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At the intersection of ideas and action, showcasing innovative insights from industry professionals around the world presented by Longitude.site fellows. Our episodes explore thought provoking stories on a series of core values that are essential in every career - ranging from creativity, motivation, and collaboration to many others.
 
Hosted by award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, Melissa Joy Dobbins, the Guilt-Free RD® - "because food shouldn't make you feel bad!" Join Melissa’s conversations with experts including researchers, academics, authors, dietitians and more as they delve into the science, psychology and strategies behind good food and nutrition. This podcast provides food for thought on a variety of topics ranging from fad diets to farming. Walk away with credible information to help you make your o ...
 
In this podcast series you will find information on wellness cleanses, yoga, healthy recipes, meditation, retreats I lead, and how your wellness and zero-waste living go hand in hand. We talk food . . . a lot! I have a background in food science that goes back 25 years now. Over the course of that time, I have studied wellness from pretty much every aspect from Ayurveda to Chinese medicine, from Reiki to Reflexology, from Yoga to Tai Chi, from sound healing to my fun days at Stanford School ...
 
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Soundings

Stanford Storytelling Project

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The Stanford Storytelling Project is an arts program at Stanford University that explores how we live in and through stories and how we can use them to change our lives. Our mission is to promote the transformative nature of traditional and modern oral storytelling, from Lakota tales to Radiolab, and empower students to create and perform their own stories. The project sponsors courses, workshops, live events, and grants, along with its radio show State of the Human.
 
Dr. Branner was a recognized authority on the geology of South American republics, especially Brazil, having organized and headed the Stanford Expedition to Brazil in 1911, among others. In 1910 he published this "little book", as the author himself calls it, for the use of English-speaking students who needed a fast and practical way of learning Portuguese. Contrary to the belief of many back then, John C. Branner claims that Brazilian Portuguese isn't "badly spoken Portuguese", and, even t ...
 
Are you worried about your sleep and health? Are you bothered by lack of sleep or fatigue? Are you suffering from insomnia, sleep apnea, or other sleep disorders? Do you feel your sleep difficulties are getting in the way of being successful, happy, and motivated? Deep into Sleep podcast is here to assist you find the answers. Dr. Yishan Xu, a licensed clinical psychologist and a board-certified sleep specialist trained in Stanford Sleep Center, explores inspiring conversations with guests f ...
 
Causes Or Cures is a public health podcast hosted by Dr. Eeks! You can reach her via bloomingwellness.com and read her blog & a bigger bio there. She works in the field of public health as an analyst, with a focus on epidemiology and scientific communications, and has a penchant for using humor as a health tool. She is currently consulting on several public health initiatives at the national and international level, including the COVID response. She strongly dislikes credentialism, but she h ...
 
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Whether grainy or smooth, spicy or sweet, Dijon, American, or English, mustard accompanies our food and flavors our life around the globe. It has been a source of pleasure, health, and myth from ancient times to the present day, its tiny seed a symbol of faith and its pungent flavor a testimony to refined taste. There are stories of mustard plaster…
 
Shao-yun Yang's The Way of the Barbarians: Redrawing Ethnic Boundaries in Tang and Song China (University of Washington Press, 2019) challenges assumptions that the cultural and socioeconomic watershed of the Tang-Song transition (800–1127 CE) was marked by a xenophobic or nationalist hardening of ethnocultural boundaries in response to growing for…
 
Pink Revolutions: Globalization, Hindutva, and Queer Triangles in Contemporary India (Northwestern UP, 2021) describes how queer politics in India occupies an uneasy position between the forces of neoliberal globalization, on the one hand, and the nationalist Hindu fundamentalism that has emerged since the 1990s, on the other. While neoliberal forc…
 
Herculaneum Uncovered is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, Director of Research and Honorary Professor of Roman Studies in the Faculty of Classics at the University of Cambridge. This wide-ranging conversation covers his fascinating archeological work done in Herculaneum and Pompeii, the poli…
 
In the early twentieth century, when many US unions disgracefully excluded black and Asian workers, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) warmly welcomed people of color, in keeping with their emphasis on class solidarity and their bold motto: "An Injury to One Is an Injury to All!" A brilliant union organizer and a humorous orator, Benjamin Fl…
 
Known around the world simply as Lula, Luis Inácio Lula da Silva was born in 1945 to illiterate parents who migrated to industrializing São Paulo. He learned to read at ten years of age, left school at fourteen, became a skilled metalworker, rose to union leadership, helped end a military dictatorship--and in 2003 became the thirty-fifth president …
 
Since the turn of the millennium, protests, meetings, schoolrooms, reading groups and many other social forms have been proposed as artworks or, more ambiguously, as interventions that are somewhere between art and politics. Kim Charnley's Sociopolitical Aesthetics: Art, Crisis and Neoliberalism (Bloomsbury, 2021) traces key currents of theory and …
 
The volume, Performing Environmentalisms: Expressive Culture and Ecological Change, edited by John Holmes McDowell, Katherine Borland, Rebecca Dirksen, and Sue Tuohy (University of Illinois Press, 2021), illustrates the power of performing diverse environmentalisms to highlight alternative ways of human beingness to improve the prospects for mainta…
 
For all that is known about the depth and breadth of African American history, we still understand surprisingly little about the lives of African American children, particularly those affected by northern emancipation. But hidden in institutional records, school primers and penmanship books, biographical sketches, and unpublished documents is a ric…
 
White middle-class eaters are increasingly venturing into historically segregated urban neighborhoods in search of "authentic" eating in restaurants run by-and originally catering to-immigrants and people of color. What does a growing white interest in these foods mean for historically immigrant neighborhoods and communities of color? What role doe…
 
Today I talked to Dina Greenberg about her new novel Nermina's Chance (Atmosphere Press, 2021). Nermina is a medical student in Sarajevo. She’s been raised in an educated family of Westernized, secular Muslims, but it’s 1992 and the Serbian Chetniks have started to destroy the city. Her mother and brother are murdered and Nermina is brutally raped.…
 
Deep new rifts are tearing apart the fabric of Britain and other Western societies: thriving cities versus the provinces; the high-skilled elite versus the less educated. As these divides deepen, we have lost the sense of ethical, reciprocal obligations to others that were crucial to the rise of post-war prosperity — and are inherently aligned with…
 
We speak with Elizabeth Kiss about the design and launch of the very successful SUMMIT initiative that led Agnes Scott College to be recognized as “the most innovative liberal arts college” in the U.S. SUMMIT features four distinctive elements that are a part of every Agnes Scott undergrad’s education: a global immersive experience, leadership, a p…
 
Eric Berkowitz has written a short history of a censorship, a large topic that has been a phenomenon since the advent of recorded history. In Dangerous Ideas: A Brief History of Censorship in the West from the Ancients to Fake News (Beacon Press, 2021), Berkowitz reviews the motives and methods of governments, religious authorities, and private cit…
 
Sleep Insights is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Matthew Walker, Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology and Founder and Director of the Center for Human Sleep Science at UC Berkeley. This extensive conversation gives a clear and compelling picture of our recent understanding of sleep’s essential role in our dai…
 
Nations have powerful incentives to ensure that their military alliances are well-structured. Successful military alliances set long-lasting foundations for global and regional order, while unsuccessful ones can perpetuate and widen conflict. In Following the Leader: International Order, Alliance Strategies, and Emulation (Stanford UP, 2021), Kuo a…
 
After One Hundred Winters: In Search of Reconciliation on America's Stolen Lands (Princeton UP, 2021) confronts the harsh truth that the United States was founded on the violent dispossession of Indigenous people and asks what reconciliation might mean in light of this haunted history. In this timely and urgent book, settler historian Margaret Jaco…
 
How do Black women entrepreneurs in South Africa play off westerners’ fear and desire for impoverished townships through home-based tourist accommodations? This episode’s guest is Dr. Annie Hikido, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Colby College. She tells us how her racialized experiences growing up as a Japanese-American woman in California pus…
 
Kevin Bruyneel confronts the chronic displacement of Indigeneity in the politics and discourse around race in American political theory and culture, arguing that the ongoing influence of settler-colonialism has undermined efforts to understand Indigenous politics while also hindering conversation around race itself. By reexamining major episodes, t…
 
Great Britain’s Regency Era (1811–1820) has long been wildly popular as a subject of historical fiction yet overly focused on the romance genre. The towering figures of Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer have tended to dominate the field to the point where even novels that are not primarily romances exist within Austen’s world. But as we can see from …
 
Born in Prague to Holocaust survivors, Hadassah Lieberman and her family immigrated in 1949 to the United States. She went on to earn a BA from Boston University in government and dramatics and an MA in international relations and American government from Northeastern University. She built a career devoted largely to public health that has included…
 
The second of three volumes of essays that engage Japanese philosophers as intercultural thinkers, this collection critically probes seminal works for their historical significance and contemporary relevance. Japanese Philosophy in the Making 2: Borderline Interrogations (Chisokudo, 2019) shows how the relational ethics of Watsuji Tetsurō serves as…
 
The concept of revolution marks the ultimate horizon of modern politics. It is instantiated by sites of both hope and horror. Within progressive thought, “revolution” often perpetuates entrenched philosophical problems: a teleological philosophy of history, economic reductionism, and normative paternalism. At a time of resurgent uprisings, how can …
 
David Troy is a serial entrepreneur and community activist in Baltimore, Maryland. This podcast was recorded in 2019 for Project Kazimierz. Dave is CEO and product architect at 410 Labs, maker of the popular e-mail management tools Mailstrom.co and Chuck. He has been acknowledged by the founding team at Twitter as the first developer to utilize the…
 
In this episode of Causes or Cures, Dr. Eeks chats with Dr. Suresh Kuchipudi about his newly published research on the presence of SARS-Cov-2 ( COVID-19) in white-tailed deer. He will discuss how they conducted the study, its findings and what they could mean for viral transmission, the "spillover" of SARS-Cov-2 from humans to deer and how it most …
 
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