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Literature enthusiast Jacke Wilson journeys through the history of literature, from ancient epics to contemporary classics. (Episodes are not in chronological order and you don't need to start at the beginning - feel free to jump in wherever you like!) Find out more at historyofliterature.com and facebook.com/historyofliterature. Support the show by visiting patreon.com/literature or paypal.me/jackewilson. Contact the host at jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com.
 
Welcome to Lead With Soul — The podcast for spiritual entrepreneurs who are ready to build an impactful and profitable brand, create a thriving and sustainable business that aligns with your values, and experience more freedom, fulfillment, and abundance in your life and business — while making a positive difference in the world. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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During his lifetime, Wallace Stegner (1909-1993) became famous for his prizewinning fiction and autobiographical works; his dedication to environmental causes; and his initiation of the creative writing program at Stanford University that bears his name. His most celebrated works, including Angle of Repose, The Spectator Bird, and Crossing to Safet…
 
Summertime! The season for watching blockbuster movies in arctic conditions, heart-pounding suspense flicks that heat the blood, and cool-breeze dramas that stir the soul. In this best-of episode, Jacke celebrates the summer with portions of conversations with three previous guests, Brian Price, Meg Tilly, and Mike Palindrome. Additional listening …
 
We are super fucking angry, sad, and enraged. Guess why. We talk to Kimberly Inez McGuire of URGE, Unite for Reproductive and Gender Equity, about power, control, and papayas. Plus, Biz is pissed. Go to URGE.org to learn more. To learn about self-managed abortion, mifepristone, and misoprostol, please check out URGE.org/smazine. Check out URGE's li…
 
This week on City Limits, Kevin and Karina speak with Mark Riley, Mayor of the council formerly known as Moreland. He discusses the decision behind the name change, Jamaican slave plantation roots of the name 'Moreland', and the process by which the Council formally accepted and endorsed 3 name options offered by the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung Cultural…
 
Very few novelists can match the ambition or output of French novelist Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850). A pioneer of the great nineteenth-century "realism" tradition, his novel sequence La Comédie Humaine presents a panoramic view of post-Napoleonic France. Containing something like 90 finished novels and novellas, Balzac's achievement has influenced …
 
Whee! Come to the messy playground where we learn that funny doesn't need to be cruel. Biz is joined by Nicole Blaine, comic and founder of The Crow comedy club, to talk epic love stories, the films of Sally Field, and the gift of comedy as communication. Plus, Biz is alone. Check out Theresa’s book! It Feels Good To Be Yourself is available now wh…
 
It's the Christina Rossetti episode! Jacke finally musters up the energy to finish what he started, and takes a look at one of the great poets of the Victorian era (and the creator of "Goblin Market," one of the strangest poems he has ever read. How did this seemingly prim, even matronly woman, known for her religious devotion and for rejecting thr…
 
Because Jacke could not stop for the scheduled episode topics, a certain poem kindly stopped for him. Luckily it's one of the greatest poems of all time! It's by the 19th-century American genius Emily Dickinson, and it packs into seven short stanzas a journey through life, death, and the cosmos. Read a copy of the poem here: Because I could not sto…
 
It's one of the great mysteries in American history. The "lost colony" of Roanoke Island, where 120 or so men, women, and children living in the first permanent English settlement in North America simply disappeared, leaving behind nothing but a mysterious word carved into a tree trunk. While historians remain baffled, speculation has run rampant, …
 
How do you raise an antiracist? Step One: Stop clutching the pearls! Ibram X. Kendi, founding Director of the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research and author of How To Raise An Antiracist, joins Biz to talk about "child-proofing," the sound of denial, and terrifying our kids versus protecting them. Plus, Biz is open for Summer! Get your…
 
In his lifetime, the Romantic poet and engraver William Blake (1757-1827) was barely known and frequently misunderstood. Today, his genius is widely celebrated and his poems are some of the most famous in the English language - and yet we still struggle to comprehend his unique way of seeing the world. In this episode, Blakean biographer John Higgs…
 
If Superman was a real hero, he'd just volunteer to hold the baby while you go to the bathroom. Veteran reporter Gloria Riviera sits down with Biz to discuss the childcare crisis, crying in the recording booth, and the never-ending need for paper towels. Plus, Biz goes to the library. Listen to No One Is Coming To Save Us on the podcatcher of your …
 
As a devout and passionate religious observer, Victorian poet Christina Rossetti (1830-1894) lived a life that might seem, at first glance, as proper and tame. Even some of her greatest works, devotional poems and verses for children, strike us as just the kind of art a fine upstanding moralist might generate. But there was more to Christina Rosset…
 
Money. Sex. Power. Family. Those are the conceits at the heart of Henry James's late-period masterpiece, The Golden Bowl. In this episode, Jacke talks to author Dinitia Smith, whose new novel The Prince reinvigorates this classic story of a wealthy American widower, his doting daughter, her charismatic foreign husband, and the childhood friend whos…
 
It's the Umpteenth Genius Fail Spectacular Plus Rant, Memorial Day 2022 Edition! Woooooo! Check out Theresa’s book! It Feels Good To Be Yourself is available now wherever books are sold. Our book You’re Doing A Great Job!: 100 Ways You’re Winning at Parenting! is available wherever books are sold. Thank you to all our listeners who support the show…
 
In this episode, we resume our look at Walt Whitman's life and body of work, focusing in particular on the years 1840-1855. Did Whitman's teaching career end with him being tarred and feathered by an angry mob, as has long been rumored? What happened during his three months in New Orleans? And how did this printer and hack writer wind up writing th…
 
In this best-of History of Literature episode, Jacke revisits the topic of war and literature with three guests: Professor Elizabeth Samet (Soldier's Heart: Reading Literature Through Peace and War at West Point), who teaches literature to military officers in training; Matt Gallagher (Empire City and Youngblood), a veteran who served in Iraq; and …
 
In 1844, Ralph Waldo Emerson called for a new poet who would reflect the spirit and potential of America. In 1855, a then-unknown poet named Walt Whitman published Leaves of Grass, his attempt to fulfill Emerson's wish. In this episode, Jacke looks at Whitman's early life and career, contrasting Leaves of Grass with the works of a pair of poets tha…
 
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