64. Tri Cities Influencer Podcast featuring Jesse Campos

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Paul Casey:

Dissonance is a terrible way to go through life. It's sort of like drifting. When we live a little bit off, we actually reduce our chance of longevity in our jobs. We're closer to burnout when we do that and we just live an unfulfilled life.

Speaker 2:

Raising the water level of leadership in the Tri-Cities of Eastern Washington, it's Tri-City's Influencer Podcast. Welcome to the TCI podcast, where a local leadership and self-leadership expert Paul Casey interviews, local CEOs, entrepreneurs and non-profit executives. To hear how they lead themselves and their teams so we can all benefit from their wisdom and experience. And here's your host, Paul Casey of Growing Forward Services, coaching and equipping individuals and teams to spark breakthrough success.

Paul Casey:

It's a great day to grow forward. Thanks for joining me for today's episode with Jesse Campos. Jesse is the executive Director of Adult and Teen Challenge here in the Tri-Cities. I asked him for a fun fact about himself and he said he really doesn't like getting dirty. When did you come to grips with that, Jesse?

Jesse Campos:

Oh my gosh. I’ll tell you this, my first kid Caleb, he was a baby and we just had him. I had my favorite jacket on. And so it was bouncing him on my lap and everything. And all of a sudden, you know how babies do, he threw up all over me and I was in panic because I was dirty, but at the same time my kid was there too. So it was just like, "Oh, what do I do?" I'm running back and forth. My wife saw me running back and forth and she just started laughing and she came to my rescue. So yeah, that was something that I will never forget in panic mode. So yeah.

Paul Casey:

So we're not going to do any mud runs together.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

That's what you're saying.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, Yeah. No, I can't.

Paul Casey:

Well, we're going to dive in after checking in with our Tri-City Influencer sponsor.

Paul Casey:

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Paul Casey:

Thank you for your support of leadership development in the Tri-Cities. Well welcome, Jesse. I was privileged to meet you. Man, I don't know how many years ago. It was probably, man at least 10 years ago.

Jesse Campos:

It has to be. It has to be.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

Well, you know what? Teen Challenge has been in existence here for 13 years.

Paul Casey:

13 years, okay.

Jesse Campos:

So almost 13 years ago.

Paul Casey:

Okay. And I was at a church at that point.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

Executive pastor at a church. And you came as a guest, I think when we would bring in local community outreach programs. And you shared about the mission of Teen Challenge.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

And as a church, we wanted to further that mission. And I think I remember the guys coming out.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, yeah.

Paul Casey:

And they would come to the services. They would serve, they would do some awesome things that also blessed the church back.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

So yeah, good stuff. So it's great to see you back at the organization, after a journey through some other jobs.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, yeah.

Paul Casey:

So just so our Tri-City influencers can get to know you better, tell us about that journey. What were some of those career highlights that got you to where you are today?

Jesse Campos:

Well man, back in the day, my heart is really community, helping those that were like me. So basically a lot of help, a lot of teenagers mentor them through gangs and at risk kids. And then I was at Jubilee Youth Ranch. I don't know if you remember that.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

And my heart was back in the Tri-Cities and so I kept wanting to go back. And then finally, a couple years later, I got a call from the [USA 00:04:40] Teen Challenge Director. He said, "Hey, I heard you want to open up a home in Pasco, and we're really interested. You need to talk to my son." And his son was a CEO of a Pacific Northwest Teen Challenge.

Paul Casey:

Wow.

Jesse Campos:

And that that's basically where it started. And then after that left, that was there for about four years, five years. And then I went to start a gang outreach program called Peterman Outreach where we went through prisons and juvenile detention centers and just tried to mentor them and tried to help them.

Jesse Campos:

So my passion is always helping those that were like me. And then I started at Tri-City Dream Center, and that's basically outreach focused. So we helped the homeless. We did some more mentoring and we did this Adopt a Block where we serve neighborhoods that need it most. Help mow lawns, pick up trash, whatever it may be.

Jesse Campos:

And then all of a sudden, my former boss from Teen Challenge gives me a call and we were talking about it and he said, "Man, wouldn't it be great going back?" And so we did some negotiation and whatnot, and voila. I'm back there. Yeah, so it's been great, man. Just recently, we had our capacity of 12 guys and we just recently expanded that to 24 guys. So it's been a great adventure.

Paul Casey:

Wow. Yeah. And just in case people aren't familiar with Adult and Teen Challenge, what's its mission?

Jesse Campos:

Man, it's mission is to put hope within reach of every drug addict. It's an 12 month faith-based residential program. And we just want to help individuals build foundation underneath them and, man, help them to be better and successful. Yeah, for sure.

Paul Casey:

And you said you wanted to help people through situations that you had experienced personally. So why do you love what you do?

Jesse Campos:

Man, so Paul as you know, I'm a former drug addict, a gang affiliate for many years since the age of nine. And I love doing it because if somebody did that to me when I was young, I don't think my life would have been what I went through. I've been through a lot of stuff. So therefore I'm passionate to reach out those that were like me. And it's something that I surround myself with those that have the same desire, same passion. And tell you what, man, it's been a phenomenal journey and I just love it. What's more awesome to witness is a individual transformed right before you. I'm not talking about age. I'm talking about soul. I'm talking about life and just like seeing a butterfly in a cocoon, right. And I'll tell you what, man, it's phenomenal to see that transformation before you.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. Wow. What an inspiration to be able to see that. And though, it's always inspiring when you'd have a banquet and the guys would be up there in the front and they'd hold up the sign. "This is what I was and this is what I am." And they flip the sign around. This is what he is.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah. Yeah.

Paul Casey:

It just brings tears to your eyes to see that transformation.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

So I could see why that would drive you every day.

Jesse Campos:

Oh yeah, yeah.

Paul Casey:

So you had to make a decision, whether to come back to Teen Challenge as executive director and before that you made that decision to start the gang outreach. Before that, as you were saying along the way, how did you decide when to make that leap and say, "All right, I'm going to do this now." What went through your mind for making that decision?

Jesse Campos:

Man, again, it's the why that is passionate for me. And looking at that Teen Challenge and going back when I first started the program, man, it was really hard. So I always felt like it was I was divorced. I was a stepdad and I see my kids over there and whatnot. And it was always something that I was driven and passionate about. And so I had to really talk my wife and say, "Hey, what do you think?" And it was something that, first of all, I am married and my wife's opinion matters to me. And you don't never want to make a move when it splits up your family for the decision that you've done.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

So that was something that, man, seeing again, it's something that I loved. So man, I went back and man, I felt like home. Yeah.

Paul Casey:

And she's right in there with you, right? She's the office manager or what's her role?

Jesse Campos:

Right now she is not employed with us.

Paul Casey:

Okay.

Jesse Campos:

But she does come and volunteer all the time.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

So she makes sure my men are ship-shape and you know my wife, man. She does not fear anybody. So she's a Latina. She will knock somebody out if they get out of hand. So yeah, so she's there. She always helps out in whatever capacity she can.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. And I'm sure you'll welcome volunteers back when we get through this COVID thing.

Jesse Campos:

Oh yeah absolutely. Yeah. That's something that we definitely need. Yeah.

Paul Casey:

And that's probably one of your hassles right now, but what are some of the hardest things about being an executive director right now in Teen challenge?

Jesse Campos:

Well, the hardest thing really is, have you ever been in a point that you know that someone's going to fall and you want to yell? You want to scream.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

So watch for that pit, watch for that manhole, watch for whatever they may be wandering into. And they just don't hear you. I'm talking about my students and stuff like that. And those there, a lot of us have our own perception of ourselves, but others have perceptions of you as well. So I'm looking at this, "Well, I'm healthy, I can do it." I think that's the hardest part of Teen Challenge is seeing an individual going through that pit and you're yelling, you're trying to help out. But I mean, you can lead that horse to the water, but you can't make them drink it.

Paul Casey:

Yep.

Jesse Campos:

So that's one of the hardest things for me to do. And I was raised in a really, how you say it? My dad never let me go out of the house rarely ever.

Paul Casey:

Yes.

Jesse Campos:

Sheltered in a sense. And so meeting new people was very hard for me when I started Teen Challenge, so I was raised up in East side of Pasco. So majority are minorities that lived over there. And so now I come into try to network and go to chambers meetings. And so I was very quiet. It was very hard and I think it was just un-normal to me to be with other people. And so that was the hardest part. And now it's still hard, but I've grown out of it. I, again, focus on the why and whatnot. And so those are the hardest things to face from that.

Paul Casey:

Yeah, that's so good. I think many of our listeners might be more on the introverted side.

Jesse Campos:

Right.

Paul Casey:

Or maybe they're shy to go to a networking activity when we're allowed to do that again.

Jesse Campos:

Right.

Paul Casey:

Or to reach out to new folks. But like you said, the why is the thing that drives you because you want to promote something.

Jesse Campos:

Right.

Paul Casey:

You want to promote something transformational.

Jesse Campos:

Right.

Paul Casey:

So it pushes you through the fear of why you want to be in that room.

Jesse Campos:

Right, right.

Paul Casey:

What would you say to people, Jesse, who have a coworker, a direct report, a friend who's really struggling? I mean, it's obvious that that person is struggling with something. And like you said, you want to yell, "Get out from in front of that bus. It's going to hit you." How do you do that compassionately to show you care? And yet not, like you said, you can't make them drink.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, man. That's very hard to do because some may take offense.

Paul Casey:

Right.

Jesse Campos:

And become defensive and you can never reach. So it's a moment of, "How are you doing today?" and if they come to you normally, they come to you and say, "Man, you know what? I'm struggling right now." And when they open up, then that's what gives you a gateway to open up as well.

Paul Casey:

Gotcha.

Jesse Campos:

And that's the hardest part when you see families, especially. Because family, sometimes they don't listen to you. So that's something that you wait for the moment.

Jesse Campos:

Oh, crazy thing. I was in Walla Walla Penitentiary. I was in IMU, the whole per se. So these guys were shackled from their feet to their waist to the arms. Shackled, to the desks. I had eight guys at a time and these guys, some of them were lifers. Some of them were spending a long time in prison. I never told them that I was a minister or a pastor, right. So there was a lesson I was teaching. And I said, "Man, you know what? I got to say something here." I said, "I'm a pastor." And those guys totally just flipped out. "No, you're not." Some even cursed.

Paul Casey:

Oh.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, yeah. "No, you're not." And the reason why I said that, because there were open to me. These guys never would open to anybody else, but I was like them. So they opened up and then I told them who I really was, my identity, what I face every day. And it opened the door for me to help them more. It opened a door to really tell them, "Hey, you need help. You need to change."

Paul Casey:

So it sounds like being vulnerable as a leader and in your relationships, people will see you then as like them.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

And then maybe, just maybe, they'll open up too, and then when that door cracks open a little bit.

Jesse Campos:

Than you get in.

Paul Casey:

You've got the opportunity to speak into their life, or just at least find out what's going on in their lives.

Jesse Campos:

Right. Right. Yeah.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. That's good. How have you grown as a leader, as an executive director from the first time? You said networking things, that stretched you. Now as you look back from the first time you were executive director at Teen Challenge and now, how else have you matured or grown?

Jesse Campos:

Oh my gosh. I think I've grown a lot. I mean, meeting people like you and the former pastors that were previous there in the church and just surround myself with those that have been successful in non-profits or been successful where in my capacity, in my field. And just ask them questions, sit down with them and just say, "Hey man, this is what I'm struggling with. What kind of advice would you give me?" And follow them on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook.

Paul Casey:

Yes.

Jesse Campos:

And just see how they approach things and what they're doing. And that really, again, I used to take things personal when people didn't want to talk to me, when people just... I took things personal, but then really focusing on the why really helped me push me. And I think that's something that was really, and now I don't get personal. I just say, "Hey, I won't to talk to you." And I'll go somewhere else.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

So it's something that is just don't take it personal. I actually cried, bro.

Paul Casey:

Whoa.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, man. It was that personal to me because I really was passionate about my job. I was really passionate at helping people. And now it's something that your batting average, it's not going to be a thousand. You're going to hit sometimes. You may hit a single, may hit a double, maybe triple, maybe even a home run. But your batting average is not going to be a thousand. So we have to remember every time we swing and we don't get struck out, hey there's a next time you're going to come up and bat again.

Paul Casey:

That's a good illustration of how the best hitters in baseball still only get on base three out of 10 times.

Jesse Campos:

Right, right. Exactly.

Paul Casey:

[crosstalk 00:16:41] It's like a really awesome batting average.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, yeah.

Paul Casey:

So even in your networking or if you're prospecting for customers or you're trying to make a difference in someone's life, you're going to come up short.

Jesse Campos:

Right.

Paul Casey:

Maybe even the majority of the time, but boy, those few times where it lands.

Jesse Campos:

Absolutely.

Paul Casey:

And you're able to make an impact in somebody's life, it's so much worth it.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, absolutely.

Paul Casey:

Well, you probably have a lot on your plate. We all have huge to-do lists. And I'm just wondering, how do you decide what to work on on a given day? Because probably no two days look the same for you in your jobs.

Jesse Campos:

Absolutely.

Paul Casey:

So how do you triage those tasks? Or how do you decide what to delegate? Or maybe even just say, "Nope, we can't do that this year or this month."

Jesse Campos:

Right. I think it's developing the team around you.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

And really leading them and understanding that that is your core. Those are the guys that you need to invest your time in. That is the guys that you want to teach them leadership and how to deal with things and how you would deal with things. And so my guys, my team, I always tell them, and this is my motto. "Don't assume excellence. Teach excellence." And oftentimes we believe that everybody assumes what right or wrong is, and it's not. So therefore teaching your team to develop the way you want to develop and let them catch your vision. And so prioritize whatever is happening.

Jesse Campos:

So we just came out of our project. So I oversee that the thrift stores, oversee we're opening up a new counseling center here in the end of this month, the outreach component and the residential component. So basically it's a juggling act and whatever is more. And then you got the financial piece. So it's very hard to... Then you've got day-to-day fires you have to put out. So really just, your team can help you. That'll be great so you can focus on what it is. But if they can't, just focus on the why. And sometimes if my budget's due by the end of this week, but some guys suicidal or this guy wants to leave the program or this guy is missing, I would stop everything and focus on the person because ultimately our goal is to put hope within reach of every drug addict.

Paul Casey:

So that trumps every task on your plate. If that person needs you, that's going to trump all those tasks.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. But then you need to go focus back and get it out there.

Paul Casey:

That's right.

Jesse Campos:

Yes. As executive director, man, you're up at midnight pushing those paperwork.

Paul Casey:

Wow.

Jesse Campos:

But I tell you what man, it's been rewarding.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. So just so our listeners know, maybe there's some thrift store shoppers out there like my mom. No, actually I like it. My wife and I like those store too. What's the address of the thrift store?

Jesse Campos:

Oh, good question. If you just Google it or whatnot, it's Teen Challenge Thrift Store in Pasco. It's right on Sylvester.

Paul Casey:

Okay.

Jesse Campos:

And right across from the Eagles Salon or whatever it is.

Paul Casey:

Okay.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, yeah. Right there on the corner of 10th and Sylvester.

Paul Casey:

Sylvester, okay. That's good. So please patronize the local businesses. You're helping Teen Challenge just by shopping there. That's cool.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

Well hey, we'll come back from a break here, a shout out to our sponsors. And then we'll ask Jesse about how he develops relationships.

Paul Casey:

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Paul Casey:

So Jesse, you probably believe like I do that leadership is relationships and they're the key to your success. So how do you intentionally develop a relationship with a guy that comes into the program?

Jesse Campos:

And it is. Man, it's just being vulnerable with him, being genuine. You're not there just to check the box and get the data or the survey done. You're really there to really serve. And I think that servant leadership is very important.

Paul Casey:

Yes.

Jesse Campos:

So you're there for the person. We have a motto of my team. I say, "We're together, heart and soul." And it's really not about the person's characteristics or where you struggling. It is ultimately the soul of a person. So we can bypass everything and really look at the person and develop that relationship with them. I think it surpasses them and they will really be willing to engage with you if you're vulnerable.

Jesse Campos:

And I think with donors too, with people. I mean, if you're really transparent with them and let them know, man. I've developed a lot of mentors now that were my donors and those relationships that have really been awesome. And I try to be genuine as much as possible. What you see me here behind the mic and podcast with you, the same person I am on the alter preaching.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. No mask.

Jesse Campos:

No mask. There's nothing. So being vulnerable, is really, really, and understanding the why and what drives you and what are you doing? And I think donors and people that you network with will see that and want to get to know you too. And then those relationships, you need to finesse those relationships. You're not there just for the money.

Paul Casey:

Right.

Jesse Campos:

So you're not there just for their investment. You're there to try to learn from them, especially a millionaire. How'd you get that money? It's like, "What did you do?" He might be an entrepreneur and has his own business. "I'm struggling with this? What's your...", And they will be open to talk to you. And so it's something that relationships is very, very... I have my own personal motto, especially when we deal with programs, is that programs graduate people, but relationships change people. And oftentimes we need to look at that. Of course, I'm here to teach, learn, mentor, but I think the relationships trumps, as you said, trumps the programming. Because once you build that strong, I think people will begin to change.

Paul Casey:

Well, a lot of value bombs that Jesse's dropping here. Teaching excellence, don't assume excellence together, heart and soul on a team or a staff. And that programs graduate, but relationships change. These are really good. These are good mottos that you've got that drive you. And I could tell they are part of that why, the culture that you're trying to create. So you mentioned donors is one of the relationships that you also have too. So you've got the guys, you got your team, you've got donors that you have to be in relationships. What other strategic relationships do you have to nurture as a executive director?

Jesse Campos:

Man, in every aspect. I think in every person you meet can potentially be somebody that wants to be a part of your program.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

From the cashier in the grocery store, from the customer that you bumped your car into. I mean, it's everybody, it can be somebody, a part of your organization. And so I remember one time I was at Walmart and the cashier was there and just wasn't even looking at me, just scanning the stuff. It was busy and crowded. So I reached over and I touched her hands and said, "Hey, how are you doing today?" And she looked at me, kind of take a deep breath and said, "Man, you know what? It's been busy today." Oh, and I start cracking some jokes and that lady found me on Facebook.

Paul Casey:

No way.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah. And said, "Thank you." So it's something, anybody. I mean, you can impact anybody and they can be part of your network. Like I said, the relationships we develop is somebody that really understands you and is willing to invest in you in whatever capacity that they can, and maybe help you and mentor you to reach your goals.

Paul Casey:

That's a cool story.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

We've got impact. And anybody we run into, most of us are home bound a lot of the time now.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

So when we do get out in the world, it probably even means more to connect with people that are on the front lines, helping us out day to day.

Jesse Campos:

Yes. Right.

Paul Casey:

And then have you had to change your relationship strategy for the land of COVID? Have you had to go more towards social media, email, phone calls, Zoom?

Jesse Campos:

Absolutely. I mean, that's something Zoom was something that I've done a lot lately but also it's very important to keep connected, regardless of the COVID you can't meet with people. Keep connected through newsletters, set up a meeting on Zoom, on social media, telling what you're doing in your organization. Just continue to keep people informed and that's the way we do it.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. I would assume the stories are the thing that connects people the most to the mission, right?

Jesse Campos:

Absolutely.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. Because stories stick and that makes people want to move toward your organization and the transformation that's happening.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

Well, self care is essential for mental health and top performance, especially now. So what recharges your batteries? What fills your tank?

Jesse Campos:

My family.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

I mean, my kids. I couldn't have my baby boy. We couldn't have kids. For 12 years my wife and I were struggling to have a kid.

Paul Casey:

Wow.

Jesse Campos:

And yeah. And so when I had my baby boy, it was something that was very important to me. So I have two kids, Caleb now he just turned 10 in October, and my little daughter, she's eight and about to turn nine at the end of this month. And so I call them my monkeys. So making sure that my phone is off by seven o'clock when I get home, my staff has it just in case of emergencies or whatnot, but my family's time is my family time. And that refuels me and just spending time with family and let work be at work and let your family.

Jesse Campos:

And I grew up in, again, in a pastor's home. And I remember that my dad was always helping others, but he didn't help me. And I was mad at him for that. Everybody else was hurting and I was hurting, but yeah, he went to help everybody else except me.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

So understanding that what's most important to you and for me, it's my family, my kids. And I make sure I stop everything to ensure that my kids have dad's attention. [crosstalk 00:28:12] And so that's something that refuels me. And then of course your wife, you got to take her out on dates. We have a little routine that we watch our, I don't want to call it soap operas because I'm a man, but we have our TV shows that we watch.

Paul Casey:

Yes. Guilty pleasure.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah. And that's just me and her. so that's something that really refuels me, is spending time with my family.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. It's like you got to take care of that inner circle first.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, absolutely.

Paul Casey:

Those closest to you, because it's tragic to have to share that story, right, of your dad and took care of everybody else, the outer circle before the inner circle.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah, absolutely.

Paul Casey:

And that it hurt you deeply over the years, but you're breaking the chain.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

And you're going to do your family first. And it was probably super hard and I'm sure there's probably a listener out there that may need to hear this, but you couldn't have kids for a long time.

Jesse Campos:

Right.

Paul Casey:

That was probably hard on your marriage.

Jesse Campos:

It was.

Paul Casey:

And all of the things that you probably tried. What would you say to a couple that's really struggling with having kids?

Jesse Campos:

Don't give up. I mean, it is something that we almost did and my wife thought she had a bladder infection and I was like, "Get out of here." And her mom said, "Go get a test." And she yelled at her, say, "Don't say that, Mom. You know I can't have a kid." Well regardless, she did go do it. And she comes back and of course the test was positive. We went to the doctor and she was 26, 28 weeks along already.

Paul Casey:

Whoa.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah. So it was something that we found out a couple months later. Yeah. Boom [crosstalk 00:29:53]. Right. So it was something that don't give up. I mean, we lost hope, but just believe that can happen and continue that. And it will happen.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. What a miracle. Well, as an executive director you've got a lot of pressures coming at you and some of those are financial pressures, right.

Jesse Campos:

Oh, absolutely.

Paul Casey:

As a nonprofit, you're always struggling with not having enough money, right. You could always use more money.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah.

Paul Casey:

I'm sure you're happy with the donations that come your way. How do you manage the financials of the organization? What does that evaluation look like? You talked about financial reports, that kind of stuff.

Jesse Campos:

Yeah. Well, there was a lot of things that we just got done last month before a yearly budget for this year. And really just looking at that and keep it close because oftentimes we can get busy with our day to day things, but the why is understanding that we need to support and you're there for a reason and you cannot do what you do and what you're passionate about, unless... I wish money grew on trees but it doesn't so you really have to look at that and strategize and see what are your goals and what are you going to do differently to raise support, or even allow guys to go work or trying to raise money somehow with banquets, whatever it may be. Just keep focused on that because then you never going to be able to do what you love to do.

Paul Casey:

Now you talked about strategizing because you have to keep pivoting and doing different things. So what does that look like? Do you have a big whiteboard and you get your team together and say "Let's brainstorm." Or is this all you in the quiet of your heart going, "All right, we've got to come up with some new plants."

Jesse Campos:

Yeah. No, as executive director, sometimes we've put the whole thing on top of us and it's really developing your team. So I tell my team everything. Oftentimes nobody tells the team the budgets because they didn't want them to stress or nothing like that. I tell my team the budget.

Paul Casey:

Transparency.

Jesse Campos:

Transparency, and really I tell them, "We are a team. And this is not Jesse Campos' outreach or organization. This is our organization." And let them feel a part of the organization and the vision of what you're doing. And I let them know. So what can we do? What can we do differently this year and whatnot. And we have a big brainstorming event in our room and we just go at it. And they feel so much pumped about it, that now they feel a part of the vision. And understanding, so the reason why I'm locked up in my office eight hours a day, they understand that, "Hey, Jesse's there and he's doing things that is going to help us." So really just depending on the team and I have my budget. I love electronics. So everything's electronic for me. And I have it on my computer and at first thing in the morning.,That's what I do. I look at my budget.

Paul Casey:

Wow, first thing.

Jesse Campos:

First thing in the morning.

Paul Casey:

Yeah.

Jesse Campos:

That drives me. And so what can I do different today to help my guys? And so that's something we do.

Paul Casey:

That's good. And I really believe that people help support what they help co-create. So if they have a voice and they've got input, they're probably going to be more on board with whatever you come up with as a group.

Jesse Campos:

Absolutely.

Paul Casey:

Well finally, Jesse, what advice would you give to new leaders or anyone who just wants to keep growing and gaining more influence?

Jesse Campos:

I tell you what, surround yourself with those that are maybe higher than you. Never be afraid to hire somebody that has more education than you because you can just really learn from them. Just surround yourself with those that have that wisdom and there's been several people in my life that I call. I text on a daily basis, "Hey man, I'm going through this. What do you recommend?" And again, we may see a perspective, but others that you surround yourself may see another perspective. And that gives you insight and different view and have that critical thought. Really looking at the bottle all the way around, not just one sided.

Jesse Campos:

And oftentimes we are one-sided because we have our own dreams, our own visions and ways it's going to work. But somebody who might have a greater plan and strategy for you. My dad always said, "Work smarter, not harder." So always wrap yourself with people that have the same passion and vision, or just want to help you and ask them those questions. And again, if it's volunteer, they feel more inclined to help you more because now they feel that they're part of it.

Jesse Campos:

And always give honor where honor is due. Never say, "This is our idea" and just forget about that volunteer that just gave you that. Honor them as well. And we don't know it all. We can't do everything ourselves and it takes people that you surround yourself with to help conquer your vision.

Paul Casey:

Yeah. So Tri-City Influencers, you heard it here, is get multiple perspectives in your business, in your whatever group you have. You got to have people wrapped around you as advisors to give you that different perspective. So you've got a lot more wisdom than just you in your own brain.

Jesse Campos:

Absolutely.

Paul Casey:

Well, Jesse, how can our listeners best connect with you and Adult and Teen Challenge?

Jesse Campos:

I'll tell you what, our best way, if you're on Facebook. I think everybody and their moms are on Facebook now. You can look us up at Tri-City Campus of Adult and Teen Challenge on Facebook.

Paul Casey:

Okay.

Jesse Campos:

You can reach us there. You can go to our website at www.TeenChallengePNW, for Pacific Northwest, .com or .org, whatever it is. You can get ahold of us there. So yeah, that's the best way. Or you can call our center, 547-2389.

Paul Casey:

Cool. Well, thanks again for all you do to make the Tri-Cities a great place and keep leading well.

Jesse Campos:

Thank you, Paul, for everything.

Paul Casey:

Let me wrap up our podcast today with a leadership resource to recommend. And it's more of a goal setting app that you could download. It's called Notion, N-O-T-I-O-N, dot S-O. Notion.SO. It's an app that helps you organize your to-do list, your goals list in one place. You create these little boards and then you can customize them to your liking with tags, with deadlines. You can share these with your team. You can delegate things or it could be just for you. And there is a free version that I'm trying out that for my goals this year, and also a paid version that gives you more bells and whistles. So again, that's Notion.SO.

Jesse Campos:

I use that too.

Paul Casey:

Again, this is Paul Casey, and I want to thank my guest, Jesse Campos from Adult and Teen Challenge for being here today on the Tri-Cities Influencer podcast. We also want to thank our Tri-City Influencer sponsor, invite you to support them. We appreciate you for making this possible so we can collaborate to make and help inspire leaders in our community.

Paul Casey:

Finally, one more leadership tidbit for the road, as you are making a difference in your circle of influence. It's a [Warren Venice 00:37:21] quote. He says, "Leadership is the capacity to translate vision into reality." Until next time [inaudible 00:37:30]. Keep rolling forward.

Speaker 2:

Thank you to our listeners for tuning in to today's show. Paul Casey is on a mission to add value to leaders by providing practical tools and strategies that reduce stress in their lives and on their teams so that they can enjoy life and leadership and experience their key desired results. If you'd like more help from Paul in your leadership development, connect with him at growingforward@paulcasey.org for a consultation that can help you move past your current challenges and create a strategy for growing your life or your team forward. Paul would also like to help you restore your sanity to your crazy schedule and getting your priorities done everyday by offering you his free control my calendar checklist. Go to www.takebackmycalendar.com for that productivity tool or open a text message to 72000 and type the word [inaudible 00:38:32].

Paul Casey:

Tri-Cities Influencer podcast was recorded at Fuse SPC by Bill Wagner of Safe Strategies.

67 episodes