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The Dose

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The Dose

The Commonwealth Fund

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The Dose is the Commonwealth Fund’s podcast that asks, What can the U.S. do differently when it comes to health care? Join host Shanoor Seervai every other Friday for conversations with leading and emerging experts. This season we’re focusing on new ideas that could strengthen and improve health care for everyone. Get the Dose in your inbox: https://thedose.show/signup
 
Produced live at WGBH Studios in Boston, Basic Black *is the longest-running program on public television focusing on the interests of people of color. The show, which was originally called *Say Brother, was created in 1968 during the height of the civil rights movement as a response to the demand for public television programs reflecting the concerns of communities of color. Each episode features a panel discussion across geographic borders and generational lines with the most current stori ...
 
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show series
 
The U.S. maternal health crisis has been well documented. Black Americans are three times as likely as white Americans to die from pregnancy-related causes. Why do these disparities persist? And what would it take to dismantle structural racism in reproductive health care? On the latest episode of The Dose, Rachel Hardeman, tenured associate profes…
 
Vaccines have saved thousands of lives and are an incredible tool in the seemingly endless battle against the coronavirus. But even with COVID surging anew in Europe as winter approaches, the rate at which Americans are getting vaccinated has plateaued. On the latest episode of The Dose, Alison Galvani, founding director of the Yale Center for Infe…
 
The U.S. housing crisis and health care are inextricably linked. Compared to the general population, people experiencing homelessness have higher rates of illness and mortality. These struggles are even more acute for transgender people, who often face discrimination when they seek both housing and health care. On the latest episode of The Dose, Pa…
 
Basic Black The panelist discuss the Boston mayoral race between Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi George. How will the historic run for mayor change the perception of Boston and what issues will impact communities of color? Dr. Paul Watanabe, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Institute for Asian American Studies at UMass, Boston Tan…
 
When the pandemic hit last March, mental health care, which was typically delivered in face-to-face sessions, rapidly moved online. At a time when the need for support was greater than ever, this was a welcome shift. But as we glance – with cautious optimism – toward a return to “normal,” will telehealth be the dominant mode of delivering mental he…
 
While rich countries are doling out booster shots of the COVID-19 vaccine, many poor countries have vaccinated less than five percent of their population. And, while many leaders agree that vaccinating the world is the only way out of the pandemic, vaccines are still not moving around the globe in a rapid and equitable manner. This is because “we l…
 
Even as the Delta variant rages through the U.S., many Americans have not received a COVID-19 vaccine. The reasons are complex, but for Black and Latinx communities, a long history of poor access to health care has been a tall barrier. On the first episode of our brand-new season of The Dose podcast, host Shanoor Seervai talks to Rhea Boyd, M.D., a…
 
The Dose is the Commonwealth Fund’s podcast that asks, What can the U.S. do differently when it comes to health care? Join host Shanoor Seervai every other Friday for conversations with leading and emerging experts. This season we’re focusing on new ideas that could strengthen and improve health care for everyone. Get the Dose in your inbox: https:…
 
Many Americans have started to behave as if the pandemic is over, but large numbers of people remain unvaccinated. At the same time, other parts of the world are experiencing their worst COVID-19 surges yet. On the season finale of The Dose, Sandro Galea, physician, epidemiologist, and dean of the Boston University School of Public Health, talks ab…
 
When the pandemic hit last March, the U.S. was still facing another major public health crisis —the opioid epidemic. Between COVID-19 lockdowns and economic devastation, overdose deaths soared. Experts estimate that around 90,000 people died of a drug overdose in 2020. That’s the highest number of overdose deaths ever, and it represents the largest…
 
Many of us can recall a time we felt nervous about seeing a doctor. Maybe it was because we were wary about how much the visit would cost, or what a diagnosis would mean for our health. Now, imagine how much more stress you would feel if you had experienced trauma — from domestic violence or human trafficking, for example. Trauma survivors are the …
 
Migrants are crossing the southern border in record numbers this year, many of them unaccompanied children. What happens to them once they make it into the U.S., or if they've been here for a long time, when they need health care? On the latest episode of The Dose podcast, Carrie Byington, executive vice president of University of California Health…
 
The Biden-Harris administration has taken several measures in its first three months to strengthen the nation’s social safety net. Many of these policies will have an outsized impact on women — particularly women of color, who often struggle to access health care and now are bearing the brunt of the COVID-induced economic crisis. From mandating pai…
 
Hate crimes against Asians in the United States more than doubled from 2019 to 2020. Last month, in one of the most conspicuous acts of violence against Asians in recent history, six Asian American women were shot dead in Georgia. Racism against people of Asian descent is not a new problem, but it has been exacerbated of late by politicians using r…
 
If you’re an optimist, then every piece of good news about vaccine approvals and shots in arms has put the end of the pandemic in sight. If you’re a pessimist, then all the new variants with names sounding like computer-generated passwords signal the apocalypse. Will hope win, or will dread? On the latest episode of The Dose podcast, Eric Schneider…
 
Health care workers are among the heroes of the pandemic. One year in, many of us are experiencing stress, fatigue, and grief. But this can pale in comparison to the toll faced by those caring for the sick and dying on a daily basis. On this episode of The Dose, we listen to the stories of one group of frontline health workers: nurses. Often dealin…
 
Violence kills thousands of Americans each year and sends many more to the hospital with life-threatening injuries. Even though many people recover physically, the issues that cause violence often go unchecked. On today’s episode of The Dose, we talk about how interventions, both in hospitals and in communities, that can help break the cycle of vio…
 
Living with the COVID-19 pandemic for a year, it’s hard to process the numbers. What we know is that nearly 500,000 Americans have lost their lives, and that Black, Latino, and Indigenous people are worst impacted. But behind the statistics are stories, and on the latest episode of The Dose, we listen to one of those stories. Our guest, Dr. Magdala…
 
Almost a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. faces another health crisis – one of loneliness. Between lockdowns, social distancing, and the fear that contact with others could make us sick, many people are living in isolation. But there are ways to cope. On this episode of The Dose podcast, Matthew Pantell and Laura Shields-Zeeman, researcher…
 
A year into the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States appears to have learned few lessons from its disastrous early response. Hasty lockdowns and bungled reopenings have now given way to a sluggish and uncoordinated vaccine rollout. This month, the daily death toll crossed 4,000, and hospitals in many parts of the country are overflowing with sick p…
 
This week the show will discuss the Covid vaccines and how to move beyond fear, history and distrust of the medical community amongst people of color. It’s no secret that there has been a painful history that Black people have endured within the medical community, from the high-profile stories of the Tuskegee study to Henrietta Lacks. However, beyo…
 
COVID-19 brought the lives of college students to an abrupt standstill – being in a classroom, a dormitory, a dining hall table with friends became risky activities overnight. How did universities navigate the impossible tradeoff between having students on campus with the risks of the coronavirus, and keeping students remote but putting their educa…
 
A new president doesn’t get four years to shape health care, he gets six months. And for President-elect Joe Biden, the most pressing health care issue is – no surprise here – COVID-19. On this episode of The Dose, the Commonwealth Fund’s President David Blumenthal, M.D., talks about Biden’s opportunity to leave a lasting health-care legacy by brin…
 
President-elect Joe Biden says he is committed to strengthening the Affordable Care Act so that all Americans can get the health care they need. He also wants to work with people of all political stripes: in his acceptance speech, he said it’s time “to listen to each other again.” This week on The Dose podcast, we’re bringing back an earlier episod…
 
People who are incarcerated have complex health needs, and to make matters more complicated, prisons and jails have seen some of the worst COVID-19 outbreaks in the U.S. But what happens when they leave prison or jail and need to receive health care on the outside? Many states that have expanded Medicaid are also trying to ensure that people leavin…
 
Masks. Lockdowns. Shuttered businesses. Hospitals strained beyond capacity. Weary of the pandemic’s myriad disruptions to normal life, many Americans are pinning their hopes on a COVID-19 vaccine. But even if an effective one is developed, it won’t make the virus magically disappear. On today’s episode of The Dose podcast, Dr. Margaret “Peggy” Hamb…
 
Americans are stressed about COVID-19 – both the disease and what it’s doing to the economy. And while the virus has touched every corner of the globe, many high-income countries have been more successful than the U.S. at easing some of the pandemic’s pain. This week on The Dose podcast, we talk about why Americans are experiencing the anxiety and …
 
Health care is always important for voters, but this year, it is at the top of everyone's mind. The health needs and economic costs of COVID-19, and protections for people with pre-existing health conditions tie for first place in the Commonwealth Fund’s latest poll on which health care issue matters most to voters in the 2020 election. Voters are …
 
Hospitals in the U.S. started preparing for COVID-19 as early as January, but it wasn’t until Italian doctors started tweeting in March that they had to decide which patients would get ventilators that Michael Apkon realized the severity of the crisis. On the latest episode of The Dose, Apkon, President and CEO of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, ta…
 
***Originally Aired Nov 2019*** Bias in medicine – based on race and sex – is a well-documented problem. It’s a problem because the health care system has historically marginalized the medical concerns of people of color and women, which has led to worse health outcomes. On this episode of The Dose, host Shanoor Seervai discusses ways to tackle bia…
 
***Originally Aired Feb 2020*** More than 800 women across the globe die each day from complications related to pregnancy. Some of them bleed to death. Some of them develop infections or severe life-long medical conditions because they are delivering their babies in unsafe environments. Many of these deaths could be prevented if more young people h…
 
***Originally Aired Oct 2019*** African American women die of pregnancy-related causes at three times the rate for white women, even after accounting for income, education, and access to other resources. What is it about being born black in America that leads to such outcomes? To answer this question, Shanoor Seervai interviews Kennetha Gaines, cli…
 
Protests sparked by the death of George Floyd saw an outpouring of people across the world demanding an end to police-involved shootings and an end to systemic racism---while COVID-19 continues. The protesters willingly took to the streets—and continue to do so—voicing their outrage. But we also saw how activism has evolved, with activists who are …
 
When the pandemic hit, millions of Americans found themselves in a tight spot – practice social distancing to avoid COVID-19, but what if you have a health condition that requires seeing a doctor? Technology could transform the way people access health care, and the U.S. has made huge investments in this over the past decade. But, as health technol…
 
On June 12, the Trump administration eliminated federal protections against discrimination in health care for transgender people. This means that transgender Americans can be denied access to health coverage and care – simply because they are trans. With the U.S. still grappling with COVID-19, the decision could make it more difficult for trans peo…
 
COVID-19 cases in the U.S. are climbing again, and data show that Black and Latinx Americans are contracting and dying of COVID-19 at higher rates than white Americans. The reasons for are complex, including: people of color are more likely to be poor, work in industries that expose them to the virus, live in crowded spaces, and have chronic health…
 
George Floyd’s life was snuffed out on the streets of Minneapolis, Armaud Arbery was gunned down on a Georgia road, and Breonna Taylor shot to death in her sleep. Millions have taken to the streets in multiracial worldwide protests declaring that Black Lives Matter. Celebrity athletes, corporations, and ordinary Americans are demanding police refor…
 
Every day, primary care providers are on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, treating sick patients even as they worry about bringing the virus home to their families. Many still lack adequate protective gear, and many worry about the financial stability of their practices. With the U.S. starting to reopen, we need our primary care practices …
 
Over the last few months everyone has been gripped by COVID 19, and now we are faced with a reckoning, ripping at the heart of Black America and the world, about police-involved shootings resulting in the deaths of black people. The disturbing killing of George Floyd sparked outrage, anger and protests. Will the death of George Floyd change how Afr…
 
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