Hello, this is AJ, welcome to the vocabulary lesson for "Excitement." Let's start. Our first word is specificity, specificity, a little difficult to pronounce, specificity. In fact,

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Excitement Vocabulary Text

Hello, this is AJ, welcome to the vocabulary lesson for "Excitement." Let's start.

Our first word is specificity, specificity, a little difficult to pronounce, specificity. In fact,

many native speakers have trouble pronouncing this word, especially if you say it fast

in a sentence, specificity, specificity, specificity. Sometimes have trouble

pronouncing it, too, but I'm doing it correctly now, specificity.

Specificity is the noun. Specificity means, um...specific-ness is what it really means,

right? It means being specific, being detailed, being very exact. It's kind of the

opposite of generality. Generality is the situation of being very general. So, for

example, you say “I want a lot more money." That statement is a generality, right? It's

not detailed. But if you say “I want $2,496", well that statement has specificity. It has

detail. It has specific-ness, so that's specificity.

Our next word is imprecise. Imprecise is an adjective. And, in fact, it's the opposite of

specific and it's the opposite of precise. Precise is very similar to specific, it means

you'd be very exact, very detailed. So, again, “I want $2,496.20." That's precise,

that's detailed.

The opposite is imprecise, meaning not detailed, not precise. Imprecise means "I'd

like some more money," right? That's not detailed. It's very general, it's imprecise.

So Tim Ferris is saying that the question "what do I want", it's an imprecise question.

It's not a specific question, it's too general. It's too imprecise.

Our next word is fated, to be fated. He says the question "what are your goals", that

question is fated for confusion, it's fated to cause confusion. To be fated for means to

be destined for. It means something that absolutely will happen in the future or soon.

So to be fated for confusion, it means it absolutely will create confusion in the near

future or in the far future. So that question, that general question, what are your goals

or what are my goals or what do I want, it's fated to cause confusion. It absolutely will

cause confusion.

Next is the word worthwhile. So he's saying "What is the purpose of goals? Why are

goals worthwhile?" Worthwhile means beneficial. So why are goals beneficial? Why

are goals useful, helpful, good to do, good to have, worthwhile? So worthwhile, again,

beneficial, helpful, useful, worthwhile, so worthwhile, why are goals useful? Why are

goals worthwhile? Why are they worthwhile?

80 episodes