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This eleven-part podcast series, a companion to PBS' Valentine's Day television special, The Hidden Epidemic: Heart Disease In America, features best-selling author, Dr. Michael F. Roizen, M.D. and Larry King of CNN's Larry King Live and the Larry King Cardiac Foundation, along with Julie Bain, Health Director at Reader's Digest magazine. In conversation with Julie Bain, Dr. Roizen explains ten different, easy steps you can take to a healthier heart. In the eleventh podcast, Larry King tells ...
 
Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. ...
 
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Ukraine's leaders on Monday tried to reassure the country, despite more than 100,000 Russian troops deployed near the nation's northern and eastern borders, and despite new announcements of Russian training exercises. The West considers an invasion as possibly imminent, and that fear is being felt on Ukraine's frontlines. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS…
 
In our news wrap Tuesday, Pfizer began a clinical trial of an updated COVID-19 vaccine designed to ward off the highly contagious omicron variant. The International Monetary Fund slashed its growth forecast citing the omicron variant and other factors. London's Metropolitan Police Service will investigate gatherings held at Prime Minister Boris Joh…
 
Ukraine's leaders on Monday tried to reassure the country, despite more than 100,000 Russian troops deployed near the nation's northern and eastern borders. Nick Schifrin speaks to Oksana Markarova, Ukraine's ambassador to the United States, about the country's tensions with Russia and intelligence on possible invasion. PBS NewsHour is supported by…
 
All across the country, states are busy at work redrawing congressional lines that will help determine the balance of power in Washington for the next decade. To check in on the status of this reapportionment in some key states based on the new 2020 census data, Judy Woodruff is joined by David Wasserman of The Cook Political Report. PBS NewsHour i…
 
Since the Taliban took over control of Afghanistan last year, the future of the country's women has been in peril. Many girls are barred from receiving an education, and women are prevented from holding many jobs. Back in 2019, special correspondent Jane Ferguson met with a female doctor in Kabul, and she recently returned to find that same doctor …
 
The highly contagious omicron variant has brought new daily COVID-19 case numbers to record highs this month. The magnitude of infections have again left many hospitals under tremendous pressure and on the brink. In Texas, where just 58 percent of the state is fully vaccinated, hospitalizations have risen dramatically -- by 80 percent in some citie…
 
As the impact of climate change grows, so does the risk of ever larger and more frequent wildfires. No state knows that better than California. But the Golden State is also grappling with the role of one of the country's largest utilities in the matter, and whether the company will do what's needed to prevent or stop fires. Stephanie Sy explores. P…
 
As students across the country continue to experience the many changes the pandemic has brought, some are struggling to adjust to their "new normal." As a part of NewsHour's Student Reporting Labs, student reporter Teri Bell followed up with school counselor Edith Porter at Caesar Rodney High School in Camden, Delaware, on her predictions for stude…
 
It's the most acute crisis between the West and Russia since the end of the Cold War, and both sides escalated their military deployments Monday. The United States is putting troops on higher alert, NATO says it will reinforce its eastern flank, and Russia is adding to its existing 100,000 troops on Ukraine's borders. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS New…
 
In our news wrap Monday, the United States Supreme Court rejected a Republican lawsuit against proxy voting in the House of Representatives, but agreed to hear challenges to affirmative action in college admissions for the first time since 2016. Federal prosecutors in Minneapolis charged that three former police officers violated George Floyd's civ…
 
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization is increasing its troop presence in Eastern Europe, and the United States announced Monday it was putting 8,500 troops on high alert to deploy to the region. Judy Woodruff discusses the details of the latest developments with two experts. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funder…
 
At one point Monday, the Dow Jones was down more than a thousand points and the S&P 500, which is a wider gauge of the stock market, fell into correction territory -- a drop of 10 percent from its previous high. All of the major indexes finished on a positive note, but are down since the start of the year. Amna Nawaz discusses with economist Dana P…
 
NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report with Amy Walter join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including the censure of Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, the president's hot mic moment from a White House presser, and voter confidence in the Biden administration. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/…
 
As COVID-19 rages this winter, the Miami City Ballet continues to dance, preparing to perform "Swan Lake" in February, under the careful eye of celebrated choreographer Alexei Ratmansky. Jeffrey Brown spent a day with Ratmansky and dancers to see how they've brought this traditional ballet going back to its rediscovered historical roots. This repor…
 
The past two years of this pandemic have been especially difficult for students, who have experienced major disruptions to both their education and social lives. In a special program that premieres Tuesday, NewsHour's Student Reporting Labs team is exploring how many young people are dealing with the new normal. Here's a look at how one teacher has…
 
Originally from Mexico City herself, Gaby Hernandez understands firsthand the challenges immigrants can face in the United States. As the executive director of the Long Beach Immigrants Rights Coalition in California, she empowers those in her community to push for better resources and protections at both the local and national level. She shares he…
 
Since his earliest days on the mic, DMC, the co-founder of what many consider to be the greatest rap group of all time, has offered countless rhymes and tales--about what it was to be a kid from Queens who wore big glasses, loved reading books, and learned above all else, the importance and power of being yourself. So for Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels, wr…
 
Before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, about 200,000 rode the train through the tunnel under the Hudson river between New York and New Jersey every day. The tunnel, built in 1910, is over 111 years old--and due to lingering damage from Superstorm Sandy, is getting more unstable each day. The project had been in a holding pattern, but now, with the passi…
 
It's been three years since opposition leader Juan Guaido's party won Venezuela's presidential election. But despite international support for Guaido, President Nicolas Maduro continues to lead. With confidence in the democratic process waning, Venezuela is also undergoing a shrinking economy and a growing humanitarian and refugee crisis. Cynthia A…
 
Two years since the first lockdown in China, there have been great strides to combat COVID-19, but confusion and questions remain. From vaccinations to testing, to masking and how many days to isolate--there hasn't always been clarity. More collaboration between the CDC and the FDA would help, says Joshua Sharfstein, professor at the Bloomberg Scho…
 
In order to expand testing access and help stop the spread of the omicron variant, the Biden administration announced this week that it would begin distributing millions of COVID-19 tests and masks to Americans for free. Infectious disease epidemiologist Jessica Malaty Rivera joins for more on the rollout of this plan and its potential impact, the …
 
Mississippi is the only state in the nation without a law requiring equal pay for women--but that could be about to change. Ivette Feliciano sits down with Cassandra Welchlin, Executive Director of the Mississippi Black Women's Roundtable, to discuss her team's push for equal-pay legislation, and the current status of Mississippi's equal pay bill. …
 
President Biden marked his first year in office on a downbeat note: low approval ratings, a defeat of the Democrats' voting rights bill in the Senate, and the Build Back Better Bill stalled. But perhaps Biden's biggest political concern is how he fares within his own party. For a look at why this is crucial, along with some historical context, Spec…
 
In our news wrap Friday, a federal judge in Texas blocked nationwide enforcement of a COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal workers. Anti-abortion groups held their annual rally in Washington, D.C., buoyed by hopes of an abortion rights rollback. Rebels in Yemen say a Saudi coalition airstrike killed at least 70 inmates at a prison. Rock star Meat L…
 
The United States on Friday agreed to submit written responses next week to Russia's demands over how to end the crisis over Ukraine. The announcement came during a high level diplomatic meeting in Geneva, as Russia maintains overwhelming force along the Ukrainian border, and has now deployed to neighboring Belarus. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsH…
 
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