show episodes
 
War in the Air was written during a prolific time in H. G. Wells's writing career. Having withdrawn from British politics to spend more time on his own ideas, he published twelve books between 1901 and 1911, including this one. while many British citizens were surprised by the advent of World War I, Wells had already written prophetically about such a conflict. War in the Air predicted use of airplanes in modern war. (Summary by Bill Boerst)
 
Extraterrestrial invasion, the earth taken over by omniscient intelligences from Mars, the whole of humanity under siege and a nameless narrator who seems to be the lone survivor of the complete devastation of human civilization – scenes from a Hollywood sci-fi blockbuster? Far from it! The War of the Worlds by HG Wells was written more than a century ago and went on to become an iconic work in the science fiction genre, spawning a whole new genre of literature featuring alien invaders. It w ...
 
War of the Worlds by Herbert George Wells (H.G. Wells) was published in 1898 at a time when he wrote a series of novels related to a number of historical events of the time. The most important of these was the unification and militarization of Germany. The story, written in a semi-documentary style, is told in the first person by an unnamed observer. It tells of the events which happen mostly in London and the county of Surrey, England, when a number of vessels manned by aliens are fired fro ...
 
H. G. Wells wrote The War of the Worlds in 1898, when there was much speculation about life on the planet Mars. The book is considered to be one of the first science fiction novels. In the story, an English gentleman narrates the events of a violent and fast paced Martian invasion. The frightening images of people fleeing from gigantic tripod machines and the prospect of life under Martian rule have served as a bottomless well of inspiration for popular culture. The novel has served as a tem ...
 
No one would have believed, in the last years of the nineteenth century, that the Earth was being scrutinised and studied from across the gulf of space. With infinite complacency, humanity went about its little affairs, serene in its assurance of its empire over matter. It is possible that the micro-organisms we watch under a microscope, do the same. Few people gave thought to the idea of life on other planets, and none imagined that it could be so vastly superior in intellect to ourselves. ...
 
LibriVox volunteers bring you 9 recordings of The Song Against Songs by G. K. Chesterton. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for October 16, 2011.Chesterton was a large man, standing 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m) and weighing around 21 stone (130 kg; 290 lb). His girth gave rise to a famous anecdote. During World War I a lady in London asked why he was not 'out at the Front'; he replied, 'If you go round to the side, you will see that I am.' On another occasion he remarked to his friend Geor ...
 
Richard Hardy, a member of the British gentry, tries to resolve problems in his marriage as he travels with a psychiatrist. The book is to a great extent autobiographical. H. G. had read some brillliantly composed articles by a writer who wrote under the name Rebecca West. In one piece she called H. G. "pseudo-scientific." He contacted her and asked what she meant. When they met for lunch, it was the beginning of a very intense and volatile relationship. Soon she was pregnant, so he divided ...
 
New name, same podcast! Burr Martin: Nearly News podcast is hosted by the Internet's "Selfie Dad", who was made famous overnight by recreating his daughters selfies on Instagram. Joined by his wife/co-host, Burr brings his unique brand of humor, nerd experience and C List Internet celebrity status to talk about the strange, odd and downright funny news stories from around the World, plus a few other surprises thrown in. (weekly)
 
The Author Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born in London, England on the 29th of May, 1874. Though he considered himself a mere “rollicking journalist,” he was actually a prolific and gifted writer in virtually every area of literature. A man of strong opinions and enormously talented at defending them, his exuberant personality nevertheless allowed him to maintain warm friendships with people–such as George Bernard Shaw and H. G. Wells–with whom he vehemently disagreed. Chesterton had no diff ...
 
"I think that I shall never see, a poem as lovely as a tree; A tree whose hungry mouth is presd against the sweet earth's flowing breast ...". Almost all of us, including myself of course, have heard and enjoyed those famous words which begin Kilmer's poem, Trees. There is even a National Forest in the United States named in honor of this poem. Here is a recording of the entire book of poems in which it was first published in 1914. Joyce Kilmer was an American writer and poet mainly remember ...
 
Conversations on Peaceful Change is a series of interviews facilitated by Dr. T. V. Paul, James McGill Professor in International Relations at McGill University and the Founding Director of the Global Research Network on Peaceful Change. Scholars such as Dr. Steven Pinker from Harvard University, as well as Dr. Michael Barnett from George Washington University, are interviewed on the subject of peaceful change in contemporary world politics to better comprehend the complexity of the modern-d ...
 
Australia's only national museum of film, video games, digital culture and art - situated at the heart of Melbourne in Fed Square. Listen to our latest podcasts of live events, playlists associated with exhibitions, and more. Located at Fed Square. Open daily. #acmimelbourne www.acmi.net.au
 
In perhaps the most audacious military enterprise in the history of human conquest, Cortez, with only a few hundred men, conquered a civilization of tens of thousands. This is the story of an Englishman who boards a merchant ship destined for the New World, but a shipwreck strands him in Pre-Columbian Mexico, and Roger must find a way to avoid becoming one of the many human sacrifices offered to the Aztec gods.
 
FEEL FREE TO LISTEN TO THIS PODCAST IN ANY ORDER! On a quest to save Manila traffic (and now Pandemic) from boredom, we talk about what's happening around the world on our Trending Topics, answer your burning questions on our Leche Fan Mail, and just bring a wonderful mix *wink wink* of lighthearted fun, humor and reality to your earbuds Hosted by Radio DJ's/Hosts/All-Around Weirdos Rica Garcia and JC Tevez, this show is bound to bring you laughs, silly insights and just a downright good time
 
William Winwood Reade (1838 - 1875) was a British historian, explorer, and philosopher. His most famous work, the Martyrdom of Man (1872)—whose summary running head reads "From Nebula to Nation"—is a secular, "universal" history of the Western world. Structurally, it is divided into four "chapters" of approximately 150 pages each: the first chapter, "War", discusses the imprisonment of men's bodies, the second, "Religion", that of their minds, the third, "Liberty", is the closest thing to a ...
 
Theodore Roosevelt's personal account of The Rough Riders, the name affectionately bestowed on the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry, one of three such regiments raised in 1898 for the Spanish-American War and the only one to see action. Roosevelt, serving first as Lt. Colonel and 2nd in command, gives a rousing depiction of the men and horses, equipment, talent, their trip to Cuba, battle strategies, losses, injuries and victories. He says: "In all the world there could be no better mater ...
 
The THIRD of Four parts in the HeavenField story. Welcome to The HeavenField - a place of dreams and nightmares that waits upon the edge of reality. Nations, clandestine Government Agencies and Supernatural horrors, all these fight for supremacy, and the fate of the world hangs in the balance. Welcome to The HeavenField. The Battle has Begun... The third installment of The HeavenField Novel – a fast-paced science-fiction thriller set within a British experimental Scientific Researcher Facili ...
 
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show series
 
Season's Eatings--Count Chocula & Boo Berry. This Week in Geek--Top bucket list movies to see before you die--Green Lantern HBO Max with focus on several Green Lanterns--Marvel's Thunderbolts comic book getting a reboot--New animated Christmas movie coming from the directors pf Killer Klowns From Outer Space--TMNT The Last Ronin--Google humming. Re…
 
If the US is – in the words of former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright – the "indispensible nation" then the economic, democratic and institutional alliance between the US and the EU is the “essential partnership”. So argues Tony Gardner, Barack Obama’s ambassador to the EU and advisor to Joe Biden’s campaign for president in his new book Star…
 
This week is eye opening as we find out what a town really is, Lazarus syndrome, is a gimp mask a Covid mask and a bunch more. Plus, the Fast 5 and things overheard at a voting booth. Nothings Gonna Stop Us Now performed by Starship Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/burrmartinexperience/ Twitter @burrmartin Instagram @therealburrmartin Please rate…
 
Jason Smith is a Jungian analyst based in the beautiful Cape Ann region north of Boston, Massachusetts.Jason began his training as a psychotherapist at Pacifica Graduate Institute where he received a Master’s degree in Counseling Psychology with an emphasis in Depth Psychology in 2001. After relocating to Massachusetts, Jason began his psychoanalyt…
 
What will the cities of the future look like? Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the answer to that question was clearer: Urban areas around the world were on a trajectory of exponential growth, with 68% of the world's population expected to live in cities by 2050. It's unlikely the pandemic can dramatically alter that unstoppable trend, particularly in…
 
When you mention Japanese War crimes in World War Two, you’ll often get different responses from different generations. The oldest among us will talk about the Bataan Death March. Younger people, coming of age in the 1990s, will mention the Rape of Nanking or the comfort women forced into service by the Japanese army. Occasionally, someone will men…
 
On November 3, 1969 Richard M. Nixon addressed the nation in what would come to be known as “The Silent Majority Speech”. In 32 minutes, the president promoted his plan for a “Vietnamization” of the war and called upon “the great silent majority of my fellow Americans” to support his plan “to end the war in a way that we could win the peace”. Argui…
 
Simone C. Drake and Dwan K. Henderson's Are You Entertained?: Black Popular Culture in the Twenty-First Century (Duke UP, 2020) is an engaging and interdisciplinary exploration of contemporary black popular culture and how to think about this broad and diverse landscape, especially in relation to power, capitalism, gender identity, and presidential…
 
Heather Lende was one of the thousands of women inspired to take a more active role in politics during the past few years. Though her entire campaign for assembly member in Haines, Alaska, cost less than $1,000, she won! But tiny, breathtakingly beautiful Haines—a place accessible from the nearest city, Juneau, only by boat or plane—isn’t the sleep…
 
As the 2020 presidential campaign begins to take shape, there is widespread distrust of the fairness and accuracy of American elections. In Election Meltdown: Dirty Tricks, Distrust, and the Threat to American Democracy (Yale UP, 2020), Richard L. Hasen uses riveting stories illustrating four factors increasing the mistrust. Voter suppression has e…
 
At the end of the 20th century, the liberal international order appeared unassailable after its triumph over the authoritarian challenges of Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia. Twenty years later, however, the assumptions underlying the system appear discredited as international relations devolve into confrontation and conflict. In The New Twenty Years…
 
We have a Leche Fan Mail all the way from General Santos (07:06), we learn about the Civil Service Exam (11:47), and Gatas a Question asking about our Mental Health(15:29) and how to be a spontaneous conversationalist (20:10) Thanks to our sponsors for this mix: LAZADA! Shop on Lazada and help us Leche's out by shopping through this link: https://t…
 
The Protestant Reformation looms large in our cultural imagination. In the standard telling, it’s the moment the world went modern. Casting off the shackles and superstitions of medieval Catholicism, reformers translated the Bible into the vernacular and democratized religion. In this story, it’s no wonder that Protestantism should give birth to li…
 
In my old age, I try to argue more quietly, though I still believe that sharp disagreement is a sign of political seriousness. What engaged citizens think and say matters; we should aim to get it right and to defeat those who get it wrong. I understand the very limited impact of what I write, but I continue to believe that the stakes are high. – Mi…
 
The tail end of the twentieth century was a good time for constitutional lawyers. Leapfrogging around the globe, they offered advice on how to amend, write or rewrite one state constitution after the next following the collapse of the Soviet Union and with it, the communist bloc. Largely overlooked in the flurry of constitution drafting in this per…
 
This week, we're talking trees! From how they grow, to the oldest ones on Earth, to how they die, and what trees can do for our cities. Plus in the news, can you catch COVID twice? How microwaving an insecticide makes it 12 times more powerful, and the asteroid that might actually be an old Moon rocket... Like this podcast? Please help us by suppor…
 
Season's Eatings- Count Chocula & Boo Berry This Week in Geek- Top bucket list movies to see before you die, Green Lantern HBO Max with focus on several Green Lanterns, Marvel's Thunderbolts comic book getting a reboot, new animated Christmas movie coming from the directors pf Killer Klowns From Outer Space, TMNT The Last Ronin, Google humming. Rev…
 
The articles presented in Decentralization, Regional Diversity, and Conflict: The Case of Ukraine (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) aim to explore the current political and administrative challenges that Ukraine is facing. The volume draws particular attention to the issues that have been escalated and intensified since the inception of the Russo-Ukrainia…
 
This week we talk about Reina Nascino (37:46), Youth Activists using social media effectively in Thailand (45:23), Kim Kardshain and the insane money she makes on Instagram (55:04), and who swept most of the awards at the Billboard Music Awards (01:05:41) Thanks to our sponsors for this mix: SUNBEAMS LIFESTYLE & SHOPBACK APP Hear more about it - (5…
 
Political scientists Alan Chong and Quang Min Pham bring with their edited volume, Critical Reflections on China’s Belt and Road Initiative (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020), originality as well as dimensions and perspectives to the discussion about the Belt and Road that are highly relevant but often either unrecognized or underemphasized. The book is ab…
 
In a century marked by totalitarian regimes, genocide, mass migrations, and shifting borders, the concept of memory in Eastern Europe is often synonymous with notions of trauma. In Ukraine, memory mechanisms were disrupted by political systems seeking to repress and control the past in order to form new national identities supportive of their own a…
 
In this episode, Siobhan talks with Charles L. Zelden about the new expanded edition of his book, Bush v. Gore: Exposing the Growing Crisis in American Democracy (University Press of Kansas, 2020). Zelden is a professor in the Department of History and Political Science at Nova Southeastern University's Halmos College of Arts and Sciences, where he…
 
One was a teenage Jewish girl, forcibly transported from her home in Hungary to a Nazi concentration camp. The other was a British doctor, whose experiences serving in two world wars could not compare to the horrors he saw at the end of the war. In her book All the Horrors of War: A Jewish Girl, a British Doctor, and the Liberation of Bergen-Belsen…
 
This weeks news stories include marrying ghosts, lube is not a sanitizer, pineapple on pizza is out and razor blades are in, murder hornets are back and more! Plus we take a 1950's marriage test to see if we're still compatible. Stir It Up performed by Patti LaBelle Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/burrmartinexperience/ Twitter @burrmartin Instag…
 
Seth Masket’s new book, Learning from Loss: The Democrats, 2016-2020 (Cambridge UP, 2020) takes the outcome of the 2016 presidential race and Donald Trump’s unexpected winning of the presidency as the jumping off point to examine not only what the Democratic Party came to understand about this outcome, but also how it shaped the nomination battle i…
 
On July 1, 2020, China introduced a National Security Law into Hong Kong partly in an attempt to quell months of civil unrest, as a mechanism to safeguard China’s security. In this new book, China’s National Security: Endangering Hong Kong’s Rule of Law? (Hart, 2020), Cora Chan and Fiona de Londras bring together a host of internationally renowned …
 
Black Americans are by far the most unified racial group in American electoral politics, with 80 to 90 percent identifying as Democrats—a surprising figure given that nearly a third now also identify as ideologically conservative, up from less than 10 percent in the 1970s. Why has ideological change failed to push more black Americans into the Repu…
 
In Interpretive Social Science: An Anti-Naturalist Approach (Oxford University Press, 2018), Mark Bevir and Jason Blakely make a case for why interpretivism is the most philosophically cogent approach currently on offer in the social sciences, and for anti-naturalism as the best option among interpretivist alternatives. Part survey of existing appr…
 
Sayyid Fadl, a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad, led a unique life—one that spanned much of the nineteenth century and connected India, Arabia, and the Ottoman Empire. For God or Empire: Sayyid Fadl and the Indian Ocean World (Stanford University Press) tells his story, part biography and part global history, as his life and legacy afford a singu…
 
Dr. Mathews is the Brooke Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Florida and the Director of the Center for OCD, Anxiety and Related Disorders at the University of Florida. Dr. Mathews completed her undergraduate education at Cornell University, and her medical training at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Mathews’ research and clinic…
 
Why are we so concerned with belonging? In what ways does our belonging constitute our identity? Is belonging a universal concept or a culturally dependent value? How does belonging situate and motivate us? In these days of identity politics, these issues are more significant and more complex than ever. Joseph E. David grapples with these questions…
 
Who truly controls immigration law in the United States? Though common sense might suggest the U.S. Congress, legal scholars Adam B. Cox and Cristina M. Rodríguez argue that the president is in fact the immigration policymaker-in-chief. In this interview, we speak with co-author Rodríguez about their new book The President and Immigration Law (Oxfo…
 
We have a Leche Fan Mail sharing their thoughts on speaking Tagalog as a second language (00:45), we find out what other Leche Fans are watching nowadays (19:46), and several Gatas a Question ranging from LGBTQ curiosity, Rica's Bachelor's Degree, and how we maxmize our Time (24:03) Thanks to our sponsors for this mix: LAZADA! Shop on Lazada and he…
 
This week Chris is joined by top palaeoanthropologist Lee Berger and BMJ executive editor Theo Bloom to dissect the science behind the headlines. As Donald Trump recovers from his coronavirus infection, what experimental treatments has he received, and what have we learned about managing COVID since the pandemic started? The Nobel Prizes are out: w…
 
Guest: Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees When the pandemic first took hold earlier this year, refugees around the world braced for the worst. Tightly packed camps with poor hygiene seemed like viral hotspots in waiting. But these nightmare scenarios largely did not come to pass, or at least hasn’t yet. Even still, UN High Commission…
 
In her book, Statelessness: A Modern History (Harvard University Press, 2020), Mira L. Siegelberg traces the history of the concept of statelessness in the years following the First and Second World Wars. At its core, this thoughtful monograph is an intellectual history of an idea that jurists in the United States and Europe struggled to agree upon…
 
India’s urban slums exhibit dramatic variation in their access to basic public goods and services—paved roads, piped water, trash removal, sewers, and streetlights. Why are some vulnerable communities able to secure development from the state while others fail? Author Adam Michael Auerbach, Assistant Professor at the School of International Service…
 
This week we talk about Rafael Nadal and the NBA Champion Los Angeles Lakers (36:03), Ms. Universe cattiness five years later (42:14), the impact (and some controversy) of the online BTS Concert (53:00), and why netizens are split on the recent Ingat Angat campaign (01:06:21) Thanks to our sponsor for this mix: SUNBEAMS LIFESTYLE! Hear more about i…
 
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