show episodes
 
In “The Future of Everything,” host and Stanford bioengineering professor Russ Altman explores how technology, science and medicine are shaping our lives. From stretchable electronics to ecological surveillance, foldable microscopes and video editing with artificial intelligence, Altman asks his guests to discuss their role in creating the future — of everything. Read more on the Stanford Engineering website: https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/future-everything
 
The Genetic Engineering and Society (GES) Center at NC State University hosts a weekly speakers colloquium, plus periodic public lectures. Topics include agricultural biotechnology, synthetic biology (SynBio), DIYbio, gene editing, gene drives, governance & responsible innovation, public engagement, sci-art, and integrated pest management, to name a few. Learn more at go.ncsu.edu/ges.
 
Sadhguru is an Indian yogi, mystic and author who founded the Isha Foundation, a non-profit organisation which offers yoga programs around the world. Through his Inner Engineering program, Sadhguru shows us why raising human consciousness is vital to our survival. In this age of high-powered technology easily available to almost everyone, the one thing humanity is still missing is Inclusive Consciousness.
 
Welcome to The Psychology Podcast. In each episode, we talk with inspiring scientists, thinkers, and other self-actualized individuals who will give you a greater understanding of yourself, others, and the world we live in. Scott Barry Kaufman explores the depths of human potential and tries to get a glimpse into human possibility in every episode.
 
Utopia or dystopia? It’s up to us.In the 21st century, powerful technologies have been appearing at a breathtaking pace—related to the internet, artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, and more. They have amazing potential upsides, but we can’t ignore the serious risks that come with them.Brave New Planet is a podcast that delves deep into the most exciting and challenging scientific frontiers, helping us understand them and grapple with their implications. Dr. Eric Lander, president a ...
 
What if we had a world we could be proud of? We're saving humanity, one show at a time – because humans are definitely worth saving. This show is an innovation lab, where we figure out solutions to the big existential threats facing the human race – with a big focus on improving global cooperation. And we do it joyfully, because it helps to keep our spirits up. This show is aimed at a global audience. Experts and regular people will find this show useful and interesting. Topics include: clim ...
 
Biology is breaking out of the lab and clinic—and into our daily lives. Our new ability to engineer biology is transforming not just science, research, and healthcare, but how we produce our food, the materials we use, how we manufacture, and much, much more. From the latest scientific advances to the biggest trends, this show explores all the ways biology is today where the computing revolution was 50 years ago: on the precipice of revolutionizing our world in ways we are only just beginnin ...
 
Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
An hour long radio program on science, technology, politics, and the environment. Topics covered include black holes, time travel, higher dimensions, string theory, wormholes, search for extra-terrestial life, dark matter and dark energy, the future of space travel, genetic engineering, the aging process, the future of medicine, the human body shop, artificial intelligence, the future of computers and robots, as well as topics from science fiction. Hosted by Michio Kaku.
 
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GEN Sounds of Science Podcast

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GEN Sounds of Science Podcast

Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News

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Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN) has retained its position as the premier biotech publication since its launch in 1981. GEN publishes a print edition monthly and has additional exclusive editorial content online, including news and analysis as well as webinars, videos, and polls. GEN's unique news and technology focus covers the entire bioproduct life cycle, including drug discovery, early-stage R&D, applied research (e.g., omics, biomarkers, and diagnostics), bioprocessing, an ...
 
GMO Watch, hosted by Emily Journey, explores common questions about food and GMOs. Questions like “Why do I eat organic?”, “Are GMOs bad for you?” or “Do certain food brands have GMOs in them?” Her guests break down the science and trivia behind food so you can come to your own conclusions about what you want to eat. Join in the discussion with Emily Journey at https://gmowatch.com/.
 
Roundtable with Stephanie Robinson is a weekly 30-minute talk-radio program focused on culture, politics and relationships, hosted by dynamic and popular radio personality, Stephanie Robinson. Each week, Stephanie takes on a hot and timely topic to engage her listeners in provocative and action-focused conversations. Robinson’s Roundtable with featured contributors, town hall-style exchanges, Fresh Copy News segments, and piercing analysis all make for lively discussion and debate. Roundtabl ...
 
What is a microbe and what have they ever done for us? From Black Death to Cholera, and Syphilis to Typhoid, microbes have been responsible for some of the world’s most devastating diseases. But they have also provided the human race with the technological advances of genetic engineering and nitrogen fixation, the vision of life on Mars, the life-saving properties of antibiotics and food preservation, along with the wonderful taste of beer. Using expert commentary, animation and stylised vis ...
 
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Rare with Flair

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Rare with Flair

Casey Greer & Cassandra Mendez

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Casey + Cassandra are a pair of best friends with the same rare disease. Their goal is simple: sharing their lives to showcase the beauty and normalcy in disability, while having fun together. They’ll also touch on accessibility, friendships, style, and everything in between as they live their best, rare, lives! For show notes, go to rarewithflair.com/podcasts
 
Bite-sized clips with TED level top thinkers, founders and scientists on how advances in biotech & genomics, space travel, IoT, AI and other exponential tech converge to create our collective future and what we can do, from a research and policy perspective to shape the trends, technologies and societal norms for a better world. Main Podcast: https://disruptors.fm/itunes If in-depth, unscripted conversations with the researchers, startups and future thinkers transforming the future of all of ...
 
Mendelspod was founded in 2011 by Theral Timpson and Ayanna Monteverdi to advance life science research, connecting people and ideas. Influenced by the thinking tools developed by Eli Goldgratt, the founders bring a unique approach to media in the life sciences. With help from our advisors around the industry, Mendelspod goes beyond quick sound bites to create a space for probing conversations and deep insight into the topics and trends which shape the industry's future and therefore our fut ...
 
Profane, insane, and 100% primo science, Petri Dish is a no-BS podcast that explores the wildest subjects in modern science with clarity and evil joy. Hosted by Sean Allen, a Nanoparticle/Immunology Researcher, and Nathan Allen, his "screenwriter" brother, Petri Dish fuses hard science with a freewheeling and madcap conversational style. Cannabinoids, Plague, Cats, the dreaded Candiru, and the even more dreaded Covid-19: all these and more are dissected with intellect and irreverence, droppi ...
 
GLOBAL IMPACT, hosted by Dr. Frederick R. Lester, Chief Executive Officer of GLOBAL AFFAIRS MEDIA, will address strategic issues impacting the global community. Thought leadership will be provided that will elevate listeners' awareness and understanding of complex global issues such as geopolitics of technology and resources, globalization & immigration policy, diplomacy & peace negotiations, global health crisis, political economy of the media, impact of technology on society, humanitariani ...
 
This award-winning series explores The Future of Everything. What can we expect of next week, next year, next century? What will we eat, drive, wear, live in, vote for, want to buy, and want to avoid? What mistakes of the past will we make again, and which ones have we learned from? From the next tick of the clock to the ultimate end of the universe, every subject is fair game. Composed of interviews and essays, it's hosted by the author and futurist Stephen Euin Cobb. Guests include: famous ...
 
The world is so much more than what we know, and only through understanding it better can we make informed decisions. This podcast aims to bring impactful, entertaining and insightful conversations from a global array of guests. Some famous, some you won’t have heard of. From famous explorers, to renowned scientists and just good people, all have a story to tell which we can take something from. Topics are wide ranging, with a backbone centred on conservation, including hunting, fishing, exp ...
 
LID Radio focuses on current trends and features conversations with some of the brightest minds, top experts and influencers in the area of business, entrepreneurship, smart thinking and personal development. It is the podcast of choice for those seeking practical advice, smart solutions and information to achieve success in their professional and personal lives.
 
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Learning Machines 101

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Learning Machines 101

Richard M. Golden, Ph.D., M.S.E.E., B.S.E.E.

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Smart machines based upon the principles of artificial intelligence and machine learning are now prevalent in our everyday life. For example, artificially intelligent systems recognize our voices, sort our pictures, make purchasing suggestions, and can automatically fly planes and drive cars. In this podcast series, we examine such questions such as: How do these devices work? Where do they come from? And how can we make them even smarter and more human-like? These are the questions that wil ...
 
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show series
 
Nov 24 – FS Insider welcomes Woody Preucil, Senior Managing Director at 13D Strategy and Research, to discuss the record sales numbers towards robotics and automation post-Covid by industries worldwide and says that developments...By fswebmaster@financialsense.com (Financial Sense)
 
Life as We Made It' charts the past and future of genetic tinkering A new book explores humans' enduring role as meddlers in evolution Genetically engineered glow-in-the-dark fish (shown) are a relatively recent phenomenon, but there's nothing new about humans tinkering with other creatures' genes, as described in Life as We Made It.…
 
It’s the most consequential climate meeting in a generation. COP26 is underway and we’re bringing you special episodes of the podcast featuring in-depth analysis and interviews. Reporter Graham Lawton is in Glasgow and shares his experiences of the event, discussing positive news about “game-changing” pledges to cut methane emissions. There have be…
 
In this episode of All Gas No Brakes, we explore the topic of human genome editing. What is it, and how could it potentially affect those living with physical disability? Was my own birth the result of some horrible medical experiment gone wrong? We discuss CRISPR and how this breakthrough scientific technology may one day move us closer and closer…
 
Nov 27 – Well, just as shoppers hit the malls on Black Friday, global stock markets were hit by omicron—the newly named ‘variant of concern’ that has led to a fresh wave of travel restrictions.... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribeBy fswebmaster@financialsense.com (Financial Sense)
 
"The wise man has knowledge as far as possible of all things." - AristotleIn this episode of the Magnus Podcast, Dr. David Arias explores Aristotle’s understanding of being-as-being and axioms and their connection to the study of Metaphysics.The soul grows the body. So join the Fellowship today and become wiser and better looking.MagnusInstitute.or…
 
On this episode of the Far Out with Faust podcast, we’re delving into the necessity of exposing and resolving dysfunctional programming caused by childhood trauma to achieve peak performance, stress relief, and happiness. Dr. Don Wood, creator of the Inspired Performance Method, is a psychologist who applies the principles of neuroscience to transf…
 
Where did covid-19 really come from? Well, the team explains why the wet market in Wuhan is back on top as the most likely place of origin. They also look ahead to the future of the pandemic, as the delta variant continues to run rampant across the globe. In eyesight news, forget carrots - if you want to improve your vision all you need (maybe) is …
 
In this episode, I talk to renowned neuroscientist Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett about emotions and the brain. She reveals what the true function of the brain is⎯and it’s not for thinking. We also discuss the impact of past experiences on our cognition and what we can do to overcome our own detrimental patterns. Further into our discussion, Dr. Lisa cha…
 
Nov 24 – FS Insider welcomes Woody Preucil, Senior Managing Director at 13D Strategy and Research, to discuss the record sales numbers towards robotics and automation post-Covid by industries... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribeBy fswebmaster@financialsense.com (Financial Sense)
 
On this episode of the Far Out with Faust podcast, meet the premiere Google whistleblower Zach Vorhies, a former employee who exposed the covert Google algorithm called Machine Learning Fairness. This Google keyword manipulation scheme marked the Internet giant’s foray into Big Tech censorship to promote its own self-serving globalist agenda. Zach …
 
The body has a natural cellular recycling machinery known as the ubiquitin proteasome system that breaks down unwanted proteins. Kymera Therapeutics has developed a drug discovery platform that exploits this natural biologic process to target disease-causing proteins that had been previously considered undruggable using small molecule therapies. We…
 
It’s Metaphysics week on the Magnus Podcast. Join Senior Fellow David Arias for the opening lecture of his course in the Fellowship on Metaphysics. Explore the first two books of Aristotle’s Metaphysics and groundwork for the study of being.Want to hear the whole course? Of course you do. AMI Felllows giving at least $25 per month get ALL ACCESS to…
 
Nov 23 – FS Insider speaks with Bloomberg Chief US Economist Anna Wong about how long global supply chain pressures will likely persist, their outlook for inflation and why it hasn't peaked yet, her... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribeBy fswebmaster@financialsense.com (Financial Sense)
 
Genetic Engineering and Society Center GES Colloquium - Tuesdays 12-1PM (via Zoom) NC State University | http://go.ncsu.edu/ges-colloquiumGES Mediasite - See videos, full abstracts, speaker bios, and slides https://go.ncsu.edu/ges-mediasiteTwitter - https://twitter.com/GESCenterNCSU Carbon Sequestration & GHG Mitigation in Carinata Cropping Systems…
 
Nov 22 – There are a number of things that need to be done in case a spouse or loved one passes away, whether notifying various government agencies like social security or reaching out to life... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribeBy fswebmaster@financialsense.com (Financial Sense)
 
Nov 22 – There are a number of things that need to be done in case a spouse or loved one passes away, whether notifying various government agencies like social security or reaching out to life insurance companies, banks, credit card companies...By fswebmaster@financialsense.com (Financial Sense)
 
Karey Spransy is a resilience coach who knows what it’s like to feel overwhelmed and pushed down by life. Her experiences as a single teen mother, losing two loved ones to suicide, going through two divorces, and battling stage IV-4 colon cancer taught her how to use setbacks as springboards and failures as fuel. For a self-professed extrovert and …
 
An agile gecko found in India named after the legendary Jackie Chan 12 newly described gecko species get scientific names inspired by their features An extremely agile gecko found in the Western Ghats of India is named Jackie's day gecko ( Cnemaspis jackieii) after martial arts legend Jackie Chan.
 
How catching birds bare-handed may hint at Neandertals' hunting tactics Using tools Neandertals might have had, researchers test the ancient hominids' hunting abilities A red-billed chough ( Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax ) is an elusive species to hunt during the day.
 
Here's the physics of why ducklings swim in a row behind their mother By paddling in just the right spots, ducklings save energy by surfing their mom's waves Many ducklings, such as these mallards ( Anas platyrhynchos ) trail their mothers in orderly lines.
 
Astronomers may have spotted the first known exoplanet in another galaxy The planet appears to orbit a massive star circling a dead star in the Whirlpool galaxy The spiral-shaped Whirlpool galaxy may be the host of the first planet spotted outside of the Milky Way.
 
The fastest-spinning white dwarf ever seen rotates once every 25 seconds The star's rotation period beats the previous champion by five seconds A white dwarf star (left) can spin fast after a red dwarf star (right) dumps gas onto it, as shown in this artwork of the binary star system AE Aquarii.
 
Doubt cast on theorized 'sterile' particles leaves a neutrino mystery unsolved A highly reclusive variety of the lightweight subatomic particles seems less likely The MicroBooNE detector (shown under construction) observes particles produced when neutrinos interact inside.
 
Space rocks may have bounced off baby Earth, but slammed into Venus Those responses to long-ago collisions could help explain why the two worlds are so different The early solar system may have been full of collisions between baby planets (one smashup shown in this artist's illustration).
 
An atomic clock measured how general relativity warps time across a millimeter The record-breaking result reveals the incredible precision achievable by atomic clocks Clocks at different heights tick at different rates.
 
An ancient exploding comet may explain why glass litters part of Chile An airburst over the Atacama Desert 12,000 years ago melted the ground into glass, scientists say A 75-kilometer-long stretch of the Atacama Desert is home to twisted chunks of glass (dark chunks in this image).
 
How these sea-loving mangroves ended up far from the coast Warming more than 100,000 years ago raised sea levels and displaced the plants far inland Fish and other aquatic life in the San Pedro Mártir River on the Yucatán Peninsula find refuge in the submerged roots of a red mangrove forest.
 
How massive stars in binary systems turn into carbon factories Massive stars with partners cast about twice as much carbon into space as their single peers A massive star can give its galaxy lots of new carbon, especially if another star orbits the massive one.
 
Scientists found modern domestic horses' homeland in southwestern Russia Two genes tied to endurance and docility may help explain the equines' success The modern domestic horse (seen here in Mongolia) powered much of recent human history.
 
This eco-friendly glitter gets its color from plants, not plastic Minuscule arrangements in cellulose reflect light in specific ways to give rise to vibrant hues Glitter and shimmery pigments are often made using toxic, pollutive materials.
 
Tuskless elephants became common as an evolutionary response to poachers Gorongosa National Park's elephants bear the physical consequences of poaching's legacy In Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, poaching pressure during the country's civil war led to an increase of naturally tuskless elephants.…
 
A new map shows where carbon needs to stay in nature to avoid climate disaster Releasing the carbon stored in vulnerable ecosystems could push global warming past 1.5 degrees Celsius Old-growth forests, like this stand of redwood trees in California, store a lot of climate-warming carbon that would be lost to the atmosphere if the trees were cut do…
 
Lidar reveals a possible blueprint for many Olmec and Maya ceremonial sites Similar ceremonial layouts connected ancient societies across Mexico's Gulf Coast A ceremonial complex built more than 3,000 years ago at an Olmec center on what's now Mexico's Gulf Coast influenced corresponding sites across the region for two millennia, remote-sensing dat…
 
How climate change may shape the world in the centuries to come As 2100 looms closer, climate projections should look farther into the future, scientists say Combining climate simulations with art, researchers envision a hotter future by 2500 that may transform landscapes across Earth, such as the Indian subcontinent, as shown here in an artist's p…
 
Scientists finally detected a quantum effect that blocks atoms from scattering light When all available quantum states are full, ultracold atom clouds become more transparent In an ultracold, dense cloud of atoms (blue), a quantum effect dictates whether atoms scatter light (red arrows).
 
Distant rocky planets may have exotic chemical makeups that don't resemble Earth's Debris on white dwarf stars offers a possible peek inside the worlds that once orbited them Debris from a destroyed rocky planet (illustrated) circles and falls onto a white dwarf star.
 
The Dawn of Everything' rewrites 40,000 years of human history A new book recasts social evolution as surprisingly varied Social evolution, from Ice Age hunter-gatherer networks to ancient Egypt's pyramid-building dynasties and beyond, gets reinterpreted in a new book as a series of flexible systems that didn't inevitably produce rampant inequality…
 
New high-speed video reveals the physics of a finger snap Friction plus compressibility of the finger pads are key to a speedy snap A finger snap produces one of the fastest rotational motions known in the human body, almost as fast as some professional baseball pitchers' arms.
 
No, COVID-19 vaccines won't make you infertile Data show the vaccines do not cause infertility, but getting coronavirus can Macrine Achieng, a nurse with CFK Africa, preparing to administer a COVID-19 vaccine to a patient at the organization's Tabitha Medical Clinic in Kibera, Kenya.
 
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