show episodes
 
A selection of seminars and special lectures on wide-ranging topics relating to practical ethics. The Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics was established in 2002 with the support of the Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education of Japan. It is an integral part of the philosophy faculty of Oxford University, one of the great centres of academic excellence in philosophical ethics.
 
The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
Welcome to the Oxford Adult ESL Conversations podcast, hosted by Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, co-author of the Oxford Picture Dictionary and series director of the new Step Forward Second Edition. In this podcast series, Jayme is joined by Adult ESL educators, thought leaders, and advocates for candid conversations about topics important to teachers in this dynamic field.
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law -https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/grad ...
 
From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, host Professor Adam Smith talks to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
Fantasy Literature has emerged as one of the most important genres over the past few decades and now enjoys extraordinary levels of popularity. The impact of Tolkien’s Middle-earth works and the serialisation of George Martin’s ‘Game of Thrones’ books has moved these and their contemporaries into mainstream culture. As the popularity grows so does interest in the roots of fantasy, the main writers and themes, and how to approach these texts. Oxford is a natural home to fantasy literature wit ...
 
The Africa Oxford Initiative (AfOx) is a cross-university platform for all things Africa in Oxford. The overarching vision of AfOx is to make Africa a strategic priority for the University of Oxford, while also building equitable research collaborations between researchers and academics from African institutions and the University of Oxford. Throughout the year AfOx hosts several events and workshops about Africa-focussed research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. T ...
 
A one day conference showcasing the wide variety of research and projects being undertaken by Academics under the Humanities Division at the University of Oxford. From Philosophy and Neuroscience to Politics and International Relations to Literary Analysis and the History of Ideas, Oxford's Humanities Division crosses departments and subjects in its research goals.
 
Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR) is an inter-disciplinary network of more than 100 Oxford staff and students working broadly on issues of transition in societies recovering from mass conflict and/or repressive rule. OTJR is dedicated to producing high-quality scholarship that connects intimately to practical and policy questions in transitional justice, focusing on the following themes: Prosecutions, Truth Commissions, Local and traditional practices, Compensation and reparations, ...
 
The inaugural Oxford-India Day took place on 17 June 2011. The event aimed to celebrate the longstanding and varied links between the University and India, and to reinvigorate and strengthen those links. Over 80 external guests, representing Indian business, Indian government, UK government, Indian civil society, journalism, law and academia came to Oxford, exploring cutting-edge collaborative research; the students and staff who have come to Oxford from India; and the outstanding collection ...
 
The Global Thinkers Project, Oxford was launched in 2017 with the aim of reviving silenced voices in the discipline of International Relations (IR). It explores the internationalist thought of individuals who have made significant contributions in international affairs but have been excluded from the discipline due to biases of language, region, and gender. By encouraging IR to 'rethink its thinkers', our project responds to a call for a more inclusive, diverse, and ‘Global IR’, making Oxfor ...
 
The Department of Physics public lecture series. An exciting series of lectures about the research at Oxford Physics take place throughout the academic year. Looking at topics diverse as the creation of the universe to the science of climate change. Features episodes previously published as: (1) 'Oxford Physics Alumni': "Informal interviews with physics alumni at events, lectures and other alumni related activities." (2) 'Physics and Philosophy: Arguments, Experiments and a Few Things in Bet ...
 
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Immunology

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Immunology

Oxford University

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Immunology is the study of the body's defence mechanisms, from the barrier of skin to the workings of the cellular immune system. Our Immunology podcasts describe the work of NDM researchers to understand the molecular processes of the immune system, and its role in infection, inflammation, and disease.
 
In this fun and informative series Dr Lindsay Turnbull, Associate Professor and Fellow of The Queen’s College, Oxford University, looks at the biology of the back garden. This series is recorded hot off the press in a normal garden in England beginning in March 2020 and would be of interest to anyone from age 5+. The series is particularly useful for children missing school who would like to carry on practical work in their own garden and have an expert help them understand the theory behind ...
 
These oral history interviews, conducted by Georgina Ferry, capture the stories of pioneering women at the forefront of research, teaching and service provision for computing in Oxford, 1950s-1990s. Themes throughout the interviews include career opportunities, gender splits in computing, the origins and development of computing teaching and research in Oxford, as well as development of the University of Oxford's Computing Service and the commercial software house the Numerical Algorithms Gr ...
 
Every year more than 10 million children under the age of five die in developing countries, nearly a million from malaria alone. Every day more than 2500 people die of malaria, most of them children. These are the statistics that help drive the tenacious work of Oxford researchers in tropical medicine. The genesis of Oxford’s involvement goes back to a conversation over a bottle of whiskey, between David Weatherall and Peter Williams, the then Director of the Wellcome Trust, in New York in 1 ...
 
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Open Science

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Open Science

Oxford University

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In this series of podcasts we consider the impact of opening up science: allowing both the research community and the public to freely access the results of scientific work. Individuals can be fully informed about medical or environmental research, students worldwide can get access to the latest work, and software agents can roam the vast scientific knowledge base seeking patterns and correlations that no human has observed. Ultimately, it may profoundly change the way science is done. The r ...
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law at Oxford website. .
 
The University of Oxford is one of the world's leading centres for the study of Africa. In every Faculty and Division across the University there are active research programmes focused on the continent. The African Studies Centre, within the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, acts as a focal point for graduate level work and faculty research on Africa. Alongside the vibrant doctoral programmes, the MSc in African Studies, inaugurated in 2006, is already recognised as Europe's most pre ...
 
Welcome to Chemistry at Oxford! Our M. Chem. topped the subject ranking for Chemistry in the Guardian's University Guide 2014, and no other university can match the simultaneous breadth and depth of the Oxford Chemistry experience. You'll study a four-year course, and spend your final year working full-time on a project with some of the leading researchers in the UK. Fundamental science and blue skies thinking are celebrated here, but so is commercialisation - maybe your work will help launc ...
 
The Oxford Food Governance Group is an interdisciplinary group of researchers from the Institute for Science, Innovation and Society (InSIS), Said Business School, and the Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) at the University of Oxford, who share an interest in food governance practices. Looking at the politics of food distribution, sustainability, and governance of the food supply among other topics, this series will look at how we get our food and why it matters.
 
Vaccines save millions of lives each year; however, some of the world's worst diseases are still difficult to prevent. Our series of podcasts on Epidemics and Vaccines detail the research within NDM to combat diseases such as hepatitis, influenza and tuberculosis, through development of novel vaccines and vaccine delivery mechanisms and strategies. Developing countries and vulnerable populations are a particular focus of some of this work.
 
Translational and Clinical Medicine is the ongoing effort to bring basic science from the bench to the patient, as well as to elucidate safety and effectiveness of the medicines on which we depend. The NDM podcasts on translational and clinical medicine detail our work in this wide-ranging field, from the identification and design of new medicines to clinical trials and trial design and regulation.
 
The Department of Statistics at Oxford is a world leader in research including computational statistics and statistical methodology, applied probability, bioinformatics and mathematical genetics. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Oxford's Mathematical Sciences submission was ranked overall best in the UK. This is an exciting time for the Department. We have now moved into our new home on St Giles and we are currently settling in. The new building provides improved lecture and ...
 
The study of populations and demographics is explained in detail in this introductory series by Professor David Coleman, Professor of Demography. Using statistics gathered from censuses, parish records and other sources, Professor Coleman looks at the ways in which populations rise and fall through history. This series is at an introductory level and individuals need no prior knowledge of analyzing statistics or mathematics.
 
The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford is the largest university library system in the United Kingdom. It includes the principal University library - the Bodleian Library - which has been a legal deposit library for 400 years; as well as 28 other libraries across Oxford including major research libraries and faculty, department and institute libraries. Together, the Libraries hold more than 12 million printed items, over 80,000 e-journals and outstanding special collections inclu ...
 
This podcast series presents recordings of talks given at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of its public programme of events. The Museum of Natural History was founded in 1860, and today it holds an internationally significant collection of natural history specimens and archives. Housed in a stunning neo-Gothic building inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites, the Museum is home to a lively programme of research, teaching and public events.
 
A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. Taking a chronological view of the history of philosophy, each lecture is split into 3 or 4 sections which outlin ...
 
What do medicine and translation have in common? In what sense, and to what extent, is translation used in contexts as different as the transfer of meaning from one language (or medium) to the other, the concept of knowledge translation, and the process of protein synthesis? How will a nuanced understanding of translation help us live a healthier, happier and longer life? In this newly-launched seminar series, we will explore these questions in an interdisciplinary way, with the aim to endor ...
 
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Reimagine

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Reimagine

Saïd Business School

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Reimagine is a new and original podcast series from the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford University’s Said Business School, presented by Peter Drobac. In this series we meet the visionaries, the disruptors, the world’s problem-solvers, who are taking up the challenge of fixing the bits of our world that are broken. The people who see things differently, and we need them now more than ever.
 
This two-day conference provided a forum for academics, practitioners and government representatives to evaluate the current debate and future shape of the post-2015 agenda from a human rights perspective. It was focused on both theoretical and practical aspects of integrating human rights in the post-2105 agenda, with a particular focus on poverty, environment and peace and security.
 
A series of 8 lectures on General Philosophy, delivered to first year Oxford University undergraduates in Michaelmas term 2018. The lectures cover six main topics: Knowledge and Scepticism, Induction, Mind and Body, Personal Identity, Free Will, God and Evil. But they set these topics within a much broader context, encompassing humanity’s history of discovery about the natural world (both in physics and biology), and our place within it (linked to issues of both evolution and morality). Main ...
 
From a magician who inspired Shakespeare, and poems woven into Japanese prints, to manuscripts illuminated with the ancient love story of Layla and Majnun, this new podcast series will delve into the poetry and literature hidden in the collections at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. Join us each Friday, from 5 February, for a new audio adventure. Objects Out Loud is produced and presented by Lucie Dawkins.
 
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The effects of COVID-19 reach far beyond mortality, triggering widespread economic and sociopolitical consequences. It is unsurprising to learn, after everything that has transpired in the past two years, that COVID-19 has also had a detrimental effect on our mental health. Recent studies in the US and UK have shown a huge increase in the number of…
 
From the 1980s until quite recently, the mood music of American politics was to “roll back” the public programmes created during Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. Now, taxes and spending are rising and the New Deal – maybe in the guise of the “Green New Deal” – is cool again. Maybe government is seen, once again, as the solution to our problems rather…
 
In this St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Dr Sarah Chan outlines some risks arising from the deliberate infection of human participants to infectious agents for research purposes In this St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Dr Sarah Chan explores three key areas of risk in ‘challenge trials’ – the deliberate infection of human participants to infectious…
 
Marcello Ienca discusses moral and legal issues surrounding the decoding – ‘mind reading’ - of brain activity In the 1990s, following rapid advances in the use of technologies such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), an ethical debate arose around the concept of 'mind reading': the possibility of decoding a person's mental states (incl…
 
The American Civil War did not end ambiguously – it ended in complete military defeat for the South. And yet for a century and a half, it is the losers – the men who took up arms against the United States to defend the cause of human enslavement – were honoured as American heroes. None more so than Robert E. Lee. Now the immense statue of Lee that …
 
In this episode, Susan Mizruchi introduces American author Henry James, who created a unique body of fiction that includes Daisy Miller, The Portrait of a Lady, and The Turn of the Screw. Learn more about “Henry James: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/henry-james-a-very-short-introduction-9780190944384 Susan …
 
Laura Henry-Allain In this episode of Diversifying Reading with Shareen Wilkinson, Shareen talks to Laura Henry-Allain MBE about the Lit in Colour research and diversifying children’s publishing, why we need to talk to children about race in school and at home, and how to be anti-racist. Laura Henry-Allain MBE is an award-winning international writ…
 
In this episode of our podcast, we explore how well women's voices are represented in the Ghanaian news media compared to those of men, based on a research project led by a prominent broadcaster and former Journalist Fellow at the Reuters Institute. We look at the reasons behind the unequal representation and treatment of female and male experts an…
 
The shocking attacks of September 11, 2001, were one of those "wake up" moments for the US, raising troubling questions about the nation's place in the world, how it could defend itself and what kind of a country it wanted to be. Looking back with Adam at how 9/11 changed America are Prof Nazita Lajevardi (Michigan State and Oxford), an expert in t…
 
In this episode, Andrew Copson introduces secularism, an increasingly hot topic in public, political, and religious debate across the globe that is more complex than simply ‘state versus religion.’ Learn more about “Secularism: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/secularism-a-very-short-introduction-978019874722…
 
In this episode, Jayme is joined by Rebecca Barker, Programs Officer at the Oklahoma Department of Libraries. They discuss how library and community literacy programs are continuing to pivot to meet the changing needs of their communities and learners. This … Continue reading →By Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
 
At the close of the First World War, the U.S. Government gave the American people a choice unlike that of any other nation: to leave their dead loved ones where they fell, or repatriate them to the US for burial at home. Of the 116 000 dead, over 45 000 families made the choice to bring their dead home. In this episode, RAI Fellow Dr. Alice Kelly s…
 
Daniel Fenwick In this episode of Diversifying Reading with Shareen Wilkinson, Shareen talks to Deputy Headteacher Daniel Fenwick about his involvement with Penguin and The Runnymede Trust’s Lit in Colour initiative and the steps that his school have taken to teach a wider range of texts. Daniel Fenwick is the Deputy Head and English Coordinator at…
 
In this episode, Sarah Harper introduces demography, the study of people, which addresses the size, distribution, composition, and density of populations, and considers the impact certain factors will have on both individual lives and the changing structure of human populations. Learn more about “Demography: A Very Short Introduction” here: https:/…
 
Why does Joe Biden often refer to his mother's Irish ancestry but not his father's English roots? Why does being "Irish" in America have such cachet? In this episode, Adam talks to Professors Kevin Kenny of New York University and David Gleeson from Northumbria University to explore the complex history of Irishness in American culture. From the "wi…
 
In this episode, Essi Viding introduces psychopathy, a personality disorder that has long captured the public imagination. Despite the public fascination with psychopathy, there is often a very limited understanding of the condition, and several myths about psychopathy abound. Learn more about “Psychopathy: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://…
 
Open research means faster, more equitable access to cutting edge findings, driving disciplines forward, and introducing transparency into the research process. As the world’s largest university press publisher of open access content, Oxford University Press believes a more open world should work for everyone. Over the past few years, the movement …
 
Professor Paul Gragl, European Law at the University of Graz, Austria, gives a talk for the Public International Law seminar series. Abstract: Despite the overwhelming scientific evidence that vaccines are, in general, safe and effective, vaccine hesitancy continues to thrive due to various reasons, such as misinformation, the wish to protect one’s…
 
Julia Emtseva, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg, Germany, gives a talk for the Public International Law seminar series. Julia Emtseva is a research fellow and a PhD candidate at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg, Germany. Julia obtained her LL.M. in…
 
In this episode of our podcast we look at what makes a successful collaboration across international organisations and teams. Speakers:Joshua Ogawa is General Manager, Nikkei-FT Partnership at Nikkei Europe. He is in charge of day-to-day collaboration between Nikkei and the Financial Times, which the Japanese news organisation acquired in 2015. He …
 
In this first episode of Diversifying Reading with Shareen Wilkinson, Shareen talks to Darren Chetty about his involvement with Penguin and The Runnymede Trust’s Lit in Colour initiative. They talk about why it’s important for all children to have access to a representative range of books, as well as ideas to support parents. Darren Chetty is a Lec…
 
In this episode, Kirsten Shepherd-Barr introduce modern drama, the tale of which is a story of extremes, testing both audiences and actors to their limits through hostility and contrarianism. Learn more about “Modern Drama: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/modern-drama-a-very-short-introduction-9780199658770 …
 
In this episode, Jonathon Green introduces slang. Slang has been recorded since at least 1500 AD, and today’s vocabulary, taken from every major English-speaking country, runs to over 125,000 slang words and phrases. Please note that this episode contains a few instances of explicit language. Listener discretion is advised. Learn more about “Slang:…
 
What's the role of opinion writing within journalism, including the place of opinion journalism, specifically in the news media, in a world where many of us have many ways of expressing our opinions and reading other’s opinions, including on social media? Host: Rasmus Nielsen https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/people/prof-rasmus-kleis-niels…
 
Penny Rabiger In this episode of series 2 of Word Up, Helen Prince chats to Penny Rabiger about the importance of listening to young people and what we can learn from them about race, identity and social justice. Penny Rabiger was a teacher for 10 years and has been working with social enterprises, charities and start-ups in the education sector si…
 
In this episode, Vlad Glăveanu introduces creativity, a term that emerged in the 19th century but only became popular around the mid-20th century despite creative expression existing for thousands of years. Learn more about “Creativity: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/creativity-a-very-short-introduction-978…
 
Nathan Burns In this episode of series 2 of Word Up, Helen Prince chats to Nathan Burns about his specialist subject, metacognition. Nathan explains the importance of embedding metacognition into day-to-day teaching, why modelling and monitoring are key approaches in the classroom, and the value metacognition plays in all areas of life, from poachi…
 
Dr Caroline Batten and Dr Megan Cavell discuss fantastic animals in fantasy text Dr Caroline Batten and Dr Megan Cavell discuss fantastic animals in fantasy texts, from their classical origins to the modern day. Topics include medieval bestiaries, The Last Unicorn, dragons and their mothers, Donkey's romantic arc in Shrek, the queerness of Ursula t…
 
In this episode of AJCN In Press, AJCN’s Inaugural Dennis M. Bier Young Career Editor, Kevin C. Klatt, PhD, RD chats with Georgia D. Tomova, MSc and PhD candidate, and Peter WG Tennant, PhD, at the Leads Institute for Data Analytics and the Alan Turing Institute for Data Science and Artificial Intelligence. Ms. Tomova and Dr. Tennant are co-leaders…
 
What do you think of when you hear the term “public debt?” If you’re familiar with the phrase, you might think about elected officials debating budgets and how to pay for goods and services. Or maybe it’s a vague concept you don’t fully understand. For today’s episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with In Defense of Public Debt co-author Barry Ei…
 
In this episode of our Future of Journalism podcast, we look at the news media's role in covering the climate crisis. We look at how newsrooms could be better structured to allow climate reporting to flourish, how to ensure climate reporting is not siloed, and the external challenges that climate reporters and journalism face in the form of disinfo…
 
Louise Pennington In this episode of Oxford Ed Chat, we welcome Louise Pennington and Adam Gaskell to chat about supporting secondary transition in maths. Louise and Adam discuss removing barriers to maths learning, the benefits of using manipulatives and the meaning of mastery. Louise Pennington is Professional Development lead for Oxford Universi…
 
Kat Howard In this episode of series 2 of Word Up, Helen Prince chats to Kat Howard about curriculum implementation and how an exciting curriculum fires up and motivates learners. She also discusses fidelity to the subject, how to capitalise on colleagues’ interests and passions to enrich knowledge and extend the curriculum, and the importance of a…
 
In episode 37 of the OFID podcast, OFID Editor in Chief Paul Sax, MD, and Jeanne Marrazzo, MD, professor of medicine and director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, square off in a spirited draft of the top animal-related infections.By Oxford University Press
 
Keynote lecture in the Diversity and the British String Quartet Symposium, day 3, held on 16th June 2021. Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. Chair: Dr Nina WhitemanSpeaker: Dr Des Oliver On our final day, we begin with a keynote lecture from composer …
 
Keynote lecture in the Diversity and the British String Quartet Symposium, held on 14th June 2021. Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. Lecture by Professor Laura Tunbridge (University of Oxford)Chair: Dr Wiebke Thormählen (Royal College of Music)We wil…
 
Dr Caroline Batten chats with author Katherine Langrish about her book 'From Spare Oom to War Drobe' Dr Caroline Batten chats with author Katherine Langrish about her book 'From Spare Oom to War Drobe: Travels in Narnia with My Nine-Year-Old Self'. Topics include Plato, medieval romance, racism in fantasy, the importance of fanfiction, the problem …
 
We’re all familiar with the phrase “words have power”—but in a political and cultural climate where we become more aware of the power that money, influence, and privilege have every day—how do people wield the power of words? On this episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with philosopher Myisha Cherry and poet Carmen Bugan to talk about how they …
 
Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. In his autobiography, The Life and Rhymes of Benjamin Zephaniah (2018), award-winning poet, lyricist, musician, and activist Benjamin Zephaniah speaks out candidly about the writer’s responsibility to step outside th…
 
In this online event, Ana Paula Cordeiro, the creator of Body of Evidence, speaks from the workshop in New York City where she produced it. She will be joined in conversation by Merve Emre, Associate Professor of American Literature. Body of Evidence (2020) is an artist's book that examines the role of documentary evidence in defining national and …
 
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