show episodes
 
The Center for Nursing Inquiry oversees the scholarly work of nurses in the Johns Hopkins Health System. Our goal is to build the capacity for nurses to participate in the three forms of inquiry: research, evidence-based practice (EBP), and quality improvement (QI). At the Center for Nursing Inquiry, we offer a variety of educational resources and expert guidance to help nurses engage in meaningful, high-quality scholarly work. We are dedicated to advancing the science of nursing. Stay conne ...
 
Join physicians at Johns Hopkins Medicine for its women’s health podcast series, A Woman’s Journey: Insights That Matter, on the first Thursday of each month. Host Lillie Shockney, acclaimed humorist cancer survivor, and nurse, discusses Women and Heart Disease; Symptoms You Shouldn’t Ignore; Mindfulness; Sleep; The Microbiome; Advances in Breast Cancer Treatment; Brain Research; A-fib; Kidney Disease in Women of Color; and Memory with Johns Hopkins experts. Learn about medical advances and ...
 
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Doctor Thyroid

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Doctor Thyroid

Philip James interviews top thyroid experts about surgery, nutrition, endoc

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This show is for thyroid patients determined to improve their quality of life, with the best information available. You will gain insight from those who have discovered improved well-being regardless of setbacks, and hear from leading healthcare professionals, including endocrinologists, surgeons, functional medicine practitioners, and radiologists.
 
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On Becoming a Healer

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On Becoming a Healer

Saul J. Weiner and Stefan Kertesz

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Two physicians, through dialogue and interviews, take a critical look at medical training and the culture of medicine and explore how interpersonal boundary clarity and the capacity to fully engage are essential to effective medical practice, mentoring, medical education, and a nourishing career. This podcast builds on Dr. Weiner’s book, On Becoming a Healer: The Journey from Patient Care to Caring about Your Patients (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020). Hosted by Saul J. Weiner MD, and S ...
 
Jessica Houston is an award winning, Johns Hopkins-trained nutritionist, creator of EatClean30 and founder of Vitamin & Me. She is deconstructing the health space and bringing you access and clear guidance straight from the world's leading experts on strategies to increase healthspan, mental and physical wellbeing through a deeper understanding of nutrition, fitness and wellness. On this podcast, we take you behind the scenes with top global health leaders so you can learn what proper nutrit ...
 
Dr. Mark Vaughan reviews COVID-19 (Coronavirus or SARS-CoV-2) pandemic news updates. Updates are based on daily news and scientific reports and are usually shorter than 5 minutes. Most of the information is gleaned from the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security daily updates among other sources of health and medical news stories. Dr. Vaughan is the Medical Director of the Auburn Medical Group. He also serves on the Board of Directors for Sutter Independent Physicians. Learn about the Aubu ...
 
In the medical world, I'm an internist and primary care doctor at Johns Hopkins. I see patients, do research on decision-making, uncertainty, and patient-doctor communication; I teach with residents; and I write about the complexities of healthcare. In the non-medical world, I write in English and Yiddish, translating as well between both languages. I publish poetry, short stories, and essays/journalism.
 
Informative and entertaining stories from the editors of the journal Medicine featuring article highlights, hot topics, and other things on their minds. The journal, published every other month and now in its 90th year, includes scholarly reviews and clinical descriptions of patients from the experience of leading clinicians from around the world in the areas of internal medicine, dermatology, neurology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. The editors, David Hellmann, John Bartlett, Howard Lederman, ...
 
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Crosswinds

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Crosswinds

Tom Robertson and the Vizient Research Institute

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Crosswinds is a series of casual conversations with national thought leaders hosted by Tom Robertson, executive director of the Vizient Research Institute. New episodes released every month feature the brightest people in health care considering questions that others haven’t thought to ask – always remarkable, never exactly what you’d expect, and having fun along the way. Crosswinds: Two old friends sitting in comfortable chairs… talking.
 
At the Rodham Institute, we work to alleviate health disparities in Washington, DC through a multipronged approach utilizing our position as a part of an academic medical center—George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. This podcast series examines issues of health disparities from several perspectives, bringing in the voices of doctors, academic researchers, and patients themselves. Produced and voiced by Diana Hla, a senior at Johns Hopkins University, and David ...
 
Johns Hopkins Medicine is pleased to present its health and medicine podcast, a lively discussion of the week’s medical news and how it may affect you. This five to seven-minute free program features Elizabeth Tracey, director of electronic media for Johns Hopkins Medicine, and Rick Lange M.D., professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins and vice chairman of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.
 
Hosted by Bill Curtis and quadruple board certified Dr. Steven Taback, Medicine, We’re Still Practicing sits down with doctors from the world’s most preeminent hospitals for insights into their research, practice, and education. The first in this dedicated series is Johns Hopkins Medicine, with the goal of not only to share the magnificent work being done by these hospitals and doctors, but for them to be able to use it as a high-quality educational tool and platform to share insights and re ...
 
Emory Braincast is the official Emory Psychiatry podcast. We interview everyone from experts to trainees to give you a unique taste of psychiatry. The Emory way. Music attributed to Kevin Macleod: "Quirky Dog" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
 
Welcome to the WAG Your Work Podcast! Writing Accountability Groups (WAGs) began when Kimberly Skarupski, PhD, MPH of Johns Hopkins Medicine started gathering faculty to meet once a week in small groups with a clear goal of developing an unbreakable writing habit. The WAGs method makes writing automatic, mechanical and as routine as tying your shoes... there's nothing magical or mysterious about writing. Stay tuned to the WAG Your Work Podcast to learn more about WAGs and overcoming common b ...
 
Do you want to learn how to become a successful and happy MD? Yes? Well then this show is for you. Each week we bring you an inspiring person or message to help you unlock your full potential. You’ll learn the career secrets of some of the most successful doctors in the world, how they got to where they are, how they learn, their attitudes, what they look for in a young physician and much, much more. We try to reveal the success strategies that no one ever teaches you in medical school. You’ ...
 
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show series
 
In this next podcast, Elizabeth Scala and Maddie Whalen discuss a topic that’s specific to Evidence-Based Practice projects which is the difference between a background question and a foreground question. Maddie discusses a project that she helped staff with and their use of a background question in the PICO format. Finally, they wrap up the […]…
 
Remote monitoring helps people undergoing treatment for cancer cope better with emerging symptoms, a new study concludes. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says this strategy may be even more important as new cancer treatments are developed. Nelson: One of the things about chemotherapy is we sort of have a […]…
 
If you’re a parent of a child younger than 12 years of age you may be struggling with the simplest of decisions right now regarding their welfare, a recent survey suggests, largely because of concerns about COVID-19. Helen Hughes, a pediatrician at Johns Hopkins, says she is hearing this from parents again and again. Hughes: […]…
 
How can consumers, nations, and international organizations work together to improve food systems before our planet loses its ability to sustain itself and its people? Do we have the right to eat wrongly? As the world's agricultural, environmental, and nutritional needs intersect—and often collide—how can consumers, nations, and international organ…
 
There is a long history of protecting health care workers during conflict, beginning with an 1859 battle in Italy that gave rise to the first Geneva Convention. But there’s never been a “golden age of compliance” and health care workers continue to face considerable risk while trying to reduce human suffering in war zones. Len Rubenstein, a public …
 
Underlying every great city is a rich and vibrant culture that shapes the texture of life within. In The Speculative City: Art, Real Estate, and the Making of Global Los Angeles (U Minnesota Press, 2021), Susanna Phillips Newbury teases out how art and Los Angeles shaped one another’s evolution. She compellingly articulates how together they transf…
 
Why are white evangelicals the most skeptical major religious group in America regarding climate change? Previous scholarship has pointed to cognitive factors such as conservative politics, anti-science attitudes, aversion to big government, and theology. Drawing on qualitative fieldwork, Robin Veldman's book The Gospel of Climate Skepticism: Why E…
 
Tracing Mead’s career as an ethnographer, as the early voice of public anthropology, and as a public figure, this elegantly written biography links the professional and personal sides of her career. Paul Shankman's Margaret Mead (Berghahn Books, 2021) looks at Mead’s early career through the end of World War II, when she produced her most important…
 
Oklahoma's Black towns aren't just places of the past - they maintain an enduring allure, and look toward the future, argues Karla Slocum in her new book, Black Towns, Black Futures: The Enduring Allure of a Black Place in the American West (UNC Press, 2019). Dr. Slocum, the Thomas Willis Lambeth Chair of Public Policy and a professor of Anthropolo…
 
In this next podcast, Elizabeth Scala and Maddie Whalen discuss a topic that’s specific to Evidence-Based Practice projects which is the difference between a background question and a foreground question. Maddie discusses a project that she helped staff with and their use of a background question in the PICO format. Finally, they wrap up the […]…
 
In this next podcast, Elizabeth Scala and Maddie Whalen discuss a topic that’s specific to Evidence-Based Practice projects which is the difference between a background question and a foreground question. Maddie discusses a project that she helped staff with and their use of a background question in the PICO format. Finally, they wrap up the […]…
 
How Payers and Providers Can Drive Better Health Literacy in Underserved Communities Dr. Lisa Fitzpatrick, CEO and Founder of Grapevine Health has dedicated her life to improving Health Literacy and diffusing the distrust around healthcare in our underserved communities. During this interview, Lisa shares strategies and tactics to help for payers a…
 
The Plant-Based Athlete: A Game-Changing Approach to Peak Performance (HarperOne, 2021) by Matt Frazier and Robert Cheeke reveals the incontrovertible proof that the human body does not need meat, eggs, or dairy to be strong. Instead, research shows that a consciously calibrated plant-based diet offers the greatest possible recovery times, cell oxi…
 
In July 1947, not even three months after Jackie Robinson debuted on the Brooklyn Dodgers, snapping the color line that had segregated Major League Baseball, Larry Doby would follow in his footsteps on the Cleveland Indians. Though Doby, as the second Black player in the majors, would struggle during his first summer in Cleveland, his subsequent tu…
 
Hamilton: An American Musical made its record-breaking Broadway debut in 2015—but the musical has reached far beyond typical Broadway audiences to pave a path into political discourse, pop culture, classroom curriculums, and the broader conversation about contemporary American politics. What led to this chain reaction of popularity, and how does it…
 
All regions and places are unique in their own way, but the Ozarks have an enduring place in American culture. Studying the Ozarks offers the ability to explore American life through the lens of one of the last remaining cultural frontiers in American society. Perhaps because the Ozarks were relatively isolated from mainstream American society, or …
 
Carla Duenas, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health in Miami, is a sports nutrition powerhouse. Like many in Miami, Carla came to South Florida as a child. Delicious foods have always been a part of her culture. Inspired by her own desire to learn about nutrition and her love of sports, she now trains athletes from all over the world on the scie…
 
For a year and a half, Johns Hopkins infectious disease doctor Kelly Gebo has been working with people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Gebo and a team of medical professionals triage COVID outpatients in a “pod” outside of the hospital where people diagnosed with COVID can come for convalescent plasma and care. Gebo talks about seeing patien…
 
How could you lose your memory overnight, and what would it mean? The day neurologist Jed Barash sees the baffling brain scan of a young patient with devastating amnesia marks the beginning of a quest to answer those questions. First detected in a cluster of stigmatized opioid overdose victims in Massachusetts with severe damage to the hippocampus-…
 
From Double Indemnity to The Godfather, the stories behind some of the greatest films ever made pale beside the story of the studio that made them. In the golden age of Hollywood, Paramount was one of the Big Five studios. Gulf + Western's 1966 takeover of the studio signaled the end of one era and heralded the arrival of a new way of doing busines…
 
The Watergate scandal was a horror show. What better way to satirize it than with a horror movie? The Texas Chain Saw Massacre written by Tobe Hooper and Kim Henkel premiered in October 1974, mere weeks after the resignation and pardon of Richard Nixon brought an uncertain end to the most corrupt and criminal presidency in American history. The fil…
 
Between 1942 and 1945, the United States government forcibly removed approximately 120,000 people "of Japanese ancestry" from their homes and into self-proclaimed concentration camps across the American West and South. At every step in the way, social workers played integral roles in the intricate machinery of racism and bureaucracy that allowed th…
 
The Picky Eagle: How Democracy and Xenophobia Limited U. S. Territorial Expansion (Cornell UP, 2020) explains why the United States stopped annexing territory by focusing on annexation's domestic consequences, both political and normative. It describes how the U.S. rejection of further annexations, despite its rising power, set the stage for twenti…
 
Teri A. McMurtry-Chubb is the author of Race Unequals: Overseer Contracts, White Masculinities, and the Formation of Managerial Identity in the Plantation Economy, published by Lexington Books in 2021. Race Unequals takes a look at the complex relationship between enslavers and overseers in order to explore the ways in which the “white South” was n…
 
Conventional wisdom about running is passed down like folklore (and sometimes contradicts itself): the right kind of shoe prevents injury—or running barefoot, like our prehistoric ancestors, is best; eat a high-fat diet—and also carbo load before a race; running cures depression—but it might be addictive; running can save your life—although it can …
 
Every day Chicagoans rely on the loop of elevated train tracks to get to their jobs, classrooms, or homes in the city’s downtown. But how much do they know about the single most important structure in the history of the Windy City? In engagingly brisk prose, Patrick T. Reardon unfolds the fascinating story about how Chicago’s elevated Loop was buil…
 
Battling Protestants is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and intellectual historian David Hollinger, UC Berkeley, and examines the unique role that different strands of religion have played in 20th-century American culture. The conversation examines intriguing aspects of the distinction between Ecumenical and Evangelic…
 
Before Farah Jasmine Griffin’s father died, he wrote to her a note ending with a line “read until you understand.” He would die years later when she was nine, and that line has guided her literary curiosity. In Read Until You Understand: The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature (Norton, 2021), Griffin shares the indispensable lessons of Bla…
 
What's it like to cover Donald Trump? In this episode, veteran American journalist Allen Salkin explains. For over three decades, Salkin has written about many things for many high-profile publications, including The New York Post, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Atlantic and others. He is also the author of a number of well-received…
 
Gene Slater's book Free to Discriminate: How the Nation's Realtors Created Housing Segregation and the Conservative Vision of American Freedom (Hayday Books, 2021) uncovers realtors' definitive role in segregating America and shaping modern conservative thought. Gene Slater follows this story from inside the realtor profession, drawing on many indu…
 
There are over 50 million Americans who are eligible to vote but are not registered. VoteEr is an organization at the intersection of health and voting, providing kits for health care offices and ERs that help patients check their registration status or easily register via a text message code while waiting to be seen. Dr. Alister Martin, VoteER’s f…
 
Matt Kaeberlein is globally recognized for his research on the biology of aging and is a previous guest on The Drive. In this episode, Matt defines aging, the relationship between aging, chronic inflammation, and the immune system, and talks extensively about the most exciting molecules for extending lifespan. He discusses the current state of the …
 
When terrorists struck the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 a small fleet of boats on a rescue mission converged on lower Manhattan. In one of the less told stories of 9/11, on those vessels—which ranged from ferries to tug boats to boats that host dinner cruises—mariners carried to safety almost half a million people. Saved at the Seawall:…
 
Today’s Postscript (a special series that allows scholars to comment on pressing contemporary issues) engages the latest chapter in American abortion politics as the United States Supreme Court has just allowed a Texas statute banning abortions after 6 weeks to go into effect. Lilly Goren and Susan Liebell have assembled a panel of experts in polit…
 
In Child Sexual Abuse Inquiries and the Catholic Church: Reassessing the Evidence (Firenze UP, 2021), Dr Miller analyses empirical findings, methodologies and conclusions of the three main national inquiries (Irish, US, Australian) into child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, and Church responses. Contrasts are drawn with overall media reporting…
 
Public disenchantment with and distrust of American government is at an all-time high and who can blame them? In the face of widespread challenges--everything from record levels of personal and national debt and the sky high cost of education, to gun violence, racial discrimination, an immigration crisis, overpriced pharmaceuticals, and much more--…
 
In recognition of the 20th anniversary of the 9-11 terrorist attacks and the Anthrax events in the weeks that followed, Dr. Josh Sharfstein talks with Dr. Tom Inglesby of the Center for Health Security about the transformational impacts these events had on public health. They discuss what the attacks revealed about the US’s vulnerabilities, how an …
 
In The Life and Times of Louis Lomax: The Art of Deliberate Disunity (Duke University Press, 2021), Thomas Aiello traces the complicated and fascinating life of a pioneering Black journalist and media personality. A witness to some of the most iconic moments of the 1960s, Lomax remains an important yet overlooked civil rights figure, who emerged as…
 
Women performers played a vital role in the development of American and transatlantic entertainment, celebrity culture, and gender ideology. In Starring Women: Celebrity, Patriarchy, and American Theater, 1790-1851 (U Illinois Press, 2020), Sara E. Lampert examines the lives, careers, and fame of overlooked figures from Europe and the United States…
 
Our guest, a resident physician, describes her reaction and what followed, when she discovered a symbol of hate tattooed on her hospitalized patient's leg. Most of us appreciate that as physicians we don't get to choose who are patients are, and that all deserve good care. But is there more to it than that? Can one grow as a physician and person, a…
 
Political Scientist Ursula Hackett’s new book, America's Voucher Politics: How Elites Learned to Hide the State (Cambridge UP, 2020), is the winner of the APSA 2021 Education Policy and Politics Section Best Book Award. America’s Voucher Politics examines the way that the approach to vouchers, as a policy design and as a point of advocacy, has evol…
 
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