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Islam, réforme et colonisation: une histoire de l'ibadisme en Algérie (1882-1962) by Augustin Jomier is an important study of colonial North Africa, Islamic reform, and Ibadi Islam. Jomier, a professor at France’s Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales in Paris, has reframed the history of colonial Algeria by examining it “from t…
 
If you're interested in a satirical book about spies, community, and integration during the late 1960s-70s then my discussion of The Spook Who Sat By the Door is for you. Written by Sam Greenlee in the 60s, the book offers a lot of commentary on the self-serving nature of liberal politicians and activists, institutional racism, and the assimilation…
 
Understanding how people cope with large-scale traumatic events has become more urgent as we continue to cope with the effects of the pandemic. In Resonant Recoveries: French Music and Trauma Between the World Wars (Oxford University Press, 2021), Jillian Rogers examines France in the aftermath of World War I, which left its residents mourning a lo…
 
A review of the movie "Love & Basketball", a decent movie with a problematic love story that is absolute trash but gets a pass. The odds are that you’ve already seen "Love & Basketball". I’d like your perspective if you agree with my take on the movie. But I also want all the smoke if you disagree with my assessment. Show notes are available at htt…
 
Steven Press is an Assistant Professor of History at Stanford University. His marvelous first book, Rogue Empires: Contracts and Conmen in Europe’s Scramble for Africa (Harvard University Press, 2017), is an incredibly well-documented monograph that follows a paper trail of questionable treaties to discover the rogues or confidence men whose action…
 
If you are looking for a new literary classic that perfectly summarizes the history of race relations in the UK while also breaking down how racist institutions are preserved by refusing to discuss racism then my review of "Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race" is for you. Show notes are available at http://noirehistoir.com/blog/why…
 
If you're interested in learning about a Harlem-based activist and organization with plans for building a network of global independent Black companies and a Black-ruled nation in Africa then my Marcus Garvey & The UNIA Black History Short Part Two is for you. Show notes and sources are available at http://noirehistoir.com/blog/marcus-garvey-unia.…
 
In City of a Million Dreams: A History of New Orleans at Year 300 (University of North Carolina Press, 2018), Jason Berry delivers a history of New Orleans at its tricentennial. Beyond its ancient streets, jazz, and Carnival lies a richer, more textured New Orleans than anyone imagined. Berry spotlights the tension between a culture of spectacle, r…
 
Albert Camus, one of the most famous French philosophers and novelists, has a diverse fan base. British alternative rockers The Cure sang about The Stranger in their first big hit, “Killing an Arab”, released in 1980. George W. Bush announced that the novel was his summer reading in 2006 (considering the book’s central plot point and what he had un…
 
The preface to Robin Mitchell's new book, Vénus Noire: Black Women and Colonial Fantasies in Nineteenth-Century France (University of Georgia Press, 2020) moves me. In it, the author tells the story of her first research trip to Paris and the profound moment of her encounter with a plaster cast of Sarah Baartmann's body at the Musée de l'Homme. It …
 
How did the "Reign of Terror" end? In his new book, The Afterlives of Terror: Facing the Legacies of Mass Violence in Postrevolutionary France (Cornell University Press, 2019), Ronen Steinberg explores the end of "the Terror" of 1793-94 as a process that included a range of legal, material, ethical, psychological, and emotional challenges. From the…
 
Project Europe made waves when it was published in German in 2018 (CH Beck) and was soon translated into English as Project Europe: A History (Cambridge UP, 2020). A clue to its crossover appeal can be found in its original subtitle: "A Critical History." Avoiding the traps of euro-'Whig' or eurosceptical histories, Patel rethinks the development o…
 
On today’s New Books in History, we sit down with Dr. Nimisha Barton to discuss her new book, Reproductive Citizens: Gender, Immigration, and the State in Modern France (Cornell University Press, 2020). This conversation is a perfect supplemental teaching tool to assign a class reading Reproductive Citizens as is the impressive digital appendices t…
 
Digitizing Enlightenment: Digital Humanities and the Transformation of 18th-Century Studies (Liverpool UP, 2020) explores how a set of inter-related digital projects are transforming our vision of the Enlightenment. The featured projects are some of the best known, well-funded and longest established research initiatives in the emerging area of ‘di…
 
If you're interested in learning about a playwright who created a body of work that told the story of the Black experience and helped to launch the careers of several famous Black actors and actresses then my August Wilson Black History Short is for you. Show notes and sources are available at http://noirehistoir.com/blog/august-wilson.…
 
If you're interested in learning about an organization that helped Black citizens overcome entrenched voter suppression and intimidation to become the majority of registered voters in their county and establish an independent political party then my Lowndes County Freedom Organization (LCFO) Black History Short is for you. Show notes and sources ar…
 
If you're interested in learning about a writer, poet, and activist who penned “The Color Purple” which spent 25 weeks on the New York Times’ bestseller list and won both the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction then my Alice Walker Black History Short for you. Show notes and sources are available at http://noirehistoi…
 
The Fascination with Death in Contemporary French Thought: A Longing for the Abyss (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020) analyses a cultural phenomenon that goes to the very roots of Western civilization: the centrality of death in our sense of human existence. It does so through a close reading of seminal works by the most creative authors of modern French t…
 
The 1790s were a decade of turmoil and strife across the West. With the French Revolution, a new era of wars began that invoked the language of equal rights. In The Bloody Flag: Mutiny in the Age of Atlantic Revolution (University of California Press, 2020), Niklas Frykman recounts how these two factors combined to shape the mutinies that took plac…
 
Dónal Hassett’s Mobilizing Memory: The Great War and the Language of Politics in Colonial Algeria, 1918-1939 (Oxford UP, 2019) is at once a history of colonialism and of the “Great War”. Considering the ways that the conflict from 1914-1918 shaped the colonial politics of the “interwar” years in the Algerian context, the book looks at how segments …
 
A profile of Stokely Carmichael, an activist and political organizer who participated in the Freedom Rides, launched the Lowndes County Freedom Organization, served as chairman of SNCC, and was the first to express the ideology of Black self-determination as "Black Power." Show notes and sources are available at http://noirehistoir.com/blog/stokely…
 
When Judith G. Coffin discovered a virtually unexplored treasure trove of letters to Simone de Beauvoir from Beauvoir's international readers, it inspired Coffin to explore the intimate bond between the famed author and her reading public. This correspondence, at the heart of Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir (Cornell UP, 2020), im…
 
If you’re interested in learning about apartheid including the circumstances that led to its official creation, the laws that were enacted, the movement that led to its abolition, and its aftermath. Then my "Apartheid in South Africa" Black History Feature is for you. Show notes and sources at http://noirehistoir.com/blog/apartheid-in-south-africa.…
 
Young women and men sought out each other’s company in the workshops, cabarets, and streets of Old Regime Lyon, and evidence of these relationships lingers in documents and material objects conserved in Lyon’s municipal and departmental archives. How did young workers spend time together? When would they initiate sexual relationships outside of mar…
 
Roland Barthes and Film: Myth, Eroticism and Poetics (Bloomsbury) is a book by Patrick Ffrench, Professor of French at Kings College. It is a comprehensively researched and finely argued book that traces Barthes engagement with questions of cinema from early research pre-dating the publication of Mythologies to his last work, Camera Lucida, along t…
 
In her new book, Economistes and the Reinvention of Empire: France in the Americas and Africa, c. 1750-1802 (Cambridge UP, 2020), Dr. Pernille Røge charts the confluence and reciprocal impacts of ideas and policies espoused by political economists, colonial administrators, planters, and entrepreneurs to reform the French empire in the second half o…
 
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