidler was a Chicago businessman who with partner Benjamin Ferguson established the Santee Cypress Lumber Company in eighteen eighty one, purchasing one hundred sixty five t…
 
In many parts of the country, gardeners can’t buy fertilizers that contain phosphorus unless they have soil test results that show the need for that middle number on the fertilizer bag. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium are the three nutrients the percentage of each is listed in that order on every fertilizer package. Nitrogen and potassium are b…
 
Adam Gore, Extension Agent in Abbeville, who’s getting his PhD in turf, talked with us recently about not being in a hurry to get your warm-season turfgrass greened up. Although those big box stores have weed and feed conveniently and temptingly located near the checkout stand right now, March and April are one hundred percent not the right months …
 
When I’ve been to fancy grocery stores in pandemic days, I’m more prone to impulse buying -- why five bags of almond flour and peculiar jars of condiments? The garden centers at big box stores are masters at product placement – with totally inappropriate displays of weed and feed by their check out points right now. Pre-emergent fertilizers for war…
 
Clemson ecology experts T J Savareno and Ben Powell say that having some untidy parts of our yards makes a home friendly to all types of wildlife – from snakes that eat rats, to insects that pollinate our food crops, and for bats that eat harmful agricultural pests and annoying and potentially disease carrying mosquitoes. Bats International says if…
 
DNR’s Heritage sites are an overlooked treasure these days when being outdoors is a safe way to get a break from our restricted lifestyles. Recently, we visited Calhoun County’s Congaree Bluffs Heritage Preserve –saw three other people. There was a bat box there that was on pole maybe fourteen feet or so up in the air as bats need space to drop aft…
 
My brother who lives to hunt, work in his woodshop and do outdoorsy things, got himself appointed to the “Homeowners Ground’s committee” where he had a beach apartment. Surrounded by ladies who came with girl friends for bridge weekends, his sole goal was to convince them to stop insisting that the maintenance crew remove palmetto leaves as soon as…
 
White nose syndrome is an introduced fungal infection that’s exerting huge pressure on certain of our bat species. Some bats require a long and deep hibernation when their body functions slow down dramatically to conserve resources. When infected with this fungus, which concentrates on their faces, giving a white appearance to their nose, it irrita…
 
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