show episodes
 
The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
The Department of Statistics at Oxford is a world leader in research including computational statistics and statistical methodology, applied probability, bioinformatics and mathematical genetics. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Oxford's Mathematical Sciences submission was ranked overall best in the UK. This is an exciting time for the Department. We have now moved into our new home on St Giles and we are currently settling in. The new building provides improved lecture and ...
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law -https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/grad ...
 
In this fun and informative series Dr Lindsay Turnbull, Associate Professor and Fellow of The Queen’s College, Oxford University, looks at the biology of the back garden. This series is recorded hot off the press in a normal garden in England beginning in March 2020 and would be of interest to anyone from age 5+. The series is particularly useful for children missing school who would like to carry on practical work in their own garden and have an expert help them understand the theory behind ...
 
A selection of seminars and special lectures on wide-ranging topics relating to practical ethics. The Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics was established in 2002 with the support of the Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education of Japan. It is an integral part of the philosophy faculty of Oxford University, one of the great centres of academic excellence in philosophical ethics.
 
From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, host Professor Adam Smith talks to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
From a magician who inspired Shakespeare, and poems woven into Japanese prints, to manuscripts illuminated with the ancient love story of Layla and Majnun, this new podcast series will delve into the poetry and literature hidden in the collections at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. Join us each Friday, from 5 February, for a new audio adventure. Objects Out Loud is produced and presented by Lucie Dawkins.
 
Welcome to the Oxford Adult ESL Conversations podcast, hosted by Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, co-author of the Oxford Picture Dictionary and series director of the new Step Forward Second Edition. In this podcast series, Jayme is joined by Adult ESL educators, thought leaders, and advocates for candid conversations about topics important to teachers in this dynamic field.
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law at Oxford website. .
 
The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford is the largest university library system in the United Kingdom. It includes the principal University library - the Bodleian Library - which has been a legal deposit library for 400 years; as well as 28 other libraries across Oxford including major research libraries and faculty, department and institute libraries. Together, the Libraries hold more than 12 million printed items, over 80,000 e-journals and outstanding special collections inclu ...
 
Reimagine is a new and original podcast series from the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford University’s Said Business School, presented by Peter Drobac. In this series we meet the visionaries, the disruptors, the world’s problem-solvers, who are taking up the challenge of fixing the bits of our world that are broken. The people who see things differently, and we need them now more than ever.
 
This podcast series presents recordings of talks given at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of its public programme of events. The Museum of Natural History was founded in 1860, and today it holds an internationally significant collection of natural history specimens and archives. Housed in a stunning neo-Gothic building inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites, the Museum is home to a lively programme of research, teaching and public events.
 
Fantasy Literature has emerged as one of the most important genres over the past few decades and now enjoys extraordinary levels of popularity. The impact of Tolkien’s Middle-earth works and the serialisation of George Martin’s ‘Game of Thrones’ books has moved these and their contemporaries into mainstream culture. As the popularity grows so does interest in the roots of fantasy, the main writers and themes, and how to approach these texts. Oxford is a natural home to fantasy literature wit ...
 
The AWS Podcast is the definitive cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives and interviews. Whether you’re building machine learning and AI models, open source projects, or hybrid cloud solutions, the AWS Podcast has something for you.
 
This two-day conference provided a forum for academics, practitioners and government representatives to evaluate the current debate and future shape of the post-2015 agenda from a human rights perspective. It was focused on both theoretical and practical aspects of integrating human rights in the post-2105 agenda, with a particular focus on poverty, environment and peace and security.
 
A series of 8 lectures on General Philosophy, delivered to first year Oxford University undergraduates in Michaelmas term 2018. The lectures cover six main topics: Knowledge and Scepticism, Induction, Mind and Body, Personal Identity, Free Will, God and Evil. But they set these topics within a much broader context, encompassing humanity’s history of discovery about the natural world (both in physics and biology), and our place within it (linked to issues of both evolution and morality). Main ...
 
Have you ever been lazy and had things just come to you? Whether through fruition, random success, or via a subconscious thought? Well, here we talk about all of it! Join Alan PrepZilla and Justin for weekly banter as we talk about news, politics, and even the occasional pet issue, all while discussing how to go through life lazy (yet successfully)! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lazyyetsuccessful/support
 
In Great.com Talks With... we aim to break down the world’s most pressing problems in a way that is interesting, exciting, and easy to understand. Our podcast hosts, Emil Ekvardt and Spirit Rosenberg, talk with organizations and experts dedicated to doing good in the world. Together, they shed light on some incredible work being done globally.
 
Join our host Oliver Kadel and guest presenters, in conversation with industry thought leaders, practitioners, artists, academics and entrepreneurs discussing all aspects of this rapidly evolving industry from art, science and business to practical insights and project case studies. We aim to inform, educate, explore and unite the community. Immersive Audio Podcast is produced by 1.618 Digital Ltd.
 
Professor of Poetry Alice Oswald gives her lectures on poetry, language, literature, beauty and life every term. The Professor of Poetry lectures were conceived in 1708 by Berkshire landowner Henry Birkhead and began after he bequeathed some money so it could be a valuable supplement to the curriculum. He believed ‘the reading of the ancient poets gave keenness and polish to the minds of young men as well as to the advancement of more serious literature both sacred and human’. The first poet ...
 
Our mission at Better Boards is to contribute to creating better boards. We do this by providing clients with an evidence-based approach for board evaluations and board development programmes. To fulfill our mission, we would like to give a voice to all who are care about creating better boards, Chairpeople, CEOs, SIDs, NEDs, Academicians, investors, and regulators.All the views expressed in our podcasts are the views of our podcast partners and not those of Better Boards. In each episode, y ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
What is Effective Altruism? And what are the internal obstacles blocking people from making effective donations? Dr Stefan Schubert is a researcher from Oxford University at the Social Behaviour and Ethics Lab. In this interview Stefan describes the different obstacles people have that block them from donating effectively. Want to know more about S…
 
Welcome to the Better Boards podcast series. In this episode, Dr Sabine Dembkowski speaks with Professor Karthik Ramanna. Professor Ramanna is Professor of Business & Public Policy and Director of the Master of Public Policy Program at the University of Oxford's Blavatnik School of Government. He recently produced a study for one of the Big 4 Audit…
 
We are delighted to bring you the first instalment in our ‘In conversation with’ series. Over the coming months, our host Teresa Owusu-Adjei, along with members of our Clients and Markets Executive, will speak to our clients about the issues that are front-of-mind for them. You’ll learn how different organisations have responded to the pandemic and…
 
George Orwell once said that “the word ‘fascism’ has now no meaning except in so far as it signifies ‘something not desirable’”. The word ‘neoliberalism’ knows exactly how it feels. How did a term coined by a group of anti-authoritarian German economists in the 1930s to label a philosophy that stressed the role of the state in ensuring efficient co…
 
Professor Joshua D. Silver is a UK physicist whose discoveries have included a new way to change the curvature of lenses, with significant application for the low-cost manufacture of corrective lenses and adjustable spectacles, especially in low-income countries. Silver began his academic career in the Department of Atomic and Laser Physics at the …
 
Sweden has a strong reputation of being a sustainable and environmentally friendly country, yet today only 12% of the forests outside national parks and reserves are over 120 years old. Deforestation Sweden is an initiative which uses visual documentation to raise awareness of the destruction of Sweden’s natural heritage. Find out how you can do mo…
 
https://www.facebook.com/AmericansforIntelligenceReformhttps://twitter.com/AmericansReformhttps://www.youtube.com/c/BradJohnsonAIR/about https://linktr.ee/Addyadds BitChute https://www.bitchute.com/channel/BgElNaoKAoii/BNT Channel: https://brandnewtube.com/@addyaddsUGE Video: https://videos.utahgunexchange.com/@addyaddsBrighteon: https://www.bright…
 
A recent report about Ravi Zacharias has shipwrecked a global ministry and the legacy of one of the most influential Christian apologists has been swept away. Justin and Ruth are joined by Christian psychologist Dr Diane Langberg, a specialist in trauma abuse, and Rev Glen Scrivener, an evangelist with Speak Life, to discuss how we safeguard agains…
 
Professor Seline Trevisanut, Utrecht University, gives a talk for the Public International Law discussion group series. On 27 January 2021, the UN Human Rights Committee ascertained the responsibility of Italy for failing to protect the right to life of more than 200 migrants who were on board a vessel that sank in the Mediterranean Sea in 2013. Th…
 
Shivaike Shah hosts a podcast series with the artists and academics on the team in order to create a dialogue with potential audiences. The podcasts discuss the collaborations on Medea and explores the work of each guest beyond the ‘Medea’ project. Supported by the Humanities Cultural Programme and the Arts Council England…
 
Lizzie Siddall was the 19th century’s proto-supermodel. Her beauty inspired the artists and poets of her generation, who presented her as a mysterious, fairytale creature. We tend to know her through the filter of the men who painted her, but in the archives of the Ashmolean Museum, you can encounter the real Lizzie. Behind the silent muse of Pre-R…
 
Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men, and the second in women. It is also one of the most preventable. Fight Colorectal Cancer wants more of us to have a conversation with our doctor about cancer screening. It’s not as awkward or embarrassing as you think. Find out how your support and advocacy can help create a world …
 
Around 6.5 million cats and dogs end up in animal shelters in the USA each year. Often, owners simply find themselves struggling to live in harmony with their animal. The Animal Welfare Association of New Jersey believes in strengthening the bond between owner and pet through education. Find out how understanding the needs of a pet can leave you fe…
 
After Facebook reached a deal with Australia, the tech giants are coming under fire once again -- this time from each other. Are their cosy monopolies under threat? Also, The Economist’s defence editor investigates the multi-billion dollar industry which exploits vulnerabilities in vital software. And, how whales could help the study of seismology …
 
Why do books and publishing matter to the contemporary history of Britain? In Penguin Books and Political Change: Britain's Meritocratic Moment, 1937–1988 (Manchester UP, 2020), Dean Blackburn, aLecturer in Modern British History at the University of Nottingham, explores Britain in the twentieth century through the story of Penguin’s ‘Specials’. Th…
 
It’s hard to avoid innovation these days. Nearly every product gets marketed as being disruptive, whether it’s genuinely a new invention or just a new toothbrush. But in this manifesto on the state of American work, historians of technology Lee Vinsel and Andrew L. Russell argue that our way of thinking about and pursuing innovation has made us poo…
 
The medium of cinema emerged during the height of Victorian-era European empires, and as a result, settler colonial imperialism has thematically suffused film for well over a century. In Cinematic Settlers: The Settler Colonial World on Film (Routledge, 2020), Drs. Janne Lahti (Academy of Finland Fellow in history, University of Helsinki) and Rebec…
 
What if our crops were reliably high yield, good for the environment and protected the ecosystems they were grown in? The Land Institute researches and develops grains that check all three of these boxes, focusing on long-term sustainability and soil health. Find out how a modern approach to crop cultivation can ensure our farmlands remain fertile …
 
‘The Evangelical Universalist’ was published in 2006. The author claimed to be an evangelical Christian who believes that everyone will ultimately be saved. He published under a pen name, but a few years later revealed his true identity as Robin Parry, then editorial director of UK Christian publisher Paternoster (he’s now at Wipf and Stock Publish…
 
https://linktr.ee/Addyadds BitChute https://www.bitchute.com/channel/BgElNaoKAoii/BNT Channel: https://brandnewtube.com/@addyaddsUGE Video: https://videos.utahgunexchange.com/@addyaddsBrighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/addyadds Parler: https://parler.com/profile/AddyAdds/postsGab: https://gab.com/addyadds GoFundMe - https://www.gf.me/u/x…
 
We are faced with many challenges in the bid to protect our marine environment, but action is required now if we wish to preserve and safeguard our precious waters. Turtle Island Restoration Network is a leading advocate for ocean and marine wildlife. Find out how you can be part of positive change by promoting the protection of endangered species …
 
Professor Monica Hakimi, University of Michigan, gives a talk for the PIL discussion series. When we speak of the rule of law, we generally mean to describe the attributes that make law, as an enterprise, worthwhile--the qualities that lead us to aspire to live in a society governed by law. Though international lawyers commonly invoke the concept, …
 
Imagine being the parent of an HIV positive child and not being able to access medication suitable for children. This has been the case for many countries in Africa. The American Foundation for Children with Aids (AFCA) provides critical services and sustainable livelihood pathways for HIV+ children and their caregivers. Find out how you can join t…
 
Apache Cassandra is a wide-column, open-source database that developers use to store data for internet scale applications that require fast performance. However, managing Apache Cassandra can be complex and expensive. Today, Simon is joined by Arturo Hinojosa, Principal Product Manager for Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra), AWS’s serverless, …
 
In this episode of University Registrars Talking About Stuff it is my enormous pleasure to be talking to Sheena Stewart who is University Secretary at Abertay University in Dundee. Sheena has worked at Abertay for an extraordinary 30 year period but, given what we have been through lately, we mainly look back at the past 12 months and then into the…
 
We all deserve to live independent and stimulating lives, but for many people with vision impairment there are often challenges to overcome in order to experience this fulfillment. The Carroll Center for the Blind helps people establish a sense of who they are, regardless of their blindness. Find out how you can aid their mission to reform the soci…
 
Richmond Wandera, a pastor in Kampala, Uganda and listener of Unbelievable? talks to Justin about the history of Christian revival in Africa, elections and Covid in Uganda, witchcraft, secularism and the problem of the prosperity gospel in churches. He also share his story of coming from the slums of Kampala through to theological education and chu…
 
In this episode of the Immersive Audio Podcast, Oliver Kadel and Bjørn Jacobsen are joined by sound artist and disability advocate - Andy Slater from Chicago, US.Andy Slater is a Chicago based media artist and disability advocate. He is the founder of the Society of Visually Impaired Sound Artists and director of the Sound As Sight accessible field…
 
Is intersectionality a critical social theory? What must intersectionality do to be both critical and a social theory? Must social justice be a guiding normative principle? And what does or should social justice mean in intersectional theory? Patricia Hills Collins explores these questions, and many more, in Intersectionality as Critical Social The…
 
Professor Martin Scheinin, Bonavero Institute of Human Rights, gives a talk for the Public International Law series. On 13 November 2020, the European Court of Human Rights communicated to 33 governments an application by a group of young Portuguese persons who claim that conduct by the respondent States in respect of the phenomenon and human right…
 
In this Direct interview, John is joined by constitutional lawyer Greg Lukianoff, who is also the president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE). He focuses on the First Amendment, constitutional law, and the predicament of free speech on university campuses. In 2015, he wrote a now-famous article with Jonathan Haidt called “…
 
In this episode, Clare Pollard, the Curator of Japanese Art, and researcher Kiyoko Hanaoka introduce us to surimono prints, which combined poems and picture puzzles in beautiful objects designed to be exchanged as gifts by members of Japanese poetry clubs. Join them as they decode the clues in these complex and beautiful prints. The priest Sōjō Hen…
 
One in five cancer patients in the US lose more than 40% of their income during their treatment. Despite this, financial and psycho-social support are often hard to come by. This is where Family Reach steps in. Their mission is to remove financial barriers standing between a cancer patient and their treatment. To do this, they educate both patients…
 
Yomaira C. Figueroa-Vásquez pens towards decolonial freedom. Her recently published book, Decolonizing Diasporas: Radical Mappings of Afro-Atlantic Literature (Northwestern University Press, 2020), uses peripheralized (5) novels, visual/sonic works, poetry, essays, and short stories by diasporic and exiled Afro-Atlantic Hispanophone writers and art…
 
Fifteen years ago in Stockholm, Daniel Ek and Martin Lorentzon had a big idea. The music industry was playing a desperate game of whack-a-mole with piracy via file sharing but this was proving as hopeless as the War on Drugs. Why not, they thought, use the new torrenting technologies to bring piracy in from the cold and make themselves rich in the …
 
Pets have long provided humans with friendship and an empathetic cure for loneliness. Highlighted by the current pandemic, we’re seeing more than ever the importance of pets for the health and wellbeing of people all across the globe. Providing care for animals whose owners cannot afford to pay for medical treatment, NYC's AMC (Animal Medical Centr…
 
Intel is the world’s biggest chipmaker. So why is it underperforming—and can its new boss turn the company around? As the search for life on Mars hots up, astrophysicist Avi Loeb argues science has already detected evidence of intelligent extraterrestrial life. And, why parents of daughters are more likely to divorce than those with sons. Kenneth C…
 
Professor Nehal Bhuta, University of Edinburgh and Dr Rebecca Mignot-Mahdavi, University of Amsterdam, give a talk for the Public International Law seminar series. Philip Alston’s deep worries about the institutionalization of the tactic of targeting killing, the ensuing extension of warfare and its corrosive consequences for any meaningful possibi…
 
Carola Lingaas, VID Specialised University, gives a talk for the Public International Law seminar series. Members of racial groups are protected under international law against genocide, persecution, and apartheid. But what is race – and why was this contentious term not discussed when drafting the Statute of the International Criminal Court? Altho…
 
Access to fresh water, electricity, and owning a mobile phone are all possible due to free market economy, but people do not often discuss these fundamental topics and we find ourselves not questioning the systems that we live within. Students for Liberty are an international network that inspires and educates students who are interested in the ide…
 
Many have suggested that Christian belief in the divinity and worship of Jesus as God was a late development, and that Jesus' early followers did not regard him as being equal with God. So was Jesus merely regarded as an ‘elevated’ being? Was high Christology at odds with the Jewish monotheism of the first century? New Testament scholar Richard Bau…
 
We are joined today by Alison Phipps, Professor in Gender Studies and the University of Sussex to talk about her newest book, Me, Not You: The Trouble with Mainstream Feminism (Manchester University Press, 2020). The Me Too movement, started by Black feminist Tarana Burke in 2006, went viral as a hashtag eleven years later after a tweet by white ac…
 
The State of Florida has been labelled the ‘hate crime capital’ of the United States, with defamation against Muslims at the forefront of this malicious prejudice. Building bridges of understanding and tolerance, CAIR Florida strives to protect all those who suffer from discrimination whilst offering training and education to enact long-term struct…
 
In this podcast episode, I sit down and have a chat with Wendy Wood on habits. Wendy Wood is the Provost Professor of Psychology and Business at University of Southern California, where she has been a faculty member since 2009. Wood completed her bachelor's degree at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign and her Ph.D. at the University of Mass…
 
As right-wing nationalism and authoritarian populism gain momentum across the world, liberals, and even some conservatives, worry that democratic principles are under threat. In The Spectre of Race: How Discrimination Haunts Western Democracy (Princeton UP, 2018), Michael Hanchard argues that the current rise in xenophobia and racist rhetoric is no…
 
In this episode, I interview Cassandra Falke, professor of English Literature ad UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, about her book The Phenomenology of Love and Reading (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2016). In the text, Falke situates herself within the current revival of the interest in ethics in literary criticism, which coincides with a rise in neur…
 
Many people don’t realise that long-term access to clean water presents huge logistical and technical challenges. Water for Good maintains 1800 water pumps in the Central African Republic. They want to make sure that clean water can continue to keep future generations healthy. Find out why it’s important to consider the impact you might have when d…
 
Simon and Nicki cover some really interesting updates.Chapters01:22 AWS Marketplace01:53 Analytics05:57 Application Integration06:40 Block Chain07:09 Business Applications07:51 Compute11:26 Customer Engagement12:12 Databases16:37 Developer Tools17:42 Internet of Things (IoT)19:05 Machine Learning21:59 Management & Governance28:30 Media Services28:5…
 
In the USA, a small group of ultra-wealthy individuals believe that money - not people - should control the government. Their unchecked political influence threatens the democratic principles on which the country was founded. MapLight researches and exposes the dangerous influence of corporate money on US politics. Find out about the solutions that…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login