show episodes
 
Emergence Magazine is an online publication with annual print edition exploring the threads connecting ecology, culture, and spirituality. As we experience the desecration of our lands and waters, the extinguishing of species, and a loss of sacred connection to the Earth, we look to emerging stories. Our podcast features exclusive interviews, narrated essays, stories and more. During this pandemic, we are publishing new content that explores the deeper themes and questions emerging at this t ...
 
Cosmopod is the official podcast of Cosmonaut Magazine, a project dedicated to expanding the project of scientific socialism in the 21st Century. In our feed we have a combination of podcast episodes and audio articles from our website.
 
Welcome to Real Science Radio with co-hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams who discuss the latest in science to debunk evolution and to show the evidence for the creator God including from biology, geology, astronomy, and physics. (For example, mutations will give you bad legs long before you'd get good wings.) Not only do we get to debate Darwinists and atheists like Lawrence Krauss, AronRa, and Eugenie Scott, and easily take potshots from popular evolutionists like PZ Myers, Phil Plait, and ...
 
The Undark Podcast continues our mission of illuminating the places where science intersects — and sometimes collides — with our everyday lives, in the form of audio documentaries released monthly from September to May. Scientific questions and challenges, after all, are woven deeply into our politics, our economics, our culture — and they are animated by a wide spectrum of competing values and interests. Our goal is to present rich, narrative-driven audio stories of science as it manifests ...
 
Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace.
 
Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.
 
The Peabody Award-winning On the Media podcast is your guide to examining how the media sausage is made. Hosts Brooke Gladstone and Bob Garfield examine threats to free speech and government transparency, cast a skeptical eye on media coverage of the week’s big stories and unravel hidden political narratives in everything we read, watch and hear. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the ...
 
Editors in Conversation is the official podcast of the American Society for Microbiology Journals. Editors in Conversation features discussions between ASM Journals Editors, researchers and clinicians working on the most cutting edge issues in the microbial sciences. Topics include laboratory diagnosis and clinical treatment of infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, epidemiology of infections, multidrug-resistant organisms, pharmacology of antimicrobial agents, susceptibility testing ...
 
Topics on the science of psychotherapy and psychology hosted by the editors of The Science of Psychotherapy magazine. This podcast covers the neuroscience, neurobiology, biology, sociology, brain science, and even the quantum and metaphysical elements that affect our mental well being and how understanding these elements informs the psychotherapist and psychologist.
 
Edited by bestselling anthologist John Joseph Adams, LIGHTSPEED is a Hugo Award-winning, critically-acclaimed digital magazine. In its pages, you'll find science fiction from near-future stories and sociological SF to far-future, star-spanning SF. Plus there's fantasy from epic sword-and-sorcery and contemporary urban tales to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folk tales. Each month, LIGHTSPEED brings you a mix of originals and reprints featuring a variety of authors, from the bestseller ...
 
"A magazine dedicated to art and design explorations into science and technology" CLOT Magazine is an online publishing and curational platform dedicated to art and science explorations. We aim to collect, display, broadcast and promote the crossover of Art, Science and Technology.
 
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN) has retained its position as the premier biotech publication since its launch in 1981. GEN publishes a print edition monthly and has additional exclusive editorial content online, including news and analysis as well as webinars, videos, and polls. GEN's unique news and technology focus covers the entire bioproduct life cycle, including drug discovery, early-stage R&D, applied research (e.g., omics, biomarkers, and diagnostics), bioprocessing, an ...
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine. His column, "Antigravity," is one of science writing's great humor venues. Also check our daily podcast from Scientific American : "60-Second Science." To view all of our archived ...
 
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show series
 
Many schools closed in the spring, during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic. Many opened in the fall. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about what was learned in spring about how coronavirus spreads in schools that might help keep children safe as cases surge once again.Also this week: What makes leaves f…
 
These days, about half of the protein the world’s population eats is from seafood. Staff Writer Erik Stokstad joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how brand-new biotech and old-fashioned breeding programs are helping keep up with demand, by expanding where we can farm fish and how fast we can grow them.Sarah also spoke with Jan Claesen, an assista…
 
It is not the dust that brings her tears. The Lachrymist’s house is dusty, fragments of time and memory fallen everywhere, a living blanket that drapes itself over tables and chairs and things even stranger. But time and memory are to be expected anywhere the dead gather, and even in this abundance, they do not drive her to weeping. Neither is her …
 
The guys review the current issue of their favorite creation periodical, Creation Magazine. CMI reports on even more scientific discoveries that RSR can add to our already brimming List of Discoveries that Squeeze Evolution. Seaweed fossils in strata dated 200 million years before seaweed evolved. And strata dated to 500MYA has yielded still-biolog…
 
Vaccine scientist Katrina Pollock answers some of the biggest questions about covid-19 vaccines: when are we going to get one, and when will life go back to normal? A clinician at Imperial College London, Katrina is working on both the Imperial mRNA vaccine trials, and the AstraZeneca-Oxford vaccine trials. She discusses vaccine safety, and the fin…
 
The actress Amy Adams is one of Hollywood’s brightest stars with multiple Oscar nominations and a roster of unforgettable roles to her name from the adorable pregnant teenager in Junebug, to the loveable Disney Princess in Enchanted, to full on 1970s disco in American Hustle. Now she’s taken on the distinctly unglamorous role of a drug addicted mot…
 
Krystle Buntemeyer, president of SCORR Marketing, and Bharat Mehta, co-founder of PharmaCompass, discuss a new, free online tool called Pipeline Prospector, which they recently launched in collaboration. The tool aims to provide pharma executives with industry data, including deal and pipeline information, to help them make more informed decisions.…
 
From debates about colonialism to lessons from previous pandemics, a panel of historians discuss how the past has shaped 2020 – and how the events of this momentous year should change our understanding of the past From debates about colonialism to lessons from previous pandemics, history has repeatedly made the headlines this year. We invited histo…
 
Roy Williams joins Samira Ahmed to talk about Death of England: Delroy. Just before Lockdown 2, this play’s opening night became its closing night. The understudy Michael Balogun had just stepped into the role. Luckily the press and audience loved it, and the film of that performance will be available on the National Theatre’s youtube channel this …
 
All eyes are on Georgia now, as the campaigns for both senate seats are underway to determine which party will control the US Senate. For Democrats, the starting point for winning in Georgia is the historic work of Stacey Abrams. When she ran for governor of Georgia in 2018 as the first African American and the first woman candidate, she got more v…
 
Heating deltamethrin may help it kill pesticide-resistant mosquitoes The insecticide is used to control pests that spread life-threatening diseases like malaria A new, more potent form of the common insecticide deltamethrin could be better at killing malaria-transmitting Anopheles mosquitoes (one pictured in this colored scanning electron micrograp…
 
NASA's OSIRIS-REx survived its risky mission to grab a piece of an asteroid If all goes well, the NASA spacecraft will return the samples from Bennu to Earth in 2023 This artist's illustration shows the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft reaching out toward asteroid Bennu as it prepares to grab a sample of the space rock's dust…
 
How octopuses 'taste' things by touching Unique nerve cells found in the animal's suckers can detect prey's defense chemicals A California two-spot octopus ( Octopus bimaculoides ) rests in a coffee mug in a Harvard University lab.
 
We still don't know what COVID-19 immunity means or how long it lasts It's unclear whether we could ever reach herd immunity without a vaccine or a high death toll With questions remaining over how long immunity lasts, such protections as wearing masks like these people lined up to go to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City in August may…
 
Why bat scientists are socially distancing from their subjects Biologist Winifred Frick argues for precautions to shield North American bats from the coronavirus Scientists are keeping their distance from North American bats, such as Indiana bats ( Myotis sodalis ), to avoid spreading the coronavirus to the animals.…
 
Large-scale changes in Earth's climate may originate in the Pacific Long ago, 'catastrophic' purge of North America's western ice sheet may have kicked off losses to the east The Bay of Alaska (Prince William Sound with the Blackstone glacier in the background seen here) holds clues to past climate change.…
 
Bat-winged dinosaurs were clumsy fliers Yi and Ambopteryx were a dead end on the evolutionary road to bird flight Even though it had batlike wings, Ambopteryx longibrachium (illustrated) was more of a short-distance glider than an active flier.
 
The longest trail of fossilized human footprints hints at a risky Ice Age trek The more than 1.5-kilometer-long trail was made by a young adult carrying a toddler The longest set of human footprints, dated to the Ice Age, were possibly made by a young woman carrying a toddler (illustrated).
 
Galileo's famous gravity experiment holds up, even with individual atoms Different types of atoms fall with the same acceleration due to gravity Individual atoms fall at the same rate due to gravity, scientists report, reaffirming a concept called the equivalence principle.
 
These human nerve cell tendrils turned to glass nearly 2,000 years ago Part of a young man's brain was preserved by hot ash from Mount Vesuvius' A.D. 79 eruption Nerve cells (tendrils in this microscope image) turned to glass inside the brain of a young man who died in Mount Vesuvius' A.D. 79 eruption, preserving these neurons for nearly 2,000 year…
 
How malaria parasites hide from the human immune system The parasite may turn genes on or off to allow the spleen to clean up infected blood cells Once transmitted to a person via mosquito bite, the malaria-causing parasite, Plasmodium falciparum (shown purple) , multiplies within red blood cells.
 
Ardi and her discoverers shake up hominid evolution in 'Fossil Men' A new book blends science and drama to tell the story of a major paleoanthropology find The story of the discovery of Ardi, the hominid skeleton shown in this composite image, involves a colorful cast of characters and plenty of drama.…
 
On a cool night in Malaysia, scientists track mysterious colugos across the treetops A reporter tags along for nighttime observations of these elusive mammals Colugos are nocturnal, tree-living mammals.
 
How environmental changes may have helped make ancient humans more adaptable A sediment core traces 1 million years of ecological shifts in eastern Africa Drilling by an African company in Kenya's Koora basin produced a sediment core that records much of the last 1 million years of environmental events in that area, including some that may have cha…
 
Doubts over a 'possible sign of life' on Venus show how science works Further searches for reported hints of phosphine have been turning up empty Earth's neighbor planet Venus, shown here in an artist's impression, is under the microscope after a contested report of phosphine in its clouds.
 
Easy interventions like revamping forms help people show up to court Behavioral nudges can prevent people from facing an arrest warrant for a missed court date In New York City, about 40 percent of people issued a court summons for a minor infraction, such as disorderly conduct, never show up, which can trigger a warrant for their arrest.…
 
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