Tofugu public
[search 0]

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
もったいない (mottainai) is a unique Japanese word that articulates the sense of regret, guilt, and sorrow you feel for wasting all sorts of things — food, physical objects, time, opportunities, and potential.In this episode, Kanae and Jenny (big fans of mottainai) talk about the nuances of the word, as well as Japan's cultural and religious views that h…
 
Although んだ (nda) and んです(ndesu) are very common ways of ending Japanese sentences, they can be challenging for English speakers to understand because there's no equivalent to these in English.In this episode, Kanae and Rachel discuss what these sentence enders really are (I mean, what the heck is the ん anyway, right?), and how they are used.After …
 
The particles に (Ni) and で (De) can both be used to specify locations, but each serves a different purpose. If you ever wondered how they're different, or you've been using them without knowing the difference, this episode is for you!In this episode, Kanae and Rachel discuss the basic difference and illustrate it using examples and quizzes. They ev…
 
The Japanese second-person pronoun, お前 (omae), has different sides to its personality, just like other personal pronouns.This is the third episode of our Japanese second-person pronoun series. In this episode, the Tofugu crew, comprised of Kanae, Mami, and Rachel, discuss the various nuances of お前. This includes how grandpas and grandmas sometimes …
 
A Japanese second-person pronoun, 君 (kimi) carries different nuances. It could be friendly, poetic, endearing, or even condescending (!).This is the second episode of our Japanese second-person pronoun series. In this episode, the Tofugu crew, which features Kanae, Mami, and Rachel, discuss the various nuances of 君, including how 君 is the perfect p…
 
Have you ever wondered if the Japanese second-person pronoun, あなた (anata), is rude or polite?This is the first episode of our Japanese second-person pronoun series. In this episode, the Tofugu crew, Cameron and Kanae, try to clear the myth of あなた being rude or being polite. They also discuss how and where people actually use あなた.…
 
This is the fourth episode of our What Should I Call "You"? series.In Japanese, pronouns for "others" (which includes everything besides "I" — "you" "they" / "she" / "he" ) are not generally used in conversation. In this series, the Tofugu crew discusses different ways to refer to others without using pronouns.In this episode, Kanae, Cameron and Ma…
 
This is the third episode of our What Should I Call "You"? series.In Japanese, pronouns for "others" (which includes everything besides "I" — "you" "they" / "she" / "he" ) are not generally used in conversation. In this series, the Tofugu crew discusses different ways to refer to others without using pronouns.In this episode, Kanae, Cameron and Mam…
 
This is the second episode of our "What Should I Call 'You'?" series.In Japanese, pronouns for "others" (which includes everything besides "I" — "you" "they" / "she" / "he" ) are not generally used in conversation. In this series, the Tofugu crew discusses different ways to refer to others without using pronouns.In this episode, Kanae, Jenny and Ra…
 
This is the first episode of our "What Should I Call 'You'?" series.In Japanese, pronouns for "others" (which includes everything besides "I" — "you" "they" / "she" / "he" ) are not generally used in conversation. In this series, the Tofugu crew discusses different ways to refer to others without using pronouns.In this episode, Kanae, Jenny and Rac…
 
In this episode, Mami, Cameron, and Kanae talk about two sentence-ending particles, よ (yo) and ね (ne). They dive deep into their different nuances and uses, with a lot of examples. Also make sure not to miss a special cameo appearance of a very special holiday guest! After listening to this episode, check out our article on Tofugu.com for more info…
 
This is the second episode in our two-part さすが (sasuga) miniseries. The Tofugu crew — Kanae, Jenny and Mami — discuss the "other," overshadowed use of さすが, which is not for compliments. This discussion led to the discovery of Kanae's weird and controversial bathroom habits.After listening to the episode, check our article "さすが Is Not Always A Compl…
 
This is the first episode in our two-part miniseries about the unique Japanese word さすが (sasuga). In this episode, the Tofugu crew — Kanae, Jenny and Mami — discuss the nuances of さすが when it's used as a compliment. Listen carefully and you'll even learn about a quirky eating habit of Mami's from her high school days.…
 
Put on your thinking caps, folks! In this episode, the Tofugu crew — Kanae, Cameron, Mami, and Rachel — discuss the differences between 考える and 思う, two Japanese words for "think."After listening to the episode, check our article to do some more thinking about "thinking":https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/omou-kangaeru/…
 
In this episode, two native Japanese speakers (Kanae/Mami) and two English-speaking Japanese learners (Cameron/Rachel) discuss two types of noun-based adjectives, な-adjectives and の-adjectives.Later in the episode, the Tofugu Crew goes through quizzes such as "What's the difference between 本当な〜 and 本当の〜?" to help deepen their understanding.After li…
 
In this episode, the Tofugu crew, Kanae, Cameron, and Rachel discuss the word "senpai," its use in Japanese schools and society, and Kanae's lasting trauma surrounding white socks from her senpai experience.After listening to the episode, check more details in our article: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/senpai/…
 
Did you know there are people who are 先生 (sensei) besides teachers or your judo instructor Sensei Jeff? In this episode, the Tofugu crew, Kanae, Jenny, and Rachel discuss the word "sensei" from their personal experience and introduce many different kinds of sensei beyond teachers.After listening to the episode, check more details in our article: ht…
 
In this episode, Tofugu's research team answers questions about だ and です from our listeners, such as:"What would be the best translation of です?""When and how does it make sense to switch between です to だ when meeting somebody new?"After listening to this episode, go check out our article on Tofugu.com for more info: "だ and です : Venturing beyond Text…
 
In this episode, the Tofugu research team answers questions about だ and です from our listeners, such as:"Is it true that だ isn't just a less polite form of です?""What are the real differences between だ and です?"After listening to this episode, check out our article on Tofugu.com for more info:"だ and です : Venturing beyond Textbook Rules into Real-Life …
 
This is the finale of our "First-Person Pronouns" series.In this episode, Kanae welcomes new co-hosts Cameron and Javi to discuss the use of traditionally male first-person pronouns such as 僕 or 俺 by female speakers. The discussion spans use in Japanese pop culture, media, celebrities, and the LGBTQ community.After you’ve listened to this episode, …
 
This is the fifth episode in our "First-Person Pronouns" series.In this episode, we talk about using your own name as a first-person pronoun (and the anatomy of Anpanman).After you’ve listened to this episode, check out our article on Japanese first-person pronouns:https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/japanese-first-person-pronouns/…
 
This is the fourth episode in our "First-Person Pronouns" series.In this episode, we talk about 俺 (おれ) and why it is so tricky for Japanese learners to master. After you’ve listened to this episode, check out our article on Japanese first-person pronouns:https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/japanese-first-person-pronouns/…
 
This is the third episode in our "First-Person Pronouns" series.In this episode, Koichi, Michael, and Kanae discuss their own personal experiences with 僕 (ぼく), as well as how to sound more hip when using it.After you’ve listened to this episode, check out our article on Japanese first-person pronouns:https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/japanese-first-p…
 
This is the second episode in our "First-Person Pronouns" series.In this episode, we talk about うち. Though rarely taught in textbooks, うち is used fairly commonly in real life, especially in Kansai and between young females.After you’ve listened to this episode, check out our article on Japanese first-person pronouns:https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/…
 
In this, the first episode in our "First-Person Pronouns" series, we talk about わたし, わたくし and あたし. Despite all coming from the kanji 私, each of these three pronouns carries a different level of formality and gives a different impression.We’ve included some exercises to practice things like which specific situations call for わたし and which call for わ…
 
We talk about the counters that count living things (頭, 匹, 人, and 羽) and how they overlap with each other. We also answer the hard Japanese counter questions like: can you count a robot with 人? What about a cyborg? How big can a 匹 animal be? What counter is worthy of the King of the Monsters?After you're done listening to this, learn way, way more …
 
Find and watch the Big in Japan documentary here:http://www.biginjapandoc.comWe interviewed David Elliot-Jones, the writer/producer of the Big in Japan documentary. He tells us why he went to Japan with two of his friends (Lachlan Mcleod: Director, Louis Dai: Editor) to "do anything he could to become famous." Everybody thinks they can become famou…
 
For more, check out our article on ganbaru: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/ganbaru/"Do your best!" "Hang in there!" "FIGHT!" The Japanese verb 頑張る has a wide variety of English translations, and that's because it's such a nuanced word. Depending on how you say it and who you say it to, it could be an encouragement or a real downer.The Tofugu team …
 
You may already know that, in Japanese, you add a polite little something at the end of someone’s name: ~san, ~sama, ~chan, ~kun… actually, there are lot more honorific name enders than that. And there are a lot of rules for using them correctly, too.The Tofugu team discusses seven common names enders and how to use them, not to mention nine histor…
 
Have you ever wondered why 人々 is ひとびと and not ひとひと, or even ひとぴと? Or why it’s てがみ instead of てかみ, or くさばな and not くさはな?It’s all because of a little thing called rendaku, or “sequential voicing,” which we talk about in this episode. While most Japanese teachers will just say, “it’s a mystery,” we’ll teach you the rules that make things rendaku or no…
 
Hi, it's me, Sensei Jeff. I'm here to teach all you white belts how to count in Japanese. Punch! Punch! Punch!(Actually, we teach you how to count from zero to uh... a mysterious number. And, we teach you how to count in the Japanese style, rather than the Chinese style that's more common. It's a pretty neat episode, despite sounding so basic. Read…
 
Get Brian's Book, Japanese Whisky: The Ultimate Guide to the World's Most Desirable Spirit → https://amzn.to/2NAEqPRMichael and Koichi interview Brian Ashcraft–author of several Japan-related books–about his latest book, Japanese Whisky: The Ultimate Guide to the World's Most Desirable Spirit. He tells us what makes Japanese whisky "Japanese" as we…
 
In this episode we get into Japanese pronunciation.Whether you are a beginner, advanced, or fluent, you'll find something in this episode that will help you to improve your pronunciation. To read more, check out our (really in-depth) guide:https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/japanese-pronunciation/By Tofugu
 
Prefer reading instead? We wrote a whole article about this (even more example sentences included!)https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/komu-compound-verbsHave you ever seen the Japanese verb 込む? On its own, it means "to be packed" or "to be crowded." But, this verb is also used in compound verbs... 255+ of them, in fact! You may have seen examples of t…
 
Traveling around Japan in a large group (10 or more) may seem impossible. But let me tell you, friends, it is very possible.In fact, the Tofugu team recently went on a trip to Japan organized and led by our very own Koichi. In this episode, he tells you how he planned an weeklong international trip for 15 people. He got everything together, led eve…
 
Valentine's Day 2: PAYBACK!That should be the name of "White Day," Japan's sequel to Valentine's Day, which is exactly one month later, on March 14.But what does one do on White Day, exactly? All the gifts has been given. All the love received. What's left?Boy howdy, to understand what's going on, Koichi, Kanae, and Michael discuss how Japan's Vale…
 
Friend of the podcast, Alex O Smith returns! After two decades translating video games (including many Final Fantasies), Alex has accumulated quite a few stories from inside the Japanese video game industry. Some of his excellent tales include:- The incredibly insane task of voicing every line of dialogue in Final Fantasy X.- How he basically didn'…
 
It's tough making friends in a new place. Different people have different ways of going about it. Throw in a culture and language barrier and it can be downright frustrating. For these reasons and more, visitors and new residents to Japan often worry about making friends. That's why the Tofugu Team got together with returning co-host Kanae (she's b…
 
Read the series: https://tfg.li/2oM5rYr---After a year of collecting the best Japanese learning resources every month and delivering them straight to your eyeballs, Tofugu sits down to discuss which study tools are the best of the best.We divided all the resources into six categories. Then each host (Koichi, Michael, and Kristen) picked their favs …
 
If you want to find your way into the Japanese video game industry, there's no better example we can point to than Ben Judd, a Capcom veteran responsible for giving Phoenix Wright his English voice.But we'll do you one better than just "pointing to him." We TALKED with him for over an hour about his experience breaking into Japanese work culture, e…
 
Learn how to ace the JET Program interview with our complete guide: https://tfg.li/2dgr4vm---If you want to live and work in Japan, the JET Program is one of the best ways to do it. But it's a competitive program that requires you pass a high-stress, high stakes interview with three people grilling you for thirty minutes.That's why we talked with s…
 
"Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll stop emailing you about free fish." - Koichi (probably)Learning Japanese on your own can be challenging. Especially when you need clarification about abstract concepts, how to pronounce kanji, and how native speakers use certain words. We're here to show you that you can…
 
Running a record label that brings Japanese rock music to the US is not easy. But if anyone can do it, it’s Robby Takac, the bassist for the Goo Goo Dolls. He knows the ins-and-outs of the music industry pretty well; his band has double and triple platinum records and a globetrotting tour schedule.We talked to Robby about his record label, Good Cha…
 
YouTuber Loretta "Kemushichan" has been making videos about Japan and the Japanese language for over 10 years now. And because of her expertise, we asked her to write an article for us (which you can read here: https://tfg.li/2C46DcV) and invited her on the Tofugu Podcast to drop some knowledge bombs.Knowledge bombs liiiiiiike...- The secrets she u…
 
Resources for learning Japanese we talk about in this episode:- Using SRS to Learn Japanese: https://tfg.li/2ila3Q1- How to Study Japanese with Sentences: https://tfg.li/2iOtnc6- Language Shadowing: https://tfg.li/2AMWZgW==="You can learn Japanese from anime!"You’ve probably seen promises like these floating around the Internet. Maybe you’ve secret…
 
There’s a clothing brand here in Portland that Koichi is a big fan of. It’s called Kiriko.What makes Kiriko special? The company makes clothing out of reclaimed Japanese fabric, some of it over 100 years old. But more important, they promote taking time to appreciate simplicity and quality. That’s why they sell more than just clothing; ceramics, co…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login